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How-to Connect to the Voyager 2.5 mm Headset Jack

Discussion in 'LG Voyager' started by WiredNot, Jan 30, 2009.

  1. WiredNot

    WiredNot New Member

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    Greetings,

    As a new LG Voyager Titanium owner, I wanted to know how to connect a decent pair of wired headphones to it. One of the reasons I selected the Voyager is for its capability as a music player. The headphone amp inside it isn't very powerful but with an efficient and high quality set of headphones it sounds very good. I connected a pair of Sennheiser HD-280 professional headphones and was very pleasantly surprised at the good sound quality.

    Sadly, stories are circulating about the Voyager having mediocre or worse sound. I believe this is usually the fault of poor headphone/earphone selection (they need to be efficient or you'll push the Voyager into distortion if you turn its volume to the maximum setting) and/or the headphones/earphones are connected incorrectly.

    In this topic I'll explain how the headset jack of the LG Voyager works and the kind of adapter that you'll need for it if you want to plug in a great pair of headphones or earphones. It's going to get technical so if you're not comfortable with audio wiring, you might want to skip this topic and get someone to help you.


    Terminology
    Please forgive me for starting with terminology but we have to because the terms we need to use have been seriously muddled.
    • Phone Plug -- The male connector on the end of a headset or headphone cable that you plug into your cell phone. The male connector is always called the "plug". As for the label "phone", I'm not sure where it came from. It could refer to the kinds of plugs used decades ago with ancient telephone switchboards where operators physically plugged and unplugged telephone lines to route calls. If this is where it came from then "phone" is simply short for "telephone". But it could also have originated with common "headphones" which popularized the phone connector in modern times. Phone plugs have been used for making audio connections for decades in the pro audio industry. In addition to headphones, they're used for microphones and musical instruments like electric guitars. So, depending on who you talk to, "phone plug" may bring "headphones" or "telephones" to mind. The standard phone plug is 1/4 inch in diameter and is usually called a "1/4-inch phone plug".
    • Phone Jack -- The female connector that a phone plug connects to. Usually, phone jacks are mounted into audio equipment (chassis mount) rather than on the end of a cable (in-line connector). But adapters often have in-line phone jacks. The chassis mount variety appear simply as a hole and the in-line variety appear as a hollow tube with a hole in one end. Female connectors are always "jacks" but you'll frequently see people call them plugs by mistake.
    • Headphones / Earphones -- Headphones usually rest on or encircle your ears. Earphones usually fit into your ear. They both allow you to listen only. Headphones and earphones do not have a microphone so you can't talk to a caller with them. They can be mono or stereo.
    • Headsets -- Add a microphone to headphones or earphones and you have a headset. They let you listen and talk. You need a headset if you want to handle calls. The headphone/earphone part of a headset can be either mono or stereo. If you see only one ear piece then you know its mono. But you can't be sure if you see two because some headsets have two ear pieces but each one gets the same signal and is therefore "mono". In order for it to be a "stereo" headset each ear piece must receive a different signal. The surest way to tell them apart is to look at the headset's phone plug and see how many poles it has (more on that below).
    • 3.5 mm Phone Plug/Jack -- The 1/4-inch phone connector was reduced to a smaller size with a 3.5 mm (1/8 inch) diameter and is usually called a "mini phone" plug or jack. However, manufacturers are not consistent and you'll sometimes see them with other names. The safest thing is to always refer to them by their diameter (3.5 mm). The 3.5 mm phone plug is the size that you'll find nowadays on most stereo headphones and earphones. Most mp3 music players have 3.5 mm phone jacks.
    • 2.5 mm Phone Plug/Jack -- The 1/4-inch phone connector was reduced even smaller to a diameter of 2.5 mm and is often called a "micro-mini phone" or just "micro phone" plug or jack. However, as with the "mini phone" connectors above, their names are not used consistently and you'll see them called other things as well. Again, the safest thing to do is to always refer to them by their diameter (2.5 mm). The 2.5 mm phone jack is popular on telephones and this is the size provided on the right side of your Voyager. It's purpose on the Voyager is so you can connect a wired stereo headset.
    • 2-Pole, 3-Pole, 4-Pole -- The type of device you plan to connect will determine the number of electrical connections that will be needed. The simplist would be a mono headphone and it would need two wires or two connections. Electrical engineers call them "2 poles". Normally each signal requires one separate "+" wire that only connects to it and a common "-" wire shared by all the other signals. Understanding how many poles (or wires) your Voyager connector needs is vital to making a proper connection. The Voyager has a 4-pole 2.5 mm phone jack because it is designed for a stereo headset. It will need one wire each for: (1) mic, (2) left ear, (3) right ear, (4) common. If you insert a plug with fewer poles, you'll short-circuit part of your phone's connector and this may damage your phone, cause it to shut off or operate improperly. An improperly wired adapter can be just a dangerous.
    [​IMG]
    One of the most important things to realize is that if you plug a common mono headset with a 3-pole 2.5 mm phone plug into your Voyager, you'll be short-circuiting part of its 4-pole 2.5 mm phone jack. The same is true if you plug an adapter with a 3-pole 2.5 mm phone plug into your Voyager. Your Voyager needs a 4-pole 2.5 mm phone plug. All you need to do is read the problems people have been having with their phones shutting down and malfunctioning to realize that this is not a good idea.


