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Cell Phone jamming in your area?

Discussion in 'alt.cellular.verizon' started by Sandy A. Nicolaysen, Oct 5, 2004.

  1. These things have been in use in Princeton NJ restaurants for a couple
    of years now. Just wondering how widespread these jammers have
    become.

    http://www.globalgadgetuk.com/cell-phone-jammers.htm

    The reason I ask is because a thread in alt.cellular is debating the
    use of these jamming devices.

    There are six restaurants I've visited recently that jam the Verizon
    signal. The jammers also wipe out Sprint PCS and AT&T GSM signals.

    I guess you can't depend on wireless in case of emergencies. Oh well,
    back to giving the babysitter the wired number of the restaurant in
    case something goes bad.

    - Sandy
     



    › See More: Cell Phone jamming in your area?
  2. Scott

    Scott Guest

    I thought that the FCC outlawed devices that wil block cell phone
    signals (in the USA)?

    And after checking out the fine print at the bottom, it states that it
    is illegal in some countries.


    On Wed, 06 Oct 2004 04:02:43 GMT, Sandy A. Nicolaysen
    <sandynic@verizon.net> wrote:

    >These things have been in use in Princeton NJ restaurants for a couple
    >of years now. Just wondering how widespread these jammers have
    >become.
    >
    >http://www.globalgadgetuk.com/cell-phone-jammers.htm
    >
    >The reason I ask is because a thread in alt.cellular is debating the
    >use of these jamming devices.
    >
    >There are six restaurants I've visited recently that jam the Verizon
    >signal. The jammers also wipe out Sprint PCS and AT&T GSM signals.
    >
    >I guess you can't depend on wireless in case of emergencies. Oh well,
    >back to giving the babysitter the wired number of the restaurant in
    >case something goes bad.
    >
    >- Sandy
     
  3. Scott

    Scott Guest

    I thought that the FCC outlawed devices that wil block cell phone
    signals (in the USA)?

    And after checking out the fine print at the bottom, it states that it
    is illegal in some countries.


    On Wed, 06 Oct 2004 04:02:43 GMT, Sandy A. Nicolaysen
    <sandynic@verizon.net> wrote:

    >These things have been in use in Princeton NJ restaurants for a couple
    >of years now. Just wondering how widespread these jammers have
    >become.
    >
    >http://www.globalgadgetuk.com/cell-phone-jammers.htm
    >
    >The reason I ask is because a thread in alt.cellular is debating the
    >use of these jamming devices.
    >
    >There are six restaurants I've visited recently that jam the Verizon
    >signal. The jammers also wipe out Sprint PCS and AT&T GSM signals.
    >
    >I guess you can't depend on wireless in case of emergencies. Oh well,
    >back to giving the babysitter the wired number of the restaurant in
    >case something goes bad.
    >
    >- Sandy
     
  4. Steve Sobol

    Steve Sobol Guest

    Sandy A. Nicolaysen wrote:
    > These things have been in use in Princeton NJ restaurants for a couple
    > of years now. Just wondering how widespread these jammers have
    > become.
    >
    > http://www.globalgadgetuk.com/cell-phone-jammers.htm
    >
    > The reason I ask is because a thread in alt.cellular is debating the
    > use of these jamming devices.
    >
    > There are six restaurants I've visited recently that jam the Verizon
    > signal. The jammers also wipe out Sprint PCS and AT&T GSM signals.


    They're breaking federal law. They can get spanked hard by the FCC if they
    continue to operate the jammers. You might want to mention that fact to them.


    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services, http://JustThe.net/
    Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / 888.480.4NET (4638) / sjsobol@JustThe.net
    PGP Key available from your friendly local key server (0xE3AE35ED)
    Apple Valley, California Nothing scares me anymore. I have three kids.
     
  5. Steve Sobol

    Steve Sobol Guest

    Sandy A. Nicolaysen wrote:
    > These things have been in use in Princeton NJ restaurants for a couple
    > of years now. Just wondering how widespread these jammers have
    > become.
    >
    > http://www.globalgadgetuk.com/cell-phone-jammers.htm
    >
    > The reason I ask is because a thread in alt.cellular is debating the
    > use of these jamming devices.
    >
    > There are six restaurants I've visited recently that jam the Verizon
    > signal. The jammers also wipe out Sprint PCS and AT&T GSM signals.


