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Cops want you to junk your cellphone, buy a new one with Big Brother inside

Discussion in 'alt.cellular.verizon' started by yeltrabnhoj@email.com, Feb 20, 2004.

  1. Not Me

    Not Me Guest

    "Steven J Sobol"

    | > In <R6QZb.2970$yZ1.2875@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net> on Sat, 21 Feb
    2004
    | > 21:31:29 GMT, "Ron Marraccini" <ram@teleport.com> wrote:
    | >
    | >>Look what's happening to certain people who have been speaking out
    against
    | >>government policy lately ie Iraq, etc etc.; careers ruined, baggage
    searches
    | >>at every airport, etc. etc.
    | >
    | > Which people (by name)?
    |
    |
    | I don't know about careers being ruined, but Dubya does like to corral
    | protesters into areas where they won't be heard by too many people...
    |
    | http://tinyurl.com/3cptb

    Like in Texas when he had the disabled protestor in Austin arrested for
    'endangering the safety of the gov when the gov was out of the state.
     



    › See More: Cops want you to junk your cellphone, buy a new one with Big Brother inside
  2. Not Me

    Not Me Guest

    "DexAZ"

    | > (A couple weeks ago on CSI Miami, Caine used this feature to track down
    a
    | > suspect in his murder case, but I'm not sure it really works the way
    they
    | > depicted it.)
    | >
    |
    | Yeah, I was surprised that the Police had to go to the FBI, NASA & CIA
    | regarding the case of the young girl kidnapped from the carwash to get
    video
    | footage "enhanced". Thought the CSI Miami folks would have been happy to
    | tweak that footage.
    |
    | DexAZ

    I think that has to do more with a 'chain of evidence than who does the
    actual work.
    |
    |
     
  3. David S <dwstreeter@spamisnaughty.att.net> stumbled to the microphone
    and mumbled:

    >Okay, there's one thing I want to know: if I have my phone set to "911
    >only," does it only activate the GPS if *I* dial 911, or does it also do it
    >if a PSAP calls me? In other words, can the cops find me even if I don't
    >call them?
    >
    >(A couple weeks ago on CSI Miami, Caine used this feature to track down a
    >suspect in his murder case, but I'm not sure it really works the way they
    >depicted it.)


    If it's on TV it has to be true.



    --
    I am not suffering from insanity, quite the opposite, I am enjoying
    every minute of it.
     
  4. Carl.

    Carl. Guest

    "Jesse McGrew" <jmcgrew@hanshorseprestigepelican.com.remove.animals> wrote
    in message news:4037f894$0$4873$a32e20b9@news.nntpservers.com...
    > Carl. wrote:
    > > This is a question of government mandate, not just you whining that

    nobody
    > > makes something just for you.

    >
    > Like he said: Gee, like that never happens anywhere else in life.
    >
    > If you buy a car, you get seatbelts, air bags, and a catalytic
    > converter. If you buy a radio scanner, you get a block on the cellular
    > frequencies. If you buy a large TV, you get a V-chip and closed caption
    > decoder. You get all those things even if you don't want them, thanks to
    > government mandates.
    >
    > Jesse


    I guess that makes it "OK."


    ---
    Update your PC at http://windowsupdate.microsoft.com
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.593 / Virus Database: 376 - Release Date: 2/20/2004
     
  5. John Navas

    John Navas Guest

    [POSTED TO alt.cellular.cingular - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]

    In <%lYZb.11828$jl.7523@fe2.texas.rr.com> on Sun, 22 Feb 2004 06:53:47 GMT,
    "Carl." <KronkKronk@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >"Jesse McGrew" <jmcgrew@hanshorseprestigepelican.com.remove.animals> wrote
    >in message news:4037f894$0$4873$a32e20b9@news.nntpservers.com...
    >> Carl. wrote:
    >> > This is a question of government mandate, not just you whining that nobody
    >> > makes something just for you.

    >>
    >> Like he said: Gee, like that never happens anywhere else in life.
    >>
    >> If you buy a car, you get seatbelts, air bags, and a catalytic
    >> converter. If you buy a radio scanner, you get a block on the cellular
    >> frequencies. If you buy a large TV, you get a V-chip and closed caption
    >> decoder. You get all those things even if you don't want them, thanks to
    >> government mandates.


    >I guess that makes it "OK."


    To some; not to others. It does however make it reasonable, since the public
    good outweighs the small incremental cost.