    Wiring
    The following image shows how a stereo headset plug must be wired for proper operation with an LG Voyager.
    [​IMG]
    Notice above that the different contacts of a phone plug are labeled "tip", "ring" and "sleeve" and 4-pole plugs like the one required by the Voyager have two rings.

    Another thing to realize is that not every telephone with a 4-pole 2.5 mm stereo headset phone jack like the Voyager will use the same wiring and LG appears to be out of step with some of the other manufacturers. This means that some third-party adapters will cause you to hear the left channel in the right ear and visa versa. This won't hurt your phone or your headphones/earphones but it may be annoying---especially if you can't reverse the headphones/earphones on your head.


    Ready-Made Adapters
    If you want to connect your high-quality headphones or earphones with a common 3-pole 3.5 mm phone plug to your Voyager, the easiest solution is to use an LG adapter. One popular choice is the LG SGEY0003602 Headset. It comes with an adapter and a cheap pair of earbud-style earphones. You can unplug the cheap earphones and plug in a high-quality pair of your own choosing. Plus the adapter plug contains a built-in microphone, call answer button and a headphone volume control. So you can also take calls while wearing your headphones. I've got one and it works pretty good---especially for its low cost (they often sell for under $15 and I've found them on eBay for under $10).

    Purists who want the best sound possible for listening to their favorite music may not want the mic or volume control in line with their headphones. I found that the Cingular Headset Adapter works great. It has a simple in-line 3-pole 3.5 mm stereo headphone jack at one end and a 4-pole 2.5 mm stereo headset plug at the other. It has no volume control and no provision for a microphone. In fact, the microphone connection on the 2.5 mm phone plug simply doesn't connect to anything. The package says it's compatible with the ROKR E1 telephone. But guess what?---it's also compatible with the Voyager (I know because I have one of these adapters, too). I've also been told that Motorola makes a similar compatible adapter but I haven't been able to confirm this yet.


    Custom Adapters
    With the information shown below, you can make your own adapter. Consider this: Some of the best headsets are now made for the PC multiplayer gaming industry. In fact, Sennheiser has a PC350 that is stellar. The headphone part has the quality of their best professional headphones and the microphone is equally impressive. But the sad thing is they are only available with connectors for hooking to computer sound cards. This means that they have two connectors: A 3.5 mm phone plug for the headphone part and a separate 3.5 mm phone plug for the microphone. It wouldn't be too difficult for someone to make an adapter that would allow you to plug one of those bad boys into a Voyager. And if the PC350 is too expensive for you, then consider some of the less expensive models such as the PC151 (closed back) or PC161 (open air) headset.

    [​IMG]
    As you can probably tell, I'm partial to Sennheiser; however, the same principles described in this topic will work for other brands and models.

