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Cell instead of regular phone line?

Discussion in 'alt.cellular.verizon' started by Scott H, Mar 28, 2004.

  1. Steven J Sobol wrote:
    >
    > Joseph <JoeOfSeattle@yahoo.nonocom> wrote:
    > > On Tue, 30 Mar 2004 12:24:10 GMT, "jdoe" <jdoe@msn.com> wrote:
    > >
    > >>You may not be aware that even a deactivated phone must be able to dial 911
    > >>whether it's a mobil or a landline. It's a law. So even if he ditches the LL
    > >>he'll still be able to dial 911

    > >
    > > That is not the case everywhere.

    >
    > Isn't that an FCC rule?


    From http://tinyurl.com/2xn35:

    - The industry needs more diligent oversight. The FCC has the industry on an
    honor
    - system. The agency does no testing to monitor compliance with its 911 rule,
    says
    - Steven Dayhoff, an electronics engineer at the FCC labs. Of wireless companies
    and
    - 911, he says, "We assume that they have the software or firmware for
    call-handling
    - that they're supposed to have." He noted, however, "We have not tried it out."

    Larry
     



    › See More: Cell instead of regular phone line?
  2. Joseph

    Joseph Guest

    On Tue, 30 Mar 2004 09:13:05 -0600, Steven J Sobol
    <sjsobol@JustThe.net> wrote:

    >Joseph <JoeOfSeattle@yahoo.nonocom> wrote:
    >> On Tue, 30 Mar 2004 12:24:10 GMT, "jdoe" <jdoe@msn.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>>You may not be aware that even a deactivated phone must be able to dial 911
    >>>whether it's a mobil or a landline. It's a law. So even if he ditches the LL
    >>>he'll still be able to dial 911

    >>
    >> That is not the case everywhere.

    >
    >Isn't that an FCC rule?


    For *wireless* it's a rule. It's not a rule for wireline phones.

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    remove NONO from .NONOcom to reply
     
  3. Mark T

    Mark T Guest

    Also not mentioned, and it may be of limited applicability, but with one cell
    phone in the house, you have only one phone to "find" when it's ringing. I
    don't know about anyone else, but in my house with 2 cordless phones, I often
    dash for the corded one since I _know_ where it is :) In a big house, the
    phone may be quite a distance away. (I know, unless you carry it with you
    all the time)

    mark
     
  4. I'm not sure, but I think this is a state or even local regulation and I'm
    not even sure they still exist. I remember that in New York, a line that
    was out of service was still required to be physically connected and
    configured to either automically dial 911 (or the local emergency dept) or
    allow the dialing of those numbers....I also know that in many states, a
    line that has been disconnected for non-payment or other reasons must still
    allow 911 calls to go through. However, I've never seen any FCC regulation
    that requires it and as another has said, I've been in juristictions where
    the line is physically "cut" or disconnected at the CO such that there's no
    line power or dial tone so that any call is impossible....

    This is from memory, IANAL and I don't have any specific regulations to
    refer to that would give a definitive answer.

    Cheers,
    Jake

    "jdoe" <jdoe@msn.com> wrote in message
    news:KFdac.35419$w54.243729@attbi_s01...
    > You may not be aware that even a deactivated phone must be able to dial

    911
    > whether it's a mobil or a landline. It's a law. So even if he ditches the

    LL
    > he'll still be able to dial 911
    > Larry
    > "Scott Stephenson" <scott.stephensonson@adelphia.net> wrote in message
    > news:eek:9udnXtQrZdkl_rdRVn-ug@adelphia.com...
    > >
    > > "videoxfer" <videoxfer@xfer.tv> wrote in message
    > > news:MTD9c.120284$po.799006@attbi_s52...
    > > > On 2004-03-28, Scott Nelson - Wash DC <spamcop@bnmnetworks.net> wrote:
    > > > > 1. 911 calls are harder to locate callers position in Cell Phones

    then
    > > in
    > > > > Landlines
    > > >
    > > > Many modern cellphones include gps for 911 calls, so I don't think
    > > > this is a real issue anymore.

    > >
    > > The issue isn't with the phones- its with the Emergency Service

    Providers.
    > > Not all areas have upgraded with E911 technology.
    > >
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
  5. You might also consider dock-n-talk (www.phonelabs.com) seems to have more
    options to connect and a viable competitor (although this market is still
    extremely immature).

    "rbh martin" <rbhmartin@hotmail.spam.comcom> wrote in message
    news:WAO9c.9614$u_2.628@nwrddc01.gnilink.net...
    > >I use a Cellsocket

    >
    > what is a 'cell socket' and how does it work?
    >
    > rgh martin
    >
    >
     
  6. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <NMydnXPw75UcE_TdRVn-gg@lmi.net>,
    Steven J Sobol <sjsobol@JustThe.net> wrote:
    >Joseph <JoeOfSeattle@yahoo.nonocom> wrote:
    >> On Tue, 30 Mar 2004 12:24:10 GMT, "jdoe" <jdoe@msn.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>>You may not be aware that even a deactivated phone must be able to dial 911
    >>>whether it's a mobil or a landline. It's a law. So even if he ditches the LL
    >>>he'll still be able to dial 911

    >>
    >> That is not the case everywhere.

    >
    >Isn't that an FCC rule?


    It's an FCC rule that deactivated *mobile* phones (cellular,PCS,iDen) be
    able to connect to 911. There is no such regulation for landlines. Some
    landline companies leave deactivated lines physically connected to
    the switch so that 911 and 611 (to establish new service) will work,
    but that is certainly not universal. I would say that in most places,
    you end up with a dead pair of wires.
     
  7. gpsposter

    gpsposter Guest

    hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote in
    news:c4chcu02462@enews4.newsguy.com:

    > In article <NMydnXPw75UcE_TdRVn-gg@lmi.net>,
    > Steven J Sobol <sjsobol@JustThe.net> wrote:
    >>Joseph <JoeOfSeattle@yahoo.nonocom> wrote:
    >>> On Tue, 30 Mar 2004 12:24:10 GMT, "jdoe" <jdoe@msn.com> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>You may not be aware that even a deactivated phone must be able to
    >>>>dial 911 whether it's a mobil or a landline. It's a law. So even if
    >>>>he ditches the LL he'll still be able to dial 911
    >>>
    >>> That is not the case everywhere.

    >>
    >>Isn't that an FCC rule?

    >
    > It's an FCC rule that deactivated *mobile* phones (cellular,PCS,iDen)
    > be able to connect to 911. There is no such regulation for landlines.
    > Some landline companies leave deactivated lines physically connected
    > to the switch so that 911 and 611 (to establish new service) will
    > work, but that is certainly not universal. I would say that in most
    > places, you end up with a dead pair of wires.
    >


    I know that around here (Cincinnati), landline phones are left connected
    for a while (a couple of months) so that service can be quickly
    reestablished. During this time 611 and 911 are the only numbers that
    work. After a couple of months, the line may be physically disconnected.
     
  8. Brevdude

    Brevdude Guest

    I've done this myself...I would never go back to having a home phone
     

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