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cell phone use in hospitals

Discussion in 'alt.cellular.verizon' started by maryann, Nov 18, 2003.

  1. Re: Top posting (Was: cell phone use in hospitals)

    David S burbled to the world:

    > In Agent, when you get to the last screen of the post, the next press
    > of the same key you've been using moves you to the next unread post.
    > With PgDn, you have to switch to a different key, or worse, to the
    > mouse.


    Which would be exactly the same way Outlook Express works
    with the spacebar.


    > BTW, Agent's reading pane also functions as a preview pane when you
    > have the focus on the message list pane. Not that I often use it that
    > way...


    Kinda like the way I use Outlook Express.

    Chris
    --

    No one could have a higher opinion of him than I have, and I think he's
    a dirty little beast.
    ---W. S. Gilbert



    › See More: cell phone use in hospitals
  2. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Re: Top posting (Was: cell phone use in hospitals)

    In article <BHEkd.27903$Qv5.9599@newssvr33.news.prodigy.com>,
    John Richards <jr70@blackhole.invalid> wrote:
    >"Al Klein" <rukbat@verizon.org> wrote in message news:e8n5p0hshrk0tnp0oi7mi8dq0p2ghg06vo@4ax.com...
    >> On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 21:06:31 GMT, "John Richards"
    >> <jr70@blackhole.invalid> said in alt.cellular:
    >>
    >>>And 90% of the posters in Microsoft newsgroups top-post, what does that
    >>>tell you?

    >>
    >> That 90% of the posters in Microsoft newsgroups don't follow
    >> convention.

    >
    >That doesn't explain *why* Microsoft posters do so. There must be
    >some intrinsic advantage, or else they wouldn't be doing it.
    >
    >--
    >John Richards



    I recall when bottom reply was the standard form in email.

    When Eudora became popular, with its cursor set to the top and no "don't
    copy" command at the message reply level (elm asks me "copy message?"),
    top reply became popular.

    Top-reply was even called "Eudora-style" in the setup menus of other mail
    programs. Now the trend is back to bottom reply.

    -tc
  3. Re: Top posting (Was: cell phone use in hospitals)

    "Al Klein" <rukbat@verizon.org> wrote in message news:q7e8p0t0ah75h6i768f4fof82ua1l9955p@4ax.com...
    > On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 07:40:17 GMT, "John Richards"
    > <jr70@blackhole.invalid> said in alt.cellular:
    >
    >>"Al Klein" <rukbat@verizon.org> wrote in message news:e8n5p0hshrk0tnp0oi7mi8dq0p2ghg06vo@4ax.com...
    >>> On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 21:06:31 GMT, "John Richards"
    >>> <jr70@blackhole.invalid> said in alt.cellular:

    >
    >>>>And 90% of the posters in Microsoft newsgroups top-post, what does that
    >>>>tell you?

    >
    >>> That 90% of the posters in Microsoft newsgroups don't follow
    >>> convention.

    >
    >>That doesn't explain *why* Microsoft posters do so. There must be
    >>some intrinsic advantage, or else they wouldn't be doing it.

    >
    > The "intrinsic advantage" is that it's easier for those who are too
    > lazy to move their cursors.


    Why would Microsoft engineers and developers necessarily be lazier
    than their non-Microsoft counterparts?

    --
    John Richards
  4. Re: Top posting (Was: cell phone use in hospitals)

    <tedcrum@socrates.Berkeley.EDU> wrote in message news:cn2tg2$6l$1@agate.berkeley.edu...
    >
    > I recall when bottom reply was the standard form in email.
    >
    > When Eudora became popular, with its cursor set to the top and no "don't
    > copy" command at the message reply level (elm asks me "copy message?"),
    > top reply became popular.
    >
    > Top-reply was even called "Eudora-style" in the setup menus of other mail
    > programs. Now the trend is back to bottom reply.


    You see a trend toward bottom-reply in emails? I don't.
    Probably 95% of the emails I see that have multiple responses are
    top-replied.

    --
    John Richards
  5. Re: Top posting

    "Thomas T. Veldhouse" wrote:
    >
    > In alt.cellular.sprintpcs Al Klein <rukbat@verizon.org> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>If the poster's comment is that oblique, AND he quotes more than a
    > >>screenful, you should just skip it and go on to the next post.

    > >
    > > Your experience on usenet is evidently limited to short posts.