    --
    Best regards, HELP FOR CINGULAR GSM & SONY ERICSSON PHONES:
    John Navas <http://navasgrp.home.att.net/#Cingular>
     
  6. Mark Allread

    Mark Allread Guest

    On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 16:51:57 GMT, John Navas <spamfilter0@navasgroup.com>
    wrote:
    > In <%lYZb.11828$jl.7523@fe2.texas.rr.com> on Sun, 22 Feb 2004 06:53:47
    > GMT, "Carl." <KronkKronk@hotmail.com> wrote:


    >> I guess that makes it "OK."

    >
    > To some; not to others. It does however make it reasonable, since the
    > public good outweighs the small incremental cost.


    Spoken like a true fascist. Mill's second danger to liberty:

    "Like other tyrannies, the tyranny of the majority was at first, and is
    still
    vulgarly, held in dread, chiefly as operating through the acts of the
    public
    authorities. But reflecting persons perceived that when society is itself
    the
    tyrant — society collectively over the separate individuals who compose it
    —
    its means of tyrannizing are not restricted to the acts which it may do by
    the
    hands of its political functionaries. Society can and does execute its own
    mandates; and if it issues wrong mandates instead of right, or any
    mandates at
    all in things with which it ought not to meddle, it practices a social
    tyranny
    more formidable than many kinds of political oppression, since, though not
    usually upheld by such extreme penalties, it leaves fewer means of escape,
    penetrating much more deeply into the details of life, and enslaving the
    soul
    itself. Protection, therefore, against the tyranny of the magistrate is
    not
    enough; there needs protection also against the tyranny of the prevailing
    opinion and feeling, against the tendency of society to impose, by other
    means
    than civil penalties, its own ideas and practices as rules of conduct on
    those
    who dissent from them; to fetter the development and, if possible, prevent
    the
    formation of any individuality not in harmony with its ways, and compel
    all
    characters to fashion themselves upon the model of its own. There is a
    limit
    to the legitimate interference of collective opinion with individual
    independence;
    and to find that limit, and maintain it against encroachment, is as
    indispensable
    to a good condition of human affairs as protection against political
    despotism."

    — On Liberty, The Library of Liberal Arts edition, p.7.

    --
    Mark
     
  7. Joseph

    Joseph Guest

    On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 03:50:18 GMT, chawtrey@hotpop.com (Charles
    Hawtrey) wrote:

    >David S <dwstreeter@spamisnaughty.att.net> stumbled to the microphone
    >and mumbled:
    >
    >>Okay, there's one thing I want to know: if I have my phone set to "911
    >>only," does it only activate the GPS if *I* dial 911, or does it also do it
    >>if a PSAP calls me? In other words, can the cops find me even if I don't
    >>call them?
    >>
    >>(A couple weeks ago on CSI Miami, Caine used this feature to track down a
    >>suspect in his murder case, but I'm not sure it really works the way they
    >>depicted it.)

    >
    >If it's on TV it has to be true.


    A corollary to that is if it's on the internet it has to be true!

    And of course if it's on usenet it must be true!

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    remove NONO from .NONOcom to reply
     
  8. John F

    John F Guest

    The fact that you're able to make these absurd claims just shows you how far
    away this is. You have every
    right to worry about "big brother" if you feel like it and you can exercise
    your 1'st amendment rights if you want.
    But don't be upset if no one else goes along with it. Just because you
    believe it doesn't make it so. Whatever it
    is you're quoting means nothing to me.

    "Mark Allread" <mallread@flatsurface.com> wrote in message
    news:eek:pr3scg6olbsorsk@news.chartermi.com...
    > On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 16:51:57 GMT, John Navas <spamfilter0@navasgroup.com>
    > wrote:
    > > In <%lYZb.11828$jl.7523@fe2.texas.rr.com> on Sun, 22 Feb 2004 06:53:47
    > > GMT, "Carl." <KronkKronk@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >
    > >> I guess that makes it "OK."

    > >
    > > To some; not to others. It does however make it reasonable, since the
    > > public good outweighs the small incremental cost.