    Note: I prepared the drawings in this message to be life size if your computer display has a resolution of 72 pixels per inch (ppi). Permission is hereby granted for you to copy my drawings and use them freely as long as you do not change them or remove my copyright notice.

    Enjoy!
    WiredNot
     



    › See More: Connect to the Voyager 2.5 mm Headset Jack
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2009
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  2. jdeg

    jdeg Administrator Staff Member

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    Re: How to Connect to the Voyager 2.5 mm Headset Jack

    Thanks for this post! It's quite informative! I've stickied it in the forum.
     
  3. lcp

    lcp New Member

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    Re: How to Connect to the Voyager 2.5 mm Headset Jack

    I just bought an LG Dare and when I asked if it had a standard headphone jack I was told yes. I thought a standard was the 2.5mm, not 3.5mm. I can't wear earbuds so have to wear a headset (for phoneuse) but how do I go about finding one that fits a 3.5mm jack? Any suggestions?
    Your post was very thorough but it goes opposite to what I am looking for.

    Thanks
     
  4. nicknrm

    nicknrm Super Moderator

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    Re: How to Connect to the Voyager 2.5 mm Headset Jack

    The standard headset jack for a wireless phone is 2.5mm. The problem is very few other electronics (besides phones) use 2.5mm. You won't find an iPod using a 2.5mm jack. Then the wireless industry thought "What if we made our phones use the standard 2.5mm jack". This began to happen about a year ago and now more and more phones have a 3.5mm jack...but the 2.5mm is considered standard for a phone.

    The manufacturers who make the headsets/earbud headsets have not quite caught up with the phones and the 3.5mm headset jack. It isn't likely you will ever find a headset that already has a 3.5mm adapter. You would need to get a 2.5mm to 3.5mm headset jack from the carrier. Here's one for Verizon Wireless: 2.5 to 3.5 converter


     
  5. WiredNot

    WiredNot New Member

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    Re: How to Connect to the Voyager 2.5 mm Headset Jack

    Hi lcp,

    It's difficult to understand what you want because it seems like you and the salesman are confusing headphones and headsets. The LG Dare does NOT appear to have a 3.5 mm headphone jack at all. Rather, (if the product description provided by Verizon is accurate) it has a 3.5 mm headset jack. Furthermore, it appears that its headset jack is stereo since the phone functions as a music player.

    Headphones and earphones do not have microphones. Headsets have microphones and therefore require plugs with an additional "pole" for the microphone. Note: Even if earbuds are employed, the device is still called a "headset" if it includes a microphone. All of them are available in either mono or stereo and you can't plug a mono device plug into a complementary stereo jack without short-circuiting something.

    The adapter that nicknrm listed is only for headsets. According to the link he provided, Verizon claims that it works with either "standard" (mono) or "stereo" headsets. The "standard" headset would have a 2.5 mm 3-pole plug and the stereo headset would have a 2.5 mm 4-pole plug. While it is possible for one adapter to serve both, I'm skeptical that it will handle a "standard" mono headset properly. Unless it has isolation transformers, it will probably allow a "standard" headset to short-circuit part of the 3.5 mm stereo headset jack of the phone. And the photo of the adapter shows that there is no room for isolation transformers.

    You could not use the phone's 3.5 mm headset jack with a pair of headphones or earphones without a special adapter (a different one than the one nicknrm listed). This makes the move to a 3.5 mm headset jack look like a total waste to me.


    If I were making a killer multimedia phone what I would do is include two jacks:
    1. One 3.5 mm 3-pole stereo headphone/earphone jack which you could use to connect nearly any pair of stereo headphones or earphones for listening to music (no microphone and no talking). No adapter would be required.
    2. One 2.5 mm 4-pole stereo headset jack the same as my LG Voyager. This would support both headsets and headphones/earphones with appropriate adapters. This would provide backward compatibility with existing LG 2.5 mm stereo headsets and adapters.
    This would cover all of your bases and provide great capability with a minimum of adapters. It would make it easy to use the phone as a music player without requiring an adapter for any of the hundreds of headphones and earphones currently available. Or you could plug in a stereo headset for handling calls and listening to stereo music simultaneously under program control.

