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Can you port a landline number over to a VZW number?

Discussion in 'alt.cellular.verizon' started by Bob the Printer, Sep 26, 2005.

  1. I have a friend who wants to port his landline number over to his cellphone
    on VZW. Is this possible to do? I know one can hold onto a cellphone number
    when changing carriers, but not sure about the landline port to the
    cellphone..

    Thanks in advance!
     



    › See More: Can you port a landline number over to a VZW number?
  2. Savvy 1

    Savvy 1 Guest

    "Bob the Printer" <bdolson@comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:QZednavGwreuMKXeRVn-iA@comcast.com...
    >I have a friend who wants to port his landline number over to his cellphone
    >on VZW. Is this possible to do? I know one can hold onto a cellphone number
    >when changing carriers, but not sure about the landline port to the
    >cellphone..
    >
    > Thanks in advance!
    >


    Yes. I did it the first week you were able to port.

    S1
     
  3. Lena

    Lena Guest

    My sister ported her landline, which had been tied to her house in NJ
    ever since area codes were invented, to her cellphone (VZW) and
    promptly moved with it to AZ. Seems like "porting" will eventually
    mean that area codes don't have any relation to where the phone is
    located. I wonder if this was a consideration when the law to allow
    porting was passed.

    Lena
     
  4. Diamond Dave

    Diamond Dave Guest

    On 27 Sep 2005 13:31:15 -0700, "Lena" <lenagainster@gmail.com> wrote:

    >My sister ported her landline, which had been tied to her house in NJ
    >ever since area codes were invented, to her cellphone (VZW) and
    >promptly moved with it to AZ. Seems like "porting" will eventually
    >mean that area codes don't have any relation to where the phone is
    >located. I wonder if this was a consideration when the law to allow
    >porting was passed.


    Eventually area codes mapping to a specific area of land will become a
    moot point eventually. Its already starting with cell phones and VoIP
    services.

    When everyone will have either "free" or flat rate long distance and
    universal porting (landline to landline, landline to cell, and now
    with cell to cell), area codes will just be part of your phone number
    but not necessarily to a specific place.

    I give it no more than 10 years, maybe less.

    Dave
     
  5. IMHO IIRC

    IMHO IIRC Guest

    In news:t2qjj1h92hoblntaci7j891nfhjmc52n4k@4ax.com,
    Diamond Dave <dmine45.NOSPAM@yahoo.com> typed:
    > On 27 Sep 2005 13:31:15 -0700, "Lena" <lenagainster@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >> My sister ported her landline, which had been tied to her house in NJ
    >> ever since area codes were invented, to her cellphone (VZW) and
    >> promptly moved with it to AZ. Seems like "porting" will eventually
    >> mean that area codes don't have any relation to where the phone is
    >> located. I wonder if this was a consideration when the law to allow
    >> porting was passed.

    >
    > Eventually area codes mapping to a specific area of land will become a
    > moot point eventually. Its already starting with cell phones and VoIP
    > services.
    >
    > When everyone will have either "free" or flat rate long distance and
    > universal porting (landline to landline, landline to cell, and now
    > with cell to cell), area codes will just be part of your phone number
    > but not necessarily to a specific place.
    >
    > I give it no more than 10 years, maybe less.
    >
    > Dave


    Cell phones are mobile devices, therefore they can operate anywhere there is
    a compatible tower.
    The area code defines the phones home location, which is contacted to obtain
    authorization to allow the phone roam.
    You can keep your cell number - area code and all - and go to another area
    code. But all calls from the that area code to the cell phone number will
    be long distance.

    For land lines there are specific area codes (and for that matter prefixes -
    the three digits after the area code) which are designated to specific land
    areas served by the switching equipment for that area code and prefix.

    When I moved access town I was unable to keep my phone number (same phone
    company) because the area I moved to had a different prefix. Number
    portability is not to keep your number when you physically move - but to
    keep your current number if you stay in the same place and change phone
    service providers.
     
  6. Lena wrote:

    >My sister ported her landline, which had been tied to her house in NJ
    >ever since area codes were invented, to her cellphone (VZW) and
    >promptly moved with it to AZ. Seems like "porting" will eventually
    >mean that area codes don't have any relation to where the phone is
    >located. I wonder if this was a consideration when the law to allow
    >porting was passed.
    >
    >Lena
    >
    >
    >

    I think part of the idea was the idea that when switching carriers, you
    don't move but you are issued a new phone number, and the previous phone
    number would be unissuable for a period of time, usually 90 days, if not
    always. The idea that NANPA will run out of phone numbers is becoming
    more realistic by the day, and the United States by far has the largest
    share of NANPA numbers, and therefore has the largest responisibility in
    number conservation, and the biggest share of the problem.

    TH
     
  7. "Tropical Haven" <email@example.net> wrote in message
    news:hVD_e.79881$Cc5.32427@lakeread06...

    > I think part of the idea was the idea that when switching carriers, you
    > don't move but you are issued a new phone number, and the previous phone
    > number would be unissuable for a period of time, usually 90 days, if not
    > always. The idea that NANPA will run out of phone numbers is becoming
    > more realistic by the day, and the United States by far has the largest
    > share of NANPA numbers, and therefore has the largest responisibility in
    > number conservation, and the biggest share of the problem.


    Ok, I'll play your silly game.... WHAT IS NANPA???

    I wish you people wouldn't rely so much on acronyms.. There are plain,
    ordinary people here who don't have knowledge of what you're typing about!
     