    >
    > Spoken like a true fascist. Mill's second danger to liberty:
    >
    > "Like other tyrannies, the tyranny of the majority was at first, and is
    > still
    > vulgarly, held in dread, chiefly as operating through the acts of the
    > public
    > authorities. But reflecting persons perceived that when society is itself
    > the
    > tyrant - society collectively over the separate individuals who compose it
    > -
    > its means of tyrannizing are not restricted to the acts which it may do by
    > the
    > hands of its political functionaries. Society can and does execute its own
    > mandates; and if it issues wrong mandates instead of right, or any
    > mandates at
    > all in things with which it ought not to meddle, it practices a social
    > tyranny
    > more formidable than many kinds of political oppression, since, though not
    > usually upheld by such extreme penalties, it leaves fewer means of escape,
    > penetrating much more deeply into the details of life, and enslaving the
    > soul
    > itself. Protection, therefore, against the tyranny of the magistrate is
    > not
    > enough; there needs protection also against the tyranny of the prevailing
    > opinion and feeling, against the tendency of society to impose, by other
    > means
    > than civil penalties, its own ideas and practices as rules of conduct on
    > those
    > who dissent from them; to fetter the development and, if possible, prevent
    > the
    > formation of any individuality not in harmony with its ways, and compel
    > all
    > characters to fashion themselves upon the model of its own. There is a
    > limit
    > to the legitimate interference of collective opinion with individual
    > independence;
    > and to find that limit, and maintain it against encroachment, is as
    > indispensable
    > to a good condition of human affairs as protection against political
    > despotism."
    >
    > - On Liberty, The Library of Liberal Arts edition, p.7.
    >
    > --
    > Mark
     
  9. John Navas

    John Navas Guest

    [POSTED TO alt.cellular.cingular - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]

    In <opr3scg6olbsorsk@news.chartermi.com> on Sun, 22 Feb 2004 14:01:44 -0500,
    Mark Allread <mallread@flatsurface.com> wrote:

    >On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 16:51:57 GMT, John Navas <spamfilter0@navasgroup.com>
    >wrote:


    >> In <%lYZb.11828$jl.7523@fe2.texas.rr.com> on Sun, 22 Feb 2004 06:53:47
    >> GMT, "Carl." <KronkKronk@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >
    >>> I guess that makes it "OK."

    >>
    >> To some; not to others. It does however make it reasonable, since the
    >> public good outweighs the small incremental cost.

    >
    >Spoken like a true fascist. ...


    Spoken like a true jerk. "Discussion" terminated.

    --
    Best regards, HELP FOR CINGULAR GSM & SONY ERICSSON PHONES:
    John Navas <http://navasgrp.home.att.net/#Cingular>
     
  10. Larry Weil

    Larry Weil Guest

    In article <vVRZb.21456$eL2.2239395@twister.southeast.rr.com>,
    "John W. Barron" <jbarron@nc.rr.com> wrote:

    > You are referring to the protest marches against the Democratic
    > Convention in New York, I presume.........A special place has been
    > prepared from them...isolated and distant from the convention center.
    > BTW, the Democrats are setting it up.
    >


    The Democratic convention will be in Boston, not New Yuck.

    --
    Larry Weil
    Lake Wobegone, NH
     
  11. Mark Allread

    Mark Allread Guest

    On Mon, 23 Feb 2004 00:51:58 GMT, John F <u85721@yahoo.com> wrote:

    > Whatever it is you're quoting means nothing to me.
    >
    > "Mark Allread" <mallread@flatsurface.com> wrote in message
    > news:eek:pr3scg6olbsorsk@news.chartermi.com...


    >> [John Stuart Mill] - On Liberty


    It's obvious that a top-poster wouldn't know the works of John Stuart Mill.

    --
    Mark
     
  12. David S

    David S Guest

    On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 14:01:44 -0500, Mark Allread <mallread@flatsurface.com>
    chose to add this to the great equation of life, the universe, and
    everything:

    >On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 16:51:57 GMT, John Navas <spamfilter0@navasgroup.com>
    >wrote:


    >> To some; not to others. It does however make it reasonable, since the
    >> public good outweighs the small incremental cost.

    >
    >Spoken like a true fascist. Mill's second danger to liberty:
    >
    >"Like other tyrannies, the tyranny of the majority was at first, and is still
    >vulgarly, held in dread, chiefly as operating through the acts of the public
    >authorities. But reflecting persons perceived that when society is itself the
    >tyrant — society collectively over the separate individuals who compose it —
    >its means of tyrannizing are not restricted to the acts which it may do by the
    >hands of its political functionaries. Society can and does execute its own
    >mandates; and if it issues wrong mandates instead of right, or any mandates at
    >all in things with which it ought not to meddle, it practices a social tyranny
    >more formidable than many kinds of political oppression, since, though not
    >usually upheld by such extreme penalties, it leaves fewer means of escape,
    >penetrating much more deeply into the details of life, and enslaving the soul
    >itself. Protection, therefore, against the tyranny of the magistrate is not
    >enough; there needs protection also against the tyranny of the prevailing
    >opinion and feeling, against the tendency of society to impose, by other means
    >than civil penalties, its own ideas and practices as rules of conduct on those
    >who dissent from them; to fetter the development and, if possible, prevent the
    >formation of any individuality not in harmony with its ways, and compel all
    >characters to fashion themselves upon the model of its own. There is a limit
    >to the legitimate interference of collective opinion with individual independence;
    >and to find that limit, and maintain it against encroachment, is as indispensable
    >to a good condition of human affairs as protection against political despotism."
    >
    >— On Liberty, The Library of Liberal Arts edition, p.7.