    Instead, it appears that LG has created a non-standard jack for the Dare that almost no one supports yet. Why would they add to the confusion? It doesn't make sense to me ... unless LG has invented a configurable jack that can be dynamically rewired by the phone to match the wiring of the plug you've inserted into the jack. Such things are possible---but I think they would be too expensive both in terms of cost and space.

    A darker purpose would be to force the buyer to purchase an expensive LG headset with a requisite non-standard plug. That's the kind of behavior that I would expect from Sony---not LG.

    Finally, there is another possibility: LG's product information for the Dare could be wrong. It wouldn't be the first time that a company labelled a headphone jack as a headset jack or visa versa. I've seen so many errors of this sort on product packaging that I've lost count.

    Best regards, WiredNot
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2009
  6. lcp

    lcp New Member

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    Re: How to Connect to the Voyager 2.5 mm Headset Jack

    Thanks. I am confused and very frustrated at this point.

    Nicknrm, thanks for the link to Verizon - I tried that but since I am located in Canada I could not get past the zipcode page.

    WiredNot, I took a closer look to what is provided by LG - here in Canada Telus carries this phone. Anyways, The LG Dare has a 3.5mm jack . The Headset/eadphone buds combo comes in 2 pieces that can be taken apart - not sure why. One piece has a 3.5mm 4 pole piece with a volume control, the volume control is a female piece; the second part has another 3.5mm 3pole plug that inserts into the volume control - I've taken a picture and added it. To top it off, I actuall called LG today to ask what I could do to use a wired headset - they informed me they don't have one - just these earbuds (which due to my ears I can't wear any buds!). So I am feeling completely stuck.
     

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  7. WiredNot

    WiredNot New Member

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    Re: How to Connect to the Voyager 2.5 mm Headset Jack

    Hi lcp,

    Judging by your photo, your headgear consists of two parts:

    First are the earbud-style earphones which have a 3.5 mm 3-pole phone plug. These appear to be standard stereo earphones and this is great news for you. You should be able to substitute any common pair of headphones or earphones in their place. This is probably why they provided two pieces---so the earphone/headphone part would be "normal" and could be changed by the user.

    Second is the adapter with volume control that connects your headphones/earphones to your LG Dare. It has two connectors: [1] an in-line 3.5 mm 3-pole phone jack (to accept the headphone/earphone plug), and [2] a 3.5 mm 4-pole phone plug (to connect to your phone). But I can't say any more without seeing some better photos of the in-line phone jack (the barrel end that the earphones plug into).

    The volume control is for the headphones/earphones. What we need to know now is: "Is there a microphone in it also?" If there is, then you will see one or more holes for it at the top of the connector and you would expect to see a push-to-talk button to allow you to answer or hang up a call. Plus, the in-line jack should have a clip so you can clip the mic end to your clothing where it will stay close to your mouth/neck.

    LG has included microphones in some of their other adapters (I have one for my LG Voyager). It transforms the headphones or earphones that you plug into the adapter into a "headset" so you can both listen to music and take calls. The phone has the smarts to automatically pause the music when a call is received. Then it will resume playback when the call is finished (my Voyager does this).

    If the in-line phone jack end of the adapter does NOT have a microphone, then what you have is simply a stereo headphone/earphone to stereo headset adapter that allows you to connect conventional headphones or earphones to your phone to listen to music or other media. But it won't let you take calls. You would need a different adapter for that (or a stereo headset that is designed specifically for your phone).

    I hope this helps. But remember, this is the LG Voyager forum and we are not LG Dare experts here. I've never used or handled your model phone.

    Best regards, WiredNot
     
  8. lcp

    lcp New Member

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    Re: How to Connect to the Voyager 2.5 mm Headset Jack

    Thanks WiredNot. I apologize for posting here. Truth be told I have been to every site available, including a number of Dare forums, but no one could explain the differences as you so clearly did. Everything I didn't know about plugs I learned from reading your single post.
    I took a look and there is a button, with a few holes above it so it looks like that's what it is. I was also able to go out and see if there were any adapters, headsets (over the head) that would work with these types of plugs, something I wouldn't have been able to do before.
    I am out of luck so I will have to depend on speakerphone, as there an no adapters out there for a headset, only for the headphone (music only) and there are no wired headsets made to fit 3.5mm.
    I really appreciate you sharing what you know.