    They're breaking federal law. They can get spanked hard by the FCC if they
    continue to operate the jammers. You might want to mention that fact to them.


    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services, http://JustThe.net/
    Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / 888.480.4NET (4638) / sjsobol@JustThe.net
    PGP Key available from your friendly local key server (0xE3AE35ED)
    Apple Valley, California Nothing scares me anymore. I have three kids.
     
  6. George

    George Guest

    "Sandy A. Nicolaysen" <sandynic@verizon.net> wrote in message
    news:pvq6m0hc2hn88sqj5on0k1072all0u0kaq@4ax.com...
    > These things have been in use in Princeton NJ restaurants for a couple
    > of years now. Just wondering how widespread these jammers have
    > become.
    >
    > http://www.globalgadgetuk.com/cell-phone-jammers.htm
    >
    > The reason I ask is because a thread in alt.cellular is debating the
    > use of these jamming devices.
    >
    > There are six restaurants I've visited recently that jam the Verizon
    > signal. The jammers also wipe out Sprint PCS and AT&T GSM signals.
    >
    > I guess you can't depend on wireless in case of emergencies. Oh well,
    > back to giving the babysitter the wired number of the restaurant in
    > case something goes bad.
    >
    > - Sandy
    >

    I would bet that if we were to poll people in the restaurant they would vote
    to not hear blasting cutsy ringtones and people yelling into phones while
    eating their dinner. As usual a few rude people ruin it for everyone. Phones
    have silent modes and voicemail and I don't understand why people don't use
    them when in a restaurant/movie etc..
     
  7. George

    George Guest

    "Sandy A. Nicolaysen" <sandynic@verizon.net> wrote in message
    news:pvq6m0hc2hn88sqj5on0k1072all0u0kaq@4ax.com...
    > These things have been in use in Princeton NJ restaurants for a couple
    > of years now. Just wondering how widespread these jammers have
    > become.
    >
    > http://www.globalgadgetuk.com/cell-phone-jammers.htm
    >
    > The reason I ask is because a thread in alt.cellular is debating the
    > use of these jamming devices.
    >
    > There are six restaurants I've visited recently that jam the Verizon
    > signal. The jammers also wipe out Sprint PCS and AT&T GSM signals.
    >
    > I guess you can't depend on wireless in case of emergencies. Oh well,
    > back to giving the babysitter the wired number of the restaurant in
    > case something goes bad.
    >
    > - Sandy
    >

    I would bet that if we were to poll people in the restaurant they would vote
    to not hear blasting cutsy ringtones and people yelling into phones while
    eating their dinner. As usual a few rude people ruin it for everyone. Phones
    have silent modes and voicemail and I don't understand why people don't use
    them when in a restaurant/movie etc..
     
  8. Richard Ness

    Richard Ness Guest

    If I discovered a business intentionally "jamming" ANY wireless signal,
    they would be IMMEDIATELY reported to the FCC. It is flat out ILLEGAL
    here in the USA.


    "Sandy A. Nicolaysen" <sandynic@verizon.net> wrote in message
    news:pvq6m0hc2hn88sqj5on0k1072all0u0kaq@4ax.com...
    > These things have been in use in Princeton NJ restaurants for a couple
    > of years now. Just wondering how widespread these jammers have
    > become.
    >
    > http://www.globalgadgetuk.com/cell-phone-jammers.htm
    >
    > The reason I ask is because a thread in alt.cellular is debating the
    > use of these jamming devices.
    >
    > There are six restaurants I've visited recently that jam the Verizon
    > signal. The jammers also wipe out Sprint PCS and AT&T GSM signals.
    >
    > I guess you can't depend on wireless in case of emergencies. Oh well,
    > back to giving the babysitter the wired number of the restaurant in
    > case something goes bad.
    >
    > - Sandy
    >
     
  9. Richard Ness

    Richard Ness Guest

    If I discovered a business intentionally "jamming" ANY wireless signal,
    they would be IMMEDIATELY reported to the FCC. It is flat out ILLEGAL
    here in the USA.