    >
    > Actually, I tend to agree .. if somebody can't snip out the irrellavent
    > text, they are lazy and I think that what they have to say must be
    > reflected upon in that light.
    >
    > --
    > Thomas T. Veldhouse
    > Key Fingerprint: 2DB9 813F F510 82C2 E1AE 34D0 D69D 1EDC D5EC AED1
    > Spammers please contact me at renegade@veldy.net.


    You guys are getting rather snotty. I would politely request you take
    your debate out of alt.med.ems. Unless you are the same trolls who have
    been haunting this group for the past many months.

    Dave Scruggs
  6. Al Klein

    Al Klein Guest

    Re: Top posting

    On 12 Nov 2004 14:51:56 GMT, "Thomas T. Veldhouse" <veldy71@yahoo.com>
    said in alt.cellular:

    >In alt.cellular.sprintpcs Al Klein <rukbat@verizon.org> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>If the poster's comment is that oblique, AND he quotes more than a
    >>>screenful, you should just skip it and go on to the next post.

    >>
    >> Your experience on usenet is evidently limited to short posts.

    >
    >Actually, I tend to agree .. if somebody can't snip out the irrellavent
    >text


    You also seem to confuse "long" and "irrelevant". They're not the
    same thing.
  7. Al Klein

    Al Klein Guest

    Re: Top posting (Was: cell phone use in hospitals)

    On Fri, 12 Nov 2004 20:54:43 GMT, "John Richards"
    <jr70@blackhole.invalid> said in alt.cellular:

    >Why would Microsoft engineers and developers necessarily be lazier
    >than their non-Microsoft counterparts?


    Lazier? I think that's the wrong comparative word. :)
  8. Al Klein

    Al Klein Guest

    Re: Top posting (Was: cell phone use in hospitals)

    On Fri, 12 Nov 2004 12:07:59 GMT, David S
    <dwstreeter@spamisnaughty.att.net> said in alt.cellular:

    >In Agent, when you get to the last screen of the post, the next press of
    >the same key you've been using moves you to the next unread post. With
    >PgDn, you have to switch to a different key, or worse, to the mouse.


    If you had checked the headers you would have seen that I use Agent,
    so I know which keys it takes. Try Esc, Down, Enter, which has become
    so automatic for me over the years that I don't even think about it.

    >BTW, Agent's reading pane also functions as a preview pane when you have
    >the focus on the message list pane. Not that I often use it that way...


    I only have one pane showing at a time, and have been running this way
    almost since the beginning.
  9. Al Klein

    Al Klein Guest

    Re: Top posting (Was: cell phone use in hospitals)

    On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 02:13:44 -0700, DevilsPGD <devilspgd@crazyhat.net>
    said in alt.cellular:

    >I've tried most, but so far the only one I really like for general
    >usenet use is Agent.


    I agree, for 2 reasons.

    1) It's a real news client, unlike some other programs.

    2) I've tried other real news clients, but I've used Agent too long to
    be this comfortable with any other client.
  10. Re: Top posting

    David Scruggs <bcfd36@rescuenet.com> wrote:

    >You guys are getting rather snotty. I would politely request you take
    >your debate out of alt.med.ems. Unless you are the same trolls who have
    >been haunting this group for the past many months.


    No, they merely got sucked in by the troll and created an endless thread
    that is definitely cross-posted inappropriately, which is way worse than top
    or bottom posting and exactly what the troll hoped to achieve.

    Yes, I admit to replying on this thread a couple of times myself, but I also
    pointed out several times that it's a troll thread and off-topic for every
    group it's posted to.
  11. David S

    David S Guest

    Re: Top posting (Was: cell phone use in hospitals)

    On Mon, 15 Nov 2004 00:39:02 GMT, Al Klein <rukbat@verizon.org> chose to
    add this to the great equation of life, the universe, and everything:

    >On Fri, 12 Nov 2004 12:07:59 GMT, David S
    ><dwstreeter@spamisnaughty.att.net> said in alt.cellular:
    >
    >>In Agent, when you get to the last screen of the post, the next press of
    >>the same key you've been using moves you to the next unread post. With
    >>PgDn, you have to switch to a different key, or worse, to the mouse.

    >
    >If you had checked the headers you would have seen that I use Agent,
    >so I know which keys it takes. Try Esc, Down, Enter, which has become
    >so automatic for me over the years that I don't even think about it.


    That moves you to the next post in the list, whether or not you've already
    read it. The same thing can be accomplished by just pressing D, if it's
    really what you want to do. To repeat, the single-key-read moves you to the
    next *unread* post (this can also be done by pressing N, which has the
    advantage of being able to skip <space>ing through several screens of
    untrimmed crap following a top post.