    Cheers
    lcp
     
  9. WiredNot

    WiredNot New Member

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    Re: How to Connect to the Voyager 2.5 mm Headset Jack

    Hi lcp,

    Thanks for the kind words---I'm glad that I could be of some help. But I'm confused. Based on what you reported (that the adapter in your photo appears to have a built-in microphone) I would expect you to be happy. Unless I misunderstand, it should do everything you want.

    You can plug any stereo headphones or earphones with a standard 3.5 mm 3-pole phone plug into the adapter. This is the most common plug for headphones and earphones---you should have hundreds to choose from. You can choose some that are comfortable and have good sound quality.

    With the built-in microphone in the adapter, the headphones/earphones that you plug into it will be converted to a headset so you can take/make calls.

    I would think this would give you everything. Comfort (you can plug headphones/earphones of your choice into the adapter in place of the earbuds that came with it). Good sound for music. The ability to take/make calls.

    What am I missing?

    Best regards, WiredNot
     
  10. lcp

    lcp New Member

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    Re: How to Connect to the Voyager 2.5 mm Headset Jack

    I'm going to sound pretty foolish, but I understand what you are saying. I was told by the reps in the store that I would be unable to use any other headphones with the mic portion as a headset because of LG proprietory parts - I had to only use LG parts. It made no sense to me but they were pretty adamant. So when I actually called LG and was told they didn't carry any other headpones I was stumped.
    Seems like I was completely misdirected by the salespeople - they probabl didn't even understand my questions. Guess I should have been forewarned when neither rep knew how to put in the tiny microsd card...

    Thanks for helping me
    lcp
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2009
  11. bossdragon

    bossdragon Daderator

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    Re: How to Connect to the Voyager 2.5 mm Headset Jack

    This happens a lot. Those guys have very limited information or knowledge outside of the basic information needed to sell a phone.

    I'm not saying all of them are that way ( put this in so you few sales people who actually do know something won't bombard me with hate messages....;) ), but from my experience, they're lacking in a lot of area's.

    I would say if you have questions outside the basic information on a phone, our forum would be your best bet for getting the right information and by individual's who know what they are talking about.
     
  12. Neko

    Neko New Member

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    Re: How to Connect to the Voyager 2.5 mm Headset Jack

    I have the LG Voyager and I looked everywhere and I can not find a 2.5mm 4 pole.

    Can you please tell me where I can buy one? I called LG, Radio Shack, etc.... No luck!
     
  13. WiredNot

    WiredNot New Member

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    Re: How to Connect to the Voyager 2.5 mm Headset Jack

    Hi Neko,

    Really? You've looked "everywhere"? I think not! You can find headsets with Voyager-compatible 2.5 mm 4-pole plug adapters at Verizon, Amazon.com and eBay. For example, search Amazon.com for "LG SGEY0003602" to find the LG headset listed in the "Ready-Made Adapters" section of my first post.

    Best regards, WiredNot
     
  14. Neko

    Neko New Member

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    Re: How to Connect to the Voyager 2.5 mm Headset Jack

    Thanks WiredNot!

    I will try that. I already have many headsets and I was looking for the 2.5mm 4 pole adapter only, but I guess I might have to buy another headset :-(
     
  15. Thedub88

    Thedub88 New Member

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    Re: How to Connect to the Voyager 2.5 mm Headset Jack

    first let me say great info wirednot!
    second let me say wires are for OLD people!!!

    I don't get it, you guys got away from wires buy going cellular, but now are trying to hook them back up

    for the price of decent headphones and an adapter, you could just buy bluetooth headphones. You did know this phone has bluetooth - right?

    no wires to get tangled, cut, caught or anything else. Besides you don't ever have to touch your phone. push button on headphones mp3 start to play. want to change tracks, no problem - push button. not loud enough - push a button. and when you get a call, the music automaticly pauses, rings in the headphones and to answer - you got it, push the button.