    "Sandy A. Nicolaysen" <sandynic@verizon.net> wrote in message
    news:pvq6m0hc2hn88sqj5on0k1072all0u0kaq@4ax.com...
    > These things have been in use in Princeton NJ restaurants for a couple
    > of years now. Just wondering how widespread these jammers have
    > become.
    >
    > http://www.globalgadgetuk.com/cell-phone-jammers.htm
    >
    > The reason I ask is because a thread in alt.cellular is debating the
    > use of these jamming devices.
    >
    > There are six restaurants I've visited recently that jam the Verizon
    > signal. The jammers also wipe out Sprint PCS and AT&T GSM signals.
    >
    > I guess you can't depend on wireless in case of emergencies. Oh well,
    > back to giving the babysitter the wired number of the restaurant in
    > case something goes bad.
    >
    > - Sandy
    >
     
  10. Steve Sobol

    Steve Sobol Guest

    George wrote:
    > I would bet that if we were to poll people in the restaurant they would vote
    > to not hear blasting cutsy ringtones and people yelling into phones while
    > eating their dinner. As usual a few rude people ruin it for everyone. Phones
    > have silent modes and voicemail and I don't understand why people don't use
    > them when in a restaurant/movie etc..


    Making rules against cell phone use and kicking people out when they violate
    those rules is OK. Installing a device that jams wireless phone signals is a
    blatant violation of federal law.



    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services, http://JustThe.net/
    Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / 888.480.4NET (4638) / sjsobol@JustThe.net
    PGP Key available from your friendly local key server (0xE3AE35ED)
    Apple Valley, California Nothing scares me anymore. I have three kids.
     
  11. Steve Sobol

    Steve Sobol Guest

    George wrote:
    > I would bet that if we were to poll people in the restaurant they would vote
    > to not hear blasting cutsy ringtones and people yelling into phones while
    > eating their dinner. As usual a few rude people ruin it for everyone. Phones
    > have silent modes and voicemail and I don't understand why people don't use
    > them when in a restaurant/movie etc..


    Making rules against cell phone use and kicking people out when they violate
    those rules is OK. Installing a device that jams wireless phone signals is a
    blatant violation of federal law.



    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services, http://JustThe.net/
    Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / 888.480.4NET (4638) / sjsobol@JustThe.net
    PGP Key available from your friendly local key server (0xE3AE35ED)
    Apple Valley, California Nothing scares me anymore. I have three kids.
     
  12. On Wed, 6 Oct 2004 14:40:53 -0700, "Richard Ness"
    <richard.no@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote:

    >If I discovered a business intentionally "jamming" ANY wireless signal,
    >they would be IMMEDIATELY reported to the FCC. It is flat out ILLEGAL
    >here in the USA.
    >
    >
    >"Sandy A. Nicolaysen" <sandynic@verizon.net> wrote in message
    >news:pvq6m0hc2hn88sqj5on0k1072all0u0kaq@4ax.com...
    >> These things have been in use in Princeton NJ restaurants for a couple
    >> of years now. Just wondering how widespread these jammers have
    >> become.
    >>
    >> http://www.globalgadgetuk.com/cell-phone-jammers.htm
    >>

    Richard: I am on your side with the issue of jamming. My original
    post was whether I am the only person who has noticed their phone
    signal being jammed at certain establishments.

    If you think about "Joe Average", he probably just dismisses the lack
    of signal due to terrain, vicinity, or building materials. The fact
    is that there are businesses that are taking an active approach to
    disabling your phone.

    From a technical standpoint, I don't think much more than a few
    milliwatts would be needed to block signals to cover, say a 50'
    radius.

    My issue with jamming is not about the Feds, but rather being able to
    receive a call should the sh*t hit the fan, regardless of whether it
    is a personal or business crisis.

    BTW, Non-compliance of FFC rules dominates here in NJ. You can buy a
    radar jammer at any truck stop. Commuters use a "garage door opener"
    like device to freeze traffic lights the same as emergency vehicles.
    I have yet to read about a bust for any of these infractions. This is
    like the NJ law "wipers on - lights on". What officer wants to get
    out in the rain to issue a ticket? It's a law with no enforcement.