    Thank you for making a wonderful argument against the activities of the
    Department of Homeland Security and also against the Marriage Amendment.

    --
    David Streeter, "an internet god" -- Dave Barry
    http://home.att.net/~dwstreeter
    Remove the naughty bit from my address to reply
    Expect a train on ANY track at ANY time.
    "Oh, Cosmo Schmosmo. If you had a brain, you wouldn't be readin' Cosmo."
    - Whoopi Goldberg
     
  13. Oh, but they are so perfect for holding those Listerine pocket strips!

    "Frank S" <Frank@REMOVEALLCAPSitcreek.com> wrote in message
    news:geqdnSLI7L04QqrdRVn-gg@giganews.com...
    > > Like watch pockets in my jeans

    >
    > Yeah, I hate that!!!
    >
    > LOL!
    >
    > -Frank
    >
    >
     
  14. John F

    John F Guest

    Witty comeback.

    "Mark Allread" <mallread@flatsurface.com> wrote in message
    news:eek:pr3tojjpibsorsk@news.chartermi.com...
    > On Mon, 23 Feb 2004 00:51:58 GMT, John F <u85721@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    > > Whatever it is you're quoting means nothing to me.
    > >
    > > "Mark Allread" <mallread@flatsurface.com> wrote in message
    > > news:eek:pr3scg6olbsorsk@news.chartermi.com...

    >
    > >> [John Stuart Mill] - On Liberty

    >
    > It's obvious that a top-poster wouldn't know the works of John Stuart

    Mill.
    >
    > --
    > Mark
     
  15. On Sat, 21 Feb 2004 16:35:20 -0800, Jesse McGrew wrote:

    > Whenever any technology is shown on CSI, you can be 99% sure it doesn't
    > really work that way in real life. I don't know why they even bother
    > using computers and science jargon on there... it's not a show about
    > police officers, it's a show about wizards in uniform, using their magic
    > powers to solve crimes.
    >
    > Jesse


    Yea, and like the real CSI's have the time and resources to chase every
    unsolved crime.
     
  16. Larry Bud

    Larry Bud Guest

    > | You can turn it off, but you were still forced to buy something you didn't
    > | ask for.
    >
    > Like watch pockets in my jeans or the spare tire in my car. Likely never
    > use either but it's part of the package. As to government requirements
    > check your car, have seat belts, anti polution gear, air bags? same
    > difference.


    True, but it doesn't make it right.
     
  17. Larry Bud

    Larry Bud Guest

    Jesse McGrew <jmcgrew@hanshorseprestigepelican.com.remove.animals> wrote in message news:<40395662$0$4880$a32e20b9@news.nntpservers.com>...
    > HiTechMan wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > > Steven J Sobol wrote:
    > >
    > >> In alt.cellular John Navas <spamfilter0@navasgroup.com> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> [POSTED TO alt.cellular.cingular - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]
    > >>>
    > >>> In <R6QZb.2970$yZ1.2875@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net> on Sat, 21
    > >>> Feb 2004
    > >>> 21:31:29 GMT, "Ron Marraccini" <ram@teleport.com> wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>>> Look what's happening to certain people who have been speaking out
    > >>>> against
    > >>>> government policy lately ie Iraq, etc etc.; careers ruined, baggage
    > >>>> searches
    > >>>> at every airport, etc. etc.
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>> Which people (by name)?
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> I don't know about careers being ruined, but Dubya does like to corral
    > >> protesters into areas where they won't be heard by too many people...
    > >>
    > >> http://tinyurl.com/3cptb
    > >>

    > >
    > >
    > > In the Klinton tradition..
    > >

    > [snip]
    >
    > Who is this "Klinton"? Was he some kind of celebrity in the right-wing
    > wacko alternate universe?


    I don't know, just like I don't know who the "Bushies" or "Dubya" is.
    From what I remember, the Presidents since the 80's went: Reagan,
    Bush, Clinton, Bush.
     
  18. Larry Bud

    Larry Bud Guest

    > > Which people (by name)?
    >
    >
    > I don't know about careers being ruined, but Dubya does like to corral
    > protesters into areas where they won't be heard by too many people...
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/3cptb


    Gee, nice balance article, where only one side of the story is told.
    I also love the fact that the article quotes other newspaper stories,
    instead of actual sources. That's quite a trick.
     

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