    To me it seems like too much of a hastle to try to find an adapter, then headphones, just to have wires to get in the way

    bluetooth headphones are $80-$150
    i have the motorola bluetooth headphones and they sound great!! (I'm a musician and always had thousand dollar car stereo systems, so i know what music is supposed to sound like)
     
  16. WiredNot

    WiredNot New Member

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    Re: How to Connect to the Voyager 2.5 mm Headset Jack

    Hi Thedub88,

    Funny!:) I have a Plantronics Discovery 925 headset which I think you'll agree is a fairly high-end bluetooth headset. I use it for calls. So, yes, I am aware that my Voyager has bluetooth.:) My wife has a Voyager also and this is how we keep our contact lists sync'd (with a phone to phone bluetooth connection).

    But you seemed to miss my primary reason for a wired headset: Audio Quality. As far as I'm aware, no bluetooth transceiver has yet come to market that can approach the audio quality of a wired connection---especially in a phone!

    Your hearing may be "ignorant"---and that's okay because you don't know what you don't know (ignorance is "bliss")---but if you ever have a chance to hear what really good headphone/earphone sound is like, it's hard to go back to something less when it can be easily avoided.

    I'll admit that I'm probably an extreme example because I've worked in the pro audio industry for a long time. I started as a mixing and recording engineer and later became a sound system design engineer. Now I develop software for speaker design. I've been trained to hear things that others don't notice. After all, I listen to my Voyager with a pair of Sennheiser headphones with a smooth frequency response from 8 Hz to 25 kHz!!!!

    Yet it's not just about the "golden ears" few---the majority of people can hear the degradation in sound quality that occurs when a high quality pair of headphones is interfaced wirelessly via bluetooth instead of being wired directly.

    I did some research into stereo bluetooth headphones/headsets a couple of months ago and came away thinking it wasn't ready for serious audio yet. Remember, too, that the Voyager has an older version 1.2 Bluetooth transceiver. Yuck! They should have updated it to 2.0 when they introduced the Voyager Titanium model! But LG didn't.

    The most appealing thing I saw were some of the "dog tag" style bluetooth transceivers that allow you to plug in your own headphones/earphones. But you still can't get past the lower audio quality of bluetooth, itself.

    Plus there are a few other reasons to connect with wires that you may not be aware of, such as:
    • Higher sound quality (already mentioned).
    • Less drain on phone battery (you can use your phone longer).
    • Most bluetooth headphones/headsets have a short battery life, themselves (many stereo bluetooth headphones/headsets won't last a full day).
    • Greater security (less risk of someone hacking your audio feed).
    • Wired headsets/headphones are lighter than similar bluetooth counterparts (therefore, less listening fatigue).
    • Lower radio frequency (RF) emissions around your head and body.
    Sometimes "newer" is not "better". Just because you can go wireless doesn't mean that it is the best choice for every situation.

    Best regards, WiredNot
     
  17. Neko

    Neko New Member

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    Hello WiredNot...

    Can you tell me on this LG SGEY0003602 headset, where is the mic located? I'm looking on Ebay for one and saw a few. I've asked many sellers "just for their knowledge" if this headset had a 4-pole 2.5 phone plug and they didnt know what I was talking about. I see that you can take it apart and put your own good headphones in but I was wondering were the mic was, it is located in the round part where the answer/end is or is there external jack on it to plug in a mic?

    Thank you so much for your information, you have been such a great help!

    Neko

    I had also bought the Plantronics Discovery 925 for over $100, I had it for 2 days and I gave to it a good friend because all it did was echo! I wasnt sure if it was do to my stone home or what. I would rather try to get a LG SGEY0003602 Headset to get some decent sound.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2009
  18. WiredNot

    WiredNot New Member

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    Hi Neko,

    I'm glad that I was able to help but I'm beginning to wonder if the questions will ever end! Just buy one---they're cheap!


