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cell phone use in hospitals

Discussion in 'alt.cellular.verizon' started by maryann, Nov 18, 2003.

  1. "Bill Roland" <donotspammeplease@cox.net> wrote in message
    news:xADub.7066$zx.1846@lakeread03...
    > Which is funny, I've seen many cell phones kick into Analog when inside

    the
    > hospital. I've seen at least 5 StarTACs do it...
    >


    But your startac does not output 3 watts of power like the old bag phones.

    Tom Veldhouse
     



    › See More: cell phone use in hospitals
  2. The thing that is so funny is getting screeched at by one hospital
    worker for merely having one (that was indeed turned off) as two others in
    the same area are using theirs. When I asked, I was told they were "special"
    ones that are safe. Hmm, looked just like the ones I had.

    Some of them even ban pagers. Of course, all of the docs and staff have
    pagers.

    Mind you, I do suspect that some equipment could be affected and that
    patients come first, but a lot of this is just knee jerk.

    --
    Thomas M. Goethe

    "Orac" <orac@wlsfanmail.com> wrote in message
    news:eek:rac-E3CC84.08104119112003@host9.newsfeeds.com...
    > In article <17f585bf.0311182050.13162875@posting.google.com>,
    > maryann@netzoola.com (maryann) wrote:
    >
    > > There was a thread here a few months ago about cell phone use in
    > > hospitals, with plenty of self righteous talk about the "dangers"
    > > to the patients.
    > >
    > > I spent all of today in John Muir Hospital waiting for the gf to come

    out
    > > of surgery, and noticed that each and every hospital employee appears to
    > > be equipped with a cell phone. Needless to say, they
    > > seem to think they won't kill the patients that way.

    >
    > I'm in the health care and have worked in various hospitals around the
    > country over the last 15 years or so. In my experience, it's highly
    > variable what hospitals allow. Of the two hospitals where I have
    > privileges, one lets you use cell phones essentially anywhere in the
    > building, even in the ICUs and Recovery Room, and the other is very
    > restrictive, only allowing cell phones in certain designated waiting
    > areas. As part of my duties, I've had to visit hospitals throughout the
    > state, and I've found the same variability in terms of allowing cell
    > phone use, although few are as liberal as the hospital that allows them
    > nearly everywhere. This variability has made me wonder whether today's
    > cell phones actually can interfere with the functioning of patient
    > equipment. If the case were so clear-cut, I would think that all
    > hospitals would ban cell phone use anywhere near patient care areas.
    > --
    > Orac |"A statement of fact cannot be insolent."
    > |
    > |"If you cannot listen to the answers, why do you
    > | inconvenience me with questions?"
     
  3. MD

    MD Guest

    > Nextel phones still play havoc with some poorly shielded electronic
    > devices.


    I have often seen Nextel and GSM phones cause interference with the
    equipment in a recording studio. Then again, last time I was at a
    hospital the staff used cheap FRS radios!
     
  4. Bill Roland

    Bill Roland Guest

    I have 3 of those too, maybe I should haul one in and see what happens. No,
    I won't, but I bet it would wreak havoc on a lot of stuff around there. I
    do what the hospital politely asks, I turn my cell phone off at the door,
    but most people I know do not. The behavior of most Dual Mode phones I have
    seen is that the moment you walk in the hospital it switches to Analog with
    a very low signal, then you hit spots inside that have no service, others
    where you may have full strength, but its always Analog. The moment you
    step out the doors it returns to digital. I cannot explain it but it
    happens every time.

    Also, a few years back I had an aunt that had surgery at North Florida
    Regional in Gainesville. At the time they had, and still did have a few
    months ago when I was by there, a cell tower on top of the hospital. Not
    sure how good that is for all that sensitive equipment they are operating
    below...but that's their problem.

    "Thomas T. Veldhouse" <veldy71@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:3fbb7aad$0$41288$a1866201@newsreader.visi.com...
    >
    > "Bill Roland" <donotspammeplease@cox.net> wrote in message
    > news:xADub.7066$zx.1846@lakeread03...
    > > Which is funny, I've seen many cell phones kick into Analog when inside

    > the
    > > hospital. I've seen at least 5 StarTACs do it...
    > >

    >
    > But your startac does not output 3 watts of power like the old bag phones.
    >
    > Tom Veldhouse
    >
    >
     
  5. In alt.cellular Thomas M. Goethe <xspamgoethe11xxxxxx@lycos.com> wrote:
    > The thing that is so funny is getting screeched at by one hospital
    > worker for merely having one (that was indeed turned off) as two others in
    > the same area are using theirs. When I asked, I was told they were "special"
    > ones that are safe. Hmm, looked just like the ones I had.
    >
    > Some of them even ban pagers. Of course, all of the docs and staff have
    > pagers.