    >>BTW, Agent's reading pane also functions as a preview pane when you have
    >>the focus on the message list pane. Not that I often use it that way...

    >
    >I only have one pane showing at a time, and have been running this way
    >almost since the beginning.


    I *never* run Agent with only one pane showing. To each his own, I guess.

    --
    David Streeter, "an internet god" -- Dave Barry
    http://home.att.net/~dwstreeter
    Remove the naughty bit from my address to reply
    Expect a train on ANY track at ANY time.
    "It's a problem, but when the lights go on again people won't be there in
    the dark." - 'President' George W. Bush on the northeast blackout,
    8/14/2003
  12. Gregg Hill

    Gregg Hill Guest

    Re: Top posting (Was: cell phone use in hospitals)

    Hello, John!

    Thanks for the info on the naming of OE's executable. I always wondered why
    it had that name.

    Gregg Hill


    "John Richards" <jr70@blackhole.invalid> wrote in message
    news:pEEkd.27902$Qv5.23202@newssvr33.news.prodigy.com...
    > "Al Klein" <rukbat@verizon.org> wrote in message
    > news:h3n5p0phrjtjfon8p61lfgrn2e6g0pg9oa@4ax.com...
    >> On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 21:51:38 GMT, "John Richards"
    >> <jr70@blackhole.invalid> said in alt.cellular:
    >>
    >>>"Al Klein" <rukbat@verizon.org> wrote in message
    >>>news:1p23p05592ilsjra0sqbqa3vc930qkm5od@4ax.com...
    >>>> Could you name some news clients that have "preview screens"?
    >>>
    >>>The one that is on more computers than any other, Outlook Express

    >>
    >> News clients. OE is an email client.

    >
    > Get off your high horse. OE is an email AND news client. In fact,
    > Microsoft used to call OE "Internet Mail and News" when it came with
    > Windows 95. The executable for OE is still called the same as it was in
    > 1995: msimn.exe, an acronym for Microsoft Internet Mail and News.
    >
    > --
    > John Richards
  13. George

    George Guest

    "John Richards" <jr70@blackhole.invalid> wrote in message
    news:eek:s9fd.13544$Rf1.2273@newssvr19.news.prodigy.com...
    > > Note that the base station was within 3 feet of the patient so the the
    > > signal would have still been pretty high. Another couple of feet and
    > > probably nothing would have happened.

    >
    > The 20 Hz ringing signal is used by landline phones, not by cell phones.
    >

    That also caught my eye.


    > --
    > John Richards
  14. Quick

    Quick Guest

    Steven B. wrote:
    > On Mon, 25 Oct 2004 09:44:54 -0700, "Quick"
    > <quick7135-news@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote:


    Both you and JC Dill missed my point. As I said below:

    >> I think there may well be a need for some to use cells in a hospital
    >> setting. Hospital policy should dictate that. If there are
    >> interference concerns then users should be aware of them.
    >> Your usage might well be included.


    Below I'm referring to other posts which are representative of many
    others (not you) who reason that since they see someone using a cell
    in a hospital that the policy is complete bull.

    >> That doesn't justify the "screw them, they're full if
    >> it with their bogus reasons, I'm going to do as I damn well please"
    >> of anybody walking in the door. Maybe the hospital just wants to
    >> keep the noise down for their patients.

    >
    > Let me say that the so called "Screw You" attitude wasn't my attitude
    > at all and I never use my cellular phone in view of non-hospital
    > personnel such as in elevators or hallways (thus giving others the
    > idea it is okay to ignore hospital policy).


    Yea. I didn't make it very clear to whom I was refering. Sorry.
    One thing you never stated explicitly is that you abide by the
    hospital policy. I have no doubt that you do.

    Someone else said that I assumed that all cell usage in hospitals
    was bad. I didn't and I don't. It is worthwhile/interesting to discuss
    and understand the technical issues of using them around particular
    equipment ( hospitals, air planes, etc.). These discussion are always
    permeated with the likes of "they're just doing it because of this and
    that...", "Here is how I got over on the person enforcing the policy
    and did it anyway", etc.Some hospitals have no policy, some restrict
    it completely, and there is everything in between. Point is that it is the
    policy and the decent thing to do is abide by it. Try to change the
    policy if you don't like it but the "civil disobedience" thing is out of
    line.

    -Quick
  15. JC Dill

    JC Dill Guest

    On Mon, 25 Oct 2004 15:03:48 -0700, "Quick"
    <quick7135-news@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote:

    >Below I'm referring to other posts which are representative of many
    >others (not you) who reason that since they see someone using a cell
    >in a hospital that the policy is complete bull.