    LG SGEY0003602
    The important thing to know is that both LG and Verizon identify the LG SGEY0003602 as being the correct headphone to headset adapter combination for the Voyager (which you can confirm on their websites). As I've written before, most people you talk to will be clueless---this is especially true of eBay sellers! They won't know 4-pole from 3-pole and they will seldom understand that headphones are wired differently than headsets, etc.

    Just make sure that what you buy is really made by LG and that it's model number is really SGEY0003602 and not some knockoff that is wired wrong.

    When you receive the SGEY0003602, you'll notice that it also includes an extra USB adapter in the package. Ignore it---it is for other LG phones that don't have a 2.5 mm phone jack. The SGEY0003602 is marketed for more than just the Voyager---it also works with many other LG phones. For example, it also works with my LG VZ5500 flip phone. As for the USB adapter, most LG phones with a 2.5 mm phone jack do not support audio with the USB connector so don't try to use it with your Voyager.

    I shot the following photo to hopefully put all the questions to rest about the SGEY0003602. This is the adapter part of the unit. The headphones have been unplugged.

    The Adapter of the LG SGEY0003602

    [​IMG]

    Again, the above photo shows only the adapter portion of the SGEY0003602. The adapter has an in-line 3.5 mm 3-pole headphone jack in the top (in the "control unit") that accepts the standard 3.5 mm plug of any common pair of stereo headphones or earphones. It is wired only for stereo headphones and earphones. It will not work with a 3.5 mm headset plug (neither 3-pole or 4-pole). Nor will it work with a 3.5 mm 2-pole mono headphone or earphone plug.​


    Let's go through the features one by one:
    • 2.5 mm 4-pole phone plug - Plug this end into the jack on your Voyager phone. As far as I'm aware, it is also compatible with all LG phones that have a 2.5 mm 4-pole phone jack that is wired for headset connection.​
    • 3.5 mm 3-pole phone jack - Plug your stereo headphones or earphones in here. I recommend that you use a pair of headphones/earphones with good sensitivity. The more sensitive they are, the louder they will be. The headphone amplifier in the Voyager is not very strong and it will distort if you turn it all the way up to its maximum setting. The sound quality will be best if you turn your Voyager's volume down a couple of steps below maximum and this requires you to have a high-quality pair of sensitive headphones/earphones. I highly recommend Sennheiser---they make some of the best headphones and earphones in the world! You'll be amazed how good your Voyager sounds when you connect top-notch headphones/earphones to it.​
    • Clip - Use the clip to attach the control unit to your clothing. This is very important if you plan to use the built-in mic because the mic should be pointed toward your mouth or neck and you want it to be located close to your neck (an ideal location would be about 1-2 inches below the base of your neck or 1-2 inches below the level of your collar bones). That way it will pick up your voice well. You don't want the mic to be covered with clothing or hair. Nor do you want it to rub or slide against clothing or hair because the mic is sensitive and it will pick up the noise. Also note: The clip will rotate but be careful with it because it looks fragile to me.​
    • Mic - The microphone (mic) is located at the top of the control unit next to the 3.5 mm phone jack. Sound reaches the mic through the 4 small holes shown in the photo. You want the mic to point toward your mouth (or toward the front of your neck). LG claims that this is a "noise cancelling" mic but it will pick up the noise of anything (such as clothing) that rubs the control unit. Remember: All noise cancelling mics depend upon "proximity" to work---that means they need to be close to the sound source (your neck/mouth). In my experience, the sound quality of the mic is good. If the mic is positioned well (as described above) your voice should sound natural and clear to your callers.​
    • Volume - A volume control is provided for the headphones. It does NOT affect the mic volume. I do not recommend that you use it. It would be best if you turn this volume control to its maximum setting and leave it there. Be careful, because it is very easy to change. The best place to adjust the volume is at your Voyager phone with its exterior +/- buttons. This will produce the best sound quality and it will conserve battery power (your phone's battery will last longer if you turn down its volume with the controls on the Voyager and your phone's built-in headphone amp will have less distortion). Also remember: You can only change the call volume with the Voyager's controls while you are on a call.​
    • Call button - Use this button to answer a call when your phone rings. Use it to end a call when you are finished.​