    I know that back home, the hospital near our house banned two-way pagers.
    They care about the transmission of radio waves, apparently, but not the
    reception of the RF on the paging frequencies. Cell phones are prohibited
    at this particular hospital.

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services
    22674 Motnocab Road * Apple Valley, CA 92307-1950
    Steve Sobol, Proprietor
    888.480.4NET (4638) * 248.724.4NET * sjsobol@JustThe.net
     
  6. "Hank Arnold" <rasilon@aol.com> wrote in message
    news:9GFub.838$nE6.453898@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
    > What is the BFD????????? The hospitals ask that you don't use a cell phone
    > in the hospital. You can do without it while you are there.... We lived
    > without it for this long. Just turn it off and concentrate on what is
    > important. The health of your loved ones....


    Concentrating on the health of your loved one is exactly why you need a CDMA
    phone in a hospital! In the hospital, your loved one is being bombarded
    with "treatment" (drugs, etc.) by various bizarre doctors who come by once a
    day (maybe), order some drugs, and leave. When you find your loved one all
    goofed up (catatonic or comatose), and the nurses don't seem to care, you
    have to track down these bizarre doctors as quickly as possible and get them
    to change their orders. Obviously, you cannot get such a doctor on the
    phone immediately--you have to leave a callback number. That's what you
    need a CDMA phone for.

    Yes, this scenario did occur when my mother was in the hospital.
    Unfortunately, the doctors were so incompetent that they put my mother not
    only into a coma but into permanent kidney failure and brain damage. She
    never fully recovered, and died within six months.
     
  7. "Orac" <orac@wlsfanmail.com> wrote in message
    news:eek:rac-E3CC84.08104119112003@host9.newsfeeds.com...
    > nearly everywhere. This variability has made me wonder whether today's
    > cell phones actually can interfere with the functioning of patient
    > equipment. If the case were so clear-cut, I would think that all
    > hospitals would ban cell phone use anywhere near patient care areas.


    The only evidence at all I've seen of interference with sensitive equipment
    (e.g., avionics) was:

    1) Within twelve inches of the equipment

    2) single-frequency technology (analog/TDMA/GSM) instead of spread-spectrum
    (CDMA)
     
  8. Evan Platt

    Evan Platt Guest

    On Wed, 19 Nov 2003 06:12:48 GMT, Lawrence Glasser
    <lglasser@spamcop.net> wrote:

    >I sense a morgue joke coming up...



    !!!DO NOT READ IF YOU ARE EASILY OFFENDED!!!












    What did the two necrophiliacs say to one another?


    Let's go out and grab a cold one.
    To e-mail me, remove theobvious from my e-mail address.
     
  9. "Lawrence G. Mayka" wrote:
    >
    > "Orac" <orac@wlsfanmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:eek:rac-E3CC84.08104119112003@host9.newsfeeds.com...
    > > nearly everywhere. This variability has made me wonder whether today's
    > > cell phones actually can interfere with the functioning of patient
    > > equipment. If the case were so clear-cut, I would think that all
    > > hospitals would ban cell phone use anywhere near patient care areas.

    >
    > The only evidence at all I've seen of interference with sensitive equipment
    > (e.g., avionics) was:
    >
    > 1) Within twelve inches of the equipment
    >
    > 2) single-frequency technology (analog/TDMA/GSM) instead of spread-spectrum
    > (CDMA)


    One concern is the age of the hospital's monitoring/telemetry system.

    I'd image an older system is *much* more prone to interference.

    Larry
     
  10. SAA

    SAA Guest

    They are probably acting on anecdotal evidence. All it takes is a
    couple if incidents that is, rightly or wrongly, blamed on cell phones
    and the story spreads. After all if you missed something on a readout
    would you take the blame or try to pin it on something you had no
    control over such as a cell phone.

    I was recently in the hospital as part of my work. I had a handheld
    radio that puts out a lot more energy than my cell phone does and the
    frequency is in the same neigborhood as my cell phone (the range on
    the handheld radio is in excess of 20 miles). Only one of the nurses
    had a problem with me using my cell phone and none of them had any
    problems with me using my heandheld radio which between the two, the
    handheld radio would likely cause much more interference than a cell
    phone.