  8. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    IMHO IIRC wrote:
    > Cell phones are mobile devices, therefore they can operate anywhere there is
    > a compatible tower.
    > The area code defines the phones home location, which is contacted to obtain
    > authorization to allow the phone roam.
    > You can keep your cell number - area code and all - and go to another area
    > code. But all calls from the that area code to the cell phone number will
    > be long distance.
    >
    > For land lines there are specific area codes (and for that matter prefixes -
    > the three digits after the area code) which are designated to specific land
    > areas served by the switching equipment for that area code and prefix.
    >
    > When I moved access town I was unable to keep my phone number (same phone
    > company) because the area I moved to had a different prefix. Number
    > portability is not to keep your number when you physically move - but to
    > keep your current number if you stay in the same place and change phone
    > service providers.


    What we have is *LOCAL* number portability. This means that you can
    change the provider for a number to any company (landline or wireless)
    that serves the same "rate center" as the current provider for that
    number. A "rate center" is a bunch of area-code/3-digit-prefixes in the
    same geographic area which are treated equivalently for long distance
    and call routing purposes. In other words, you can port your number to a
    new provider, but you cannot port it to a new location. Now, obviously,
    with a cell phone, you can take your phone anywhere and use it, but any
    calls to it will be treated as calls to its home location, for long
    distance purposes. This is really only meaningful for landline phones
    which still have the notion of "long distance".
     
  9. Steve Sobol

    Steve Sobol Guest

    Bob the Printer wrote:
    > "Tropical Haven" <email@example.net> wrote in message
    > news:hVD_e.79881$Cc5.32427@lakeread06...
    >
    >
    >>I think part of the idea was the idea that when switching carriers, you
    >>don't move but you are issued a new phone number, and the previous phone
    >>number would be unissuable for a period of time, usually 90 days, if not
    >>always. The idea that NANPA will run out of phone numbers is becoming
    >>more realistic by the day, and the United States by far has the largest
    >>share of NANPA numbers, and therefore has the largest responisibility in
    >>number conservation, and the biggest share of the problem.

    >
    >
    > Ok, I'll play your silly game.... WHAT IS NANPA???


    The North American Numbering Plan Association, the organization that doles
    out area codes and blocks of numbers to telephone companies, etc. in the US
    and Canada. Currently run by Neustar, which also happens to be the operator
    of the .biz top-level Internet domain (if I am remembering correctly).

    > I wish you people wouldn't rely so much on acronyms.. There are plain,
    > ordinary people here who don't have knowledge of what you're typing about!


    This might help: http://www.nanpa.com/

    --
    Steve Sobol, Professional Geek 888-480-4638 PGP: 0xE3AE35ED
    Company website: http://JustThe.net/
    Personal blog, resume, portfolio: http://SteveSobol.com/
    E: sjsobol@JustThe.net Snail: 22674 Motnocab Road, Apple Valley, CA 92307
     
  10. Richard Ness

    Richard Ness Guest

    Jeez.... it's actually a common term.
    And since when is it "silly" to nicely pass on info.

    If you really wanted to know, Google it.


    "Bob the Printer" <bdolson@comcast.net> wrote in message news:0cidnew8pcqC_6beRVn-ig@comcast.com...
    >
    > "Tropical Haven" <email@example.net> wrote in message news:hVD_e.79881$Cc5.32427@lakeread06...
    >
    >> I think part of the idea was the idea that when switching carriers, you don't move but you are issued a new phone
    >> number, and the previous phone number would be unissuable for a period of time, usually 90 days, if not always. The
    >> idea that NANPA will run out of phone numbers is becoming more realistic by the day, and the United States by far has
    >> the largest share of NANPA numbers, and therefore has the largest responisibility in number conservation, and the
    >> biggest share of the problem.

    >
    > Ok, I'll play your silly game.... WHAT IS NANPA???
    >
    > I wish you people wouldn't rely so much on acronyms.. There are plain, ordinary people here who don't have knowledge
    > of what you're typing about!
    >
    >
    >
     
  11. "Richard Ness" <richard.no@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote in message
    news:dsednQLdN7Fj66beRVn-qQ@comcast.com...
    > Jeez.... it's actually a common term.
    > And since when is it "silly" to nicely pass on info.


    Common to YOU perhaps...
     
  12. Steve Sobol

    Steve Sobol Guest

    Bob the Printer wrote:
    > "Richard Ness" <richard.no@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote in message
    > news:dsednQLdN7Fj66beRVn-qQ@comcast.com...
    >
    >>Jeez.... it's actually a common term.
    >>And since when is it "silly" to nicely pass on info.

    >
    >
    > Common to YOU perhaps...


    Common to people who are familiar with telecomm jargon, I'm sure. Probably
    not common to others.

    --
    Steve Sobol, Professional Geek 888-480-4638 PGP: 0xE3AE35ED
    Company website: http://JustThe.net/
    Personal blog, resume, portfolio: http://SteveSobol.com/
    E: sjsobol@JustThe.net Snail: 22674 Motnocab Road, Apple Valley, CA 92307
     
  13. Richard Ness

    Richard Ness Guest

    It was the pissy tone of the reply...
    "silly game" was the phrase you used.

    The individual was trying to simply answer the question
    No "silly games" were being played.

    And.... as to Google. Use it - it is your friend!!
    A very quick and simple search would have answered
    your question. Faster than your snarky reply took to type, I'd bet.


    "Bob the Printer" <bdolson@comcast.net> wrote in message news:yZWdnQNAKur4iaHeRVn-sQ@comcast.com...
    >
    > "Richard Ness" <richard.no@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote in message news:dsednQLdN7Fj66beRVn-qQ@comcast.com...
    >> Jeez.... it's actually a common term.
    >> And since when is it "silly" to nicely pass on info.

    >
    > Common to YOU perhaps...
    >
    >
    >
     

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