    Regards, - Sandy
     
  13. On Wed, 6 Oct 2004 14:40:53 -0700, "Richard Ness"
    <richard.no@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote:

    >If I discovered a business intentionally "jamming" ANY wireless signal,
    >they would be IMMEDIATELY reported to the FCC. It is flat out ILLEGAL
    >here in the USA.
    >
    >
    >"Sandy A. Nicolaysen" <sandynic@verizon.net> wrote in message
    >news:pvq6m0hc2hn88sqj5on0k1072all0u0kaq@4ax.com...
    >> These things have been in use in Princeton NJ restaurants for a couple
    >> of years now. Just wondering how widespread these jammers have
    >> become.
    >>
    >> http://www.globalgadgetuk.com/cell-phone-jammers.htm
    >>

    Richard: I am on your side with the issue of jamming. My original
    post was whether I am the only person who has noticed their phone
    signal being jammed at certain establishments.

    If you think about "Joe Average", he probably just dismisses the lack
    of signal due to terrain, vicinity, or building materials. The fact
    is that there are businesses that are taking an active approach to
    disabling your phone.

    From a technical standpoint, I don't think much more than a few
    milliwatts would be needed to block signals to cover, say a 50'
    radius.

    My issue with jamming is not about the Feds, but rather being able to
    receive a call should the sh*t hit the fan, regardless of whether it
    is a personal or business crisis.

    BTW, Non-compliance of FFC rules dominates here in NJ. You can buy a
    radar jammer at any truck stop. Commuters use a "garage door opener"
    like device to freeze traffic lights the same as emergency vehicles.
    I have yet to read about a bust for any of these infractions. This is
    like the NJ law "wipers on - lights on". What officer wants to get
    out in the rain to issue a ticket? It's a law with no enforcement.

    Regards, - Sandy
     
  14. RichC

    RichC Guest

    You forgot unlicensed use of GMRS radios.

    "Sandy A. Nicolaysen" <sandynic@verizon.net> wrote in message
    news:nng9m0hn394acl7647fbo141vrabc19205@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 6 Oct 2004 14:40:53 -0700, "Richard Ness"
    > <richard.no@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote:
    >
    > >If I discovered a business intentionally "jamming" ANY wireless signal,
    > >they would be IMMEDIATELY reported to the FCC. It is flat out ILLEGAL
    > >here in the USA.
    > >
    > >
    > >"Sandy A. Nicolaysen" <sandynic@verizon.net> wrote in message
    > >news:pvq6m0hc2hn88sqj5on0k1072all0u0kaq@4ax.com...
    > >> These things have been in use in Princeton NJ restaurants for a couple
    > >> of years now. Just wondering how widespread these jammers have
    > >> become.
    > >>
    > >> http://www.globalgadgetuk.com/cell-phone-jammers.htm
    > >>

    > Richard: I am on your side with the issue of jamming. My original
    > post was whether I am the only person who has noticed their phone
    > signal being jammed at certain establishments.
    >
    > If you think about "Joe Average", he probably just dismisses the lack
    > of signal due to terrain, vicinity, or building materials. The fact
    > is that there are businesses that are taking an active approach to
    > disabling your phone.
    >
    > From a technical standpoint, I don't think much more than a few
    > milliwatts would be needed to block signals to cover, say a 50'
    > radius.
    >
    > My issue with jamming is not about the Feds, but rather being able to
    > receive a call should the sh*t hit the fan, regardless of whether it
    > is a personal or business crisis.
    >
    > BTW, Non-compliance of FFC rules dominates here in NJ. You can buy a
    > radar jammer at any truck stop. Commuters use a "garage door opener"
    > like device to freeze traffic lights the same as emergency vehicles.
    > I have yet to read about a bust for any of these infractions. This is
    > like the NJ law "wipers on - lights on". What officer wants to get
    > out in the rain to issue a ticket? It's a law with no enforcement.
    >
    > Regards, - Sandy
    >
     
  15. RichC

    RichC Guest

    You forgot unlicensed use of GMRS radios.