    On Wed, 19 Nov 2003 16:31:28 GMT, "Lawrence G. Mayka"
    <lgmayka000@ameritech.net> wrote:

    >"Hank Arnold" <rasilon@aol.com> wrote in message
    >news:9GFub.838$nE6.453898@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
    >> What is the BFD????????? The hospitals ask that you don't use a cell phone
    >> in the hospital. You can do without it while you are there.... We lived
    >> without it for this long. Just turn it off and concentrate on what is
    >> important. The health of your loved ones....

    >
    >Concentrating on the health of your loved one is exactly why you need a CDMA
    >phone in a hospital! In the hospital, your loved one is being bombarded
    >with "treatment" (drugs, etc.) by various bizarre doctors who come by once a
    >day (maybe), order some drugs, and leave. When you find your loved one all
    >goofed up (catatonic or comatose), and the nurses don't seem to care, you
    >have to track down these bizarre doctors as quickly as possible and get them
    >to change their orders. Obviously, you cannot get such a doctor on the
    >phone immediately--you have to leave a callback number. That's what you
    >need a CDMA phone for.
    >
    >Yes, this scenario did occur when my mother was in the hospital.
    >Unfortunately, the doctors were so incompetent that they put my mother not
    >only into a coma but into permanent kidney failure and brain damage. She
    >never fully recovered, and died within six months.
    >
     
  11. Anon

    Anon Guest

    I don't know how critical the issue is but wouldn't you rather err on the
    safe side? It's a toy/status symbol to 99.9% of people so I don't think it's
    going to kill the able-bodied to shut off their cell for a little while.
    Common courtesy seems to be a dying breed.
     
  12. Michael

    Michael Guest

    On Wed, 19 Nov 2003 17:54:17 GMT, "Anon" <anon@anon.net> wrote:

    >I don't know how critical the issue is but wouldn't you rather err on the
    >safe side? It's a toy/status symbol to 99.9% of people so I don't think it's
    >going to kill the able-bodied to shut off their cell for a little while.
    >Common courtesy seems to be a dying breed.





    Instead of arguing back and forth over whether phones cause what
    read all about it. Someone else gave this link:

    http://www.howstuffworks.com/question230.htm
     
  13. Zak Dingle

    Zak Dingle Guest

    "maryann" <maryann@netzoola.com> wrote in message
    news:17f585bf.0311182050.13162875@posting.google.com...
    >
    > I spent all of today in John Muir Hospital waiting for the gf to come out
    > of surgery, and noticed that each and every hospital employee appears to
    > be equipped with a cell phone. Needless to say, they
    > seem to think they won't kill the patients that way.


    The use of cellular phones here in UK hospitals, has been banned for years!

    HTH
    tox
     
  14. "Michael" <mfrazier2@mail.com> wrote in message
    news:djdnrvo95e6qohgltu0n7objnjqv75o8mr@4ax.com...
    > Instead of arguing back and forth over whether phones cause what
    > read all about it. Someone else gave this link:
    >
    > http://www.howstuffworks.com/question230.htm


    This article is extremely amateurish and/or outdated. The very fact that it
    mentions cell phone power as 3W (which was *never* true of handheld phones,
    only car phones and bag phones) indicates that the author actually knows
    very little about the subject.

    More importantly, though, any such interference argument is (a) hypothetical
    unless evidence is presented, and (b) not applicable to CDMA (spread
    spectrum), which is a military-class technology designed to be practically
    indetectible to any equipment not specifically designed to detect it.
     
  15. Peter Pan

    Peter Pan Guest

    "Lawrence G. Mayka" <lgmayka000@ameritech.net> wrote in message
    news:dhQub.873$aw2.595468@newssrv26.news.prodigy.com...
    > "Michael" <mfrazier2@mail.com> wrote in message
    > news:djdnrvo95e6qohgltu0n7objnjqv75o8mr@4ax.com...
    > > Instead of arguing back and forth over whether phones cause what
    > > read all about it. Someone else gave this link:
    > >
    > > http://www.howstuffworks.com/question230.htm

    >
    > This article is extremely amateurish and/or outdated. The very fact that

    it
    > mentions cell phone power as 3W (which was *never* true of handheld

    phones,
    > only car phones and bag phones) indicates that the author actually knows
    > very little about the subject.
    >
    > More importantly, though, any such interference argument is (a)

    hypothetical
    > unless evidence is presented, and (b) not applicable to CDMA (spread
    > spectrum), which is a military-class technology designed to be practically
    > indetectible to any equipment not specifically designed to detect it.
    >
    >


    Sorry Lawrence, you are totally off your rocker on this one. Whenever my
    friend came over with his cell phone I knew he was there before he came to
    the door cause the radio and TV would start getting interference every few
    minutes from his cell phone checking in, I would say your (A) is totally
    false.
     