    Other Adapters
    The LG adapter descibed above contains a built-in microphone which converts a standard pair of stereo headphones/earphones into a stereo headset. If all you want to do is listen to music/video and do not want to take calls while wearing your headphones/earphones, then you may want a simpler adapter without a mic.​

    I purchased one such adapter via eBay for $7.99 (with free U.S. shipping) from a member who goes by the ID "nakedcellphone". He ran an eBay ad titled: "New 2.5mm Stereo Headset Adapter for LG Voyager VX10000". As of today (27-Feb-09) he is still running the same eBay ad: #300266906996.​

    The adapter is made very well and works great---I use it all the time. It will enable you to use your stereo heaphones/earphones with your Voyager. The mic connection of the 2.5 mm 4-pole plug does not connect to anything. Here is a photo from Amazon.com:​

    [​IMG]
    After I placed my eBay order, the adapter that arrived was from Cingular and it was labelled simply as "Headset Adapter" and claimed compatibility with the ROKR E1 phone. The package had the following number on it: 207HA80096. Here is a photo from Amazon.com:​

    [​IMG]
    A quick search on Amazon.com turned up the same adapter for just $2.94 (plus shipping) here (note: the price changes often). That's where the above photos of it came from. So I "think" this is the same adapter---but I make no promises.​


    Plantronics Discovery 925
    My wife and I each have one of these great bluetooth headsets (photo below from Amazon.com).​

    [​IMG]
    We seldom---if ever---have any trouble with them. My wife noticed an echo problem once or twice and we never knew whether it was just a couple of bad calls or if she wasn't wearing the earset correctly. We both use them with Voyager phones. I've never had any echo problem. She uses hers all the time and hasn't had any more problems.​

    I highly recommend the Plantronics 925 for a good wireless noise-cancelling bluetooth mono headset for making/taking voice calls. We love the fact that they don't have the over-the-ear hoop unlike most earsets because the 925s are much more comfortable with eyeglasses (which we both wear).​

    Further discussion of the 925s (and other bluetooth headsets) should be started in another thread because they are off-topic here. Let's please keep this thread focused on wired connections.​

    Best regards, WiredNot
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2009
    1 person likes this.
  19. Neko

    Neko New Member

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    Thank you so much for helping me out. Your explanations are wonderful, and the photos are great! A picture is worth a thousand words! I didnt mean to ask so many questions, sorry about that, I'm just new to this cell phone stuff. I love my Voyager and I'm trying to find out more about it.

    Thanks again!

    Neko
     
  20. WiredNot

    WiredNot New Member

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    Greetings,

    This is an update: I discovered a mistake in my original post. The last illustration contained an error (which has now been fixed). The illustration that I'm referring to is the large one titled "Phone Plug Wiring" that shows how different size phone plugs are wired for different applications. The correct wiring for a stereo headphone/earphone is to always connect the left channel + signal to the tip and the right channel + signal to the ring. My original drawing had them reversed.

    By the way, this tip=left+ and ring=right+ has been very consistent over the years for stereo headphones and earphones regardless of the size of the phone connector (3.5 mm or 1/4 inch). You'll seldom, if ever, see a pair of stereo headphones/earphones wired differently.

    In order to accommodate a microphone, a stereo headset needs one additional connection for the mic + signal. This is why a 4-pole connector is used. LG chose to use the tip for the mic + signal (which makes sense since mono telephone headsets had already adopted this practice of using the tip for the mic). This forced LG to move both the left and right + signals back one position to rings 1 and 2 on the 4-pole connector. The sleeve didn't change and has always been the common for the negative "-" signal.

    Personally, I like LG's decision because it keeps the left and right + signals in the same order as you expect them to be if you are familiar with headphone/earphone wiring.

    I've corrected the illustration in my original post. If you copied this illustration previously, then you'll want to replace it with the new one.

    Best regards, WiredNot
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2009

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