    "Sandy A. Nicolaysen" <sandynic@verizon.net> wrote in message
    news:nng9m0hn394acl7647fbo141vrabc19205@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 6 Oct 2004 14:40:53 -0700, "Richard Ness"
    > <richard.no@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote:
    >
    > >If I discovered a business intentionally "jamming" ANY wireless signal,
    > >they would be IMMEDIATELY reported to the FCC. It is flat out ILLEGAL
    > >here in the USA.
    > >
    > >
    > >"Sandy A. Nicolaysen" <sandynic@verizon.net> wrote in message
    > >news:pvq6m0hc2hn88sqj5on0k1072all0u0kaq@4ax.com...
    > >> These things have been in use in Princeton NJ restaurants for a couple
    > >> of years now. Just wondering how widespread these jammers have
    > >> become.
    > >>
    > >> http://www.globalgadgetuk.com/cell-phone-jammers.htm
    > >>

    > Richard: I am on your side with the issue of jamming. My original
    > post was whether I am the only person who has noticed their phone
    > signal being jammed at certain establishments.
    >
    > If you think about "Joe Average", he probably just dismisses the lack
    > of signal due to terrain, vicinity, or building materials. The fact
    > is that there are businesses that are taking an active approach to
    > disabling your phone.
    >
    > From a technical standpoint, I don't think much more than a few
    > milliwatts would be needed to block signals to cover, say a 50'
    > radius.
    >
    > My issue with jamming is not about the Feds, but rather being able to
    > receive a call should the sh*t hit the fan, regardless of whether it
    > is a personal or business crisis.
    >
    > BTW, Non-compliance of FFC rules dominates here in NJ. You can buy a
    > radar jammer at any truck stop. Commuters use a "garage door opener"
    > like device to freeze traffic lights the same as emergency vehicles.
    > I have yet to read about a bust for any of these infractions. This is
    > like the NJ law "wipers on - lights on". What officer wants to get
    > out in the rain to issue a ticket? It's a law with no enforcement.
    >
    > Regards, - Sandy
    >
     
  16. On Sun, 10 Oct 2004 09:00:25 -0400, RichC wrote:

    > You forgot unlicensed use of GMRS radios.


    Another re-birth of the CB band.
     
  17. On Sun, 10 Oct 2004 09:00:25 -0400, RichC wrote:

    > You forgot unlicensed use of GMRS radios.


    Another re-birth of the CB band.
     
  18. On Sun, 10 Oct 2004 09:00:25 -0400, RichC wrote:

    > You forgot unlicensed use of GMRS radios.


    Another re-birth of the CB band.
     
  19. On Thu, 07 Oct 2004 04:33:08 GMT, Sandy A. Nicolaysen wrote:

    > BTW, Non-compliance of FFC rules dominates here in NJ. You can buy a
    > radar jammer at any truck stop. Commuters use a "garage door opener"
    > like device to freeze traffic lights the same as emergency vehicles.
    > I have yet to read about a bust for any of these infractions. This is
    > like the NJ law "wipers on - lights on". What officer wants to get
    > out in the rain to issue a ticket? It's a law with no enforcement.


    The enforcement is there, it's just that the FCC is more interested in
    fining broadcast stations where they can get more money. The Howard Stern
    issue comes to mind.

    FWIW, radar jammers are very ineffective.

    http://www.radar-detectors.com/products/jammers/default.asp
     
  20. On Thu, 07 Oct 2004 04:33:08 GMT, Sandy A. Nicolaysen wrote:

    > BTW, Non-compliance of FFC rules dominates here in NJ. You can buy a
    > radar jammer at any truck stop. Commuters use a "garage door opener"
    > like device to freeze traffic lights the same as emergency vehicles.
    > I have yet to read about a bust for any of these infractions. This is
    > like the NJ law "wipers on - lights on". What officer wants to get
    > out in the rain to issue a ticket? It's a law with no enforcement.


    The enforcement is there, it's just that the FCC is more interested in
    fining broadcast stations where they can get more money. The Howard Stern
    issue comes to mind.

    FWIW, radar jammers are very ineffective.

    http://www.radar-detectors.com/products/jammers/default.asp
     

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