  16. Mark Allread

    Mark Allread Guest

    On Wed, 19 Nov 2003 16:36:19 GMT, Lawrence G. Mayka
    <lgmayka000@ameritech.net> wrote:


    > The only evidence at all I've seen of interference with sensitive
    > equipment
    > (e.g., avionics) was:
    >
    > 1) Within twelve inches of the equipment
    >
    > 2) single-frequency technology (analog/TDMA/GSM) instead of
    > spread-spectrum
    > (CDMA)


    Have you ever been in an "all occupants killed" plane crash? Shall
    we take that as evidence that they don't happen?

    --
    Mark
     
  17. There used to be signs at the doors of hospitals warning about cell phones.
    I have not seen these, recently.

    Like another contributor to these forums, I see a lot of communication
    devices carried by hospital employees. However, they appear to be VHF
    commercial walkie-talkie units.

    And, as someone pointed out, shielding makes it a moot point in many areas
    of a medical facility. I volunter as a driver for the American Cancer
    Society, and frequently am at the radiation department. Signals are dismal.
    By the way, I experience the same situation in some bank buildings.

    -Paul-

    ________________________________
    Note to my friends:
    If I am in the hospital, forget the cards and
    flowers. I want a pizza and a get-away car!
    ________________________________
     
  18. J Oat

    J Oat Guest

    Lawrence,
    save your breaths, most people do not want to know. ignorant is bless

    btw i agree with your view. CDMA radiate the least and GSM the most at
    their peak output of 2W I think, even though the average power output is
    comparable to CDMA.

    "Lawrence G. Mayka" <lgmayka000@ameritech.net> wrote in message
    news:dhQub.873$aw2.595468@newssrv26.news.prodigy.com...
    > "Michael" <mfrazier2@mail.com> wrote in message
    > news:djdnrvo95e6qohgltu0n7objnjqv75o8mr@4ax.com...
    > > Instead of arguing back and forth over whether phones cause what
    > > read all about it. Someone else gave this link:
    > >
    > > http://www.howstuffworks.com/question230.htm

    >
    > This article is extremely amateurish and/or outdated. The very fact that

    it
    > mentions cell phone power as 3W (which was *never* true of handheld

    phones,
    > only car phones and bag phones) indicates that the author actually knows
    > very little about the subject.
    >
    > More importantly, though, any such interference argument is (a)

    hypothetical
    > unless evidence is presented, and (b) not applicable to CDMA (spread
    > spectrum), which is a military-class technology designed to be practically
    > indetectible to any equipment not specifically designed to detect it.
    >
    >
     
  19. Maryann,

    > Needless to say, they
    > seem to think they won't kill the patients that way.
    >

    Another possible conclusion: the more health problems patients have, the
    more business hospitals get. It probably is not the low level employees that
    want to carry cell phones, but those who get the most benefit from the
    number of patient-days they sell.

    Marvin L. Zinn
    marvinlzinn@mindspring.com
    Using Virtual Access
    Windows 2000 build 2600
     
  20. Mark Kim

    Mark Kim Guest

    In general, employees aren't supposed to be carrying cellular devices,
    Nextel iDEN Devices, SouthernLINC iDEN Devices, whatever you name it
    because typically, I consider cell phone carriage in hospitals a little
    bit unreligious IMO. Entering a hospital, you usually supposed to turn
    the Cell Phone off since Cell Phones uses Microwave Transmissions, so I
    would say this seems to be a little bit overboard to use Cell Phones in
    Hospitals.

    Remember that all hospitalic organizations have different rules.

    maryann wrote:

    > There was a thread here a few months ago about cell phone use in
    > hospitals, with plenty of self righteous talk about the "dangers"
    > to the patients.
    >
    > I spent all of today in John Muir Hospital waiting for the gf to come out
    > of surgery, and noticed that each and every hospital employee appears to
    > be equipped with a cell phone. Needless to say, they
    > seem to think they won't kill the patients that way.
     

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