    It IS complete bull. They waive the policy in many cases (MDs,
    pacemaker sales reps, etc.), when it serves the hospital's purpose.
    Rather than forumlate a single policy they expect EVERYONE to comply
    with, they have a stupid policy to inconvenience some people for no
    good reason, because "they can".

    jc
  16. DevilsPGD

    DevilsPGD Guest

    John Richards wrote:
    >>The unit had self test circuits that it ran every so often. If these
    >>self test circuits detected at 20 Hz signal that lasted 2 seconds, it
    >>would declare a fault and shut down. Guess what frequency and at what
    >>duration a telephone ring might be... 20 Hz and 2 seconds. The unit
    >>detected the signal and declared the fault. Just because it was not
    >>running a test at the time did not stop the error detection circuits
    >>from functioning. All we needed to do was cycle power and the fault
    >>would have been cleared.
    >>
    >>Note that the base station was within 3 feet of the patient so the the
    >>signal would have still been pretty high. Another couple of feet and
    >>probably nothing would have happened.

    >
    > The 20 Hz ringing signal is used by landline phones, not by cell phones.


    Lets not do anything silly like introduce facts into a usenet argument.


    --
    Failure is not an option. It's bundled with your software.
  17. JoshIII

    JoshIII Guest

    Ever hear about a of a TV set (Toshiba) emitting interference that gets
    picked up by a polar orbiting satellite? Then read this:

    http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tm...ggerssatelliterescuesystemfccinvestigates&e=1


    Wonder if they put these Toshiba TV sets in hospitals?

    JoshIII
    josh3i@hotmail.com
    http://profiles.yahoo.com/tracfonegenius
    Getting a TracFone soon? Get an email referral by another TracFone
    user *BEFORE* you activate, and you will both get 100 Free Minutes!
    What other prepaid plan offers free anytime minutes? TracFone uses
    Cingular, Verizon, Alltel, Suncom, and AT&T networks, just to name a few.




    "DevilsPGD" <devilspgd@crazyhat.net> wrote in message
    news:10nqukptm2d7k2d@news.supernews.com...
    > Lets not do anything silly like introduce facts into a usenet argument.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Failure is not an option. It's bundled with your software.
  18. me

    me Guest

    "JoshIII" <josh3iREMOVE@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:2u5hrfF247nsiU1@uni-berlin.de:

    > Ever hear about a of a TV set (Toshiba) emitting interference that
    > gets picked up by a polar orbiting satellite? Then read this:
    >
    > http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/space/20041025/sc_space/
    > manstvtriggerssatelliterescuesystemfccinvestigates&e=1
    >
    >
    > Wonder if they put these Toshiba TV sets in hospitals?
    >


    I was in the hospital for 2 days emailing and going to the web on my phone.
    No one said a word
  19. Bill T wrote:
    >


    [stuff deleted]

    >
    > 20 Hz?? That's audio, not cellular-signal interference. What if a landline
    > phone with a deep ring had gone off instead?


    No, there was 20 Hz EMI being broadcast. Whether it was by the base
    station, or some type of pseudo ringer mechanism that was "leaking" I
    don't know.

    I will admit that the problem was not cellular. But it was wireless. The
    ringer tones in a cell phone are definately not broadcast. My only point
    was that I actually saw a medical instrument interfered with by a
    wireless technology.

    D. Scruggs
    Boulder Creek Fire
  20. DevilsPGD wrote:
    >
    > John Richards wrote:
    > >>The unit had self test circuits that it ran every so often. If these
    > >>self test circuits detected at 20 Hz signal that lasted 2 seconds, it
    > >>would declare a fault and shut down. Guess what frequency and at what
    > >>duration a telephone ring might be... 20 Hz and 2 seconds. The unit
    > >>detected the signal and declared the fault. Just because it was not
    > >>running a test at the time did not stop the error detection circuits
    > >>from functioning. All we needed to do was cycle power and the fault
    > >>would have been cleared.
    > >>
    > >>Note that the base station was within 3 feet of the patient so the the
    > >>signal would have still been pretty high. Another couple of feet and
    > >>probably nothing would have happened.

    > >
    > > The 20 Hz ringing signal is used by landline phones, not by cell phones.

    >
    > Lets not do anything silly like introduce facts into a usenet argument.
    >


    I'm not sure what you are saying here. I never said it wasn't a land
    line. It was. With a wireless handset operating at 49.? MHz. Are you
    saying it WASN'T the ringing phone that caused the fault?

    D. Scruggs

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