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Dropped calls and replacement phone ?

Discussion in 'alt.cellular.verizon' started by kw, Jan 6, 2004.

  1. kw

    kw Guest

    Hello,

    Recently my phone began dropping a lot of calls. I tried reprogramming it
    via 228 but this didn't help. The phone is a VX1 purchased in August of
    2002 with the insurance plan. My contract has been up since last August and
    I've been on the plan on a month to month basis. Can I go in and just get a
    replacement phone or will they make me sign a new contract? I like my
    current plan and don't want it changed. Do I have any options here or am I
    screwed? Any help would be greatly appreciated!

    kw
     



    › See More: Dropped calls and replacement phone ?
  2. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    As the system loads up, the other CDMA users you have to compete with
    for a little slice of time to transmit your voice data becomes more
    intense. Crashing develops and the system starts dumping users it has
    trouble hearing there's no place to hand them off to.

    Of course, we blame the phones for all our little engineering screwups
    and lack of system resources. Some new phones are now limited to only
    150 milliwatts (.15W) of power to try to reduce the load caused by
    your phone hitting more than one of the 120 degree sectors
    simultaneously. Of course, this drop in power, again, reduces the
    range of the new phones because we dropped the power 25 MORE percent.

    Being able to control your phone's power from the tower end, part of
    CDMA's engineering, must put intense pressure on the engineers to
    remotely turn down the power even further when the sales department
    keeps overloading it up more and more and more. One wonders how much
    of this "programmed power control" is dropping the 200 mw phones even
    further, exaserbating the problem.

    Keep paying for calls you can't complete. The carriers are counting
    on it. Of course, you COULD trash the system by calling 611 for a
    credit every time a call drops. That would give them financial
    incentive to correct the problem....(c;



    On Tue, 06 Jan 2004 08:54:05 GMT, "kw" <k6SPAMFEST@charter.net> wrote:

    >Hello,
    >
    >Recently my phone began dropping a lot of calls. I tried reprogramming it
    >via 228 but this didn't help. The phone is a VX1 purchased in August of
    >2002 with the insurance plan. My contract has been up since last August and
    >I've been on the plan on a month to month basis. Can I go in and just get a
    >replacement phone or will they make me sign a new contract? I like my
    >current plan and don't want it changed. Do I have any options here or am I
    >screwed? Any help would be greatly appreciated!
    >
    >kw
    >
    >
    >
     
  3. In article <68a9acb2.0401060726.2f8c3fe4@posting.google.com>, plane@usa.com
    says...

    >And how would we fix this?


    expand the system instead of trying to squeeze more out of the existing system.
    --------------
    Alex
     
  4. Richard Ness

    Richard Ness Guest

    "Slice of time"???
    Sorry Larry, wrong digital protocol. You're thinking of TDMA/GSM.
    CDMA does NOT use "time slices". C = "CODE" - T = "TIME"

    Oh, FYI.... the "engineering dept" just has to add an additional carrier to alleviate most capacity issues.
    Your argument about "remotely turn down the power even further when the sales department keeps
    overloading it up more and more and more" just does not hold water. Or, at least 99% of the time....

    "try to reduce the load caused by your phone hitting more than one of the 120 degree sectors simultaneously "
    HUH????? CDMA will utilize up to 3 simultaneous connections. In fact, it LIKES to see more than 1 sector at a time.
    Again BZZZZZT!!! Wrong again Larry...

    Larry, buddy. I know you know RF. But, you have a ways to go when it comes to your CDMA 'learning curve'.


    "Larry W4CSC" <not@home.com> wrote in message news:3ffa9fd2.80631434@news.knology.net...
    > As the system loads up, the other CDMA users you have to compete with
    > for a little slice of time to transmit your voice data becomes more
    > intense. Crashing develops and the system starts dumping users it has
    > trouble hearing there's no place to hand them off to.
    >
    > Of course, we blame the phones for all our little engineering screwups
    > and lack of system resources. Some new phones are now limited to only
    > 150 milliwatts (.15W) of power to try to reduce the load caused by
    > your phone hitting more than one of the 120 degree sectors
    > simultaneously. Of course, this drop in power, again, reduces the
    > range of the new phones because we dropped the power 25 MORE percent.
    >
    > Being able to control your phone's power from the tower end, part of
    > CDMA's engineering, must put intense pressure on the engineers to
    > remotely turn down the power even further when the sales department
    > keeps overloading it up more and more and more. One wonders how much
    > of this "programmed power control" is dropping the 200 mw phones even
    > further, exaserbating the problem.
    >
    > Keep paying for calls you can't complete. The carriers are counting
    > on it. Of course, you COULD trash the system by calling 611 for a
    > credit every time a call drops. That would give them financial
    > incentive to correct the problem....(c;
    >
    >
    >
    > On Tue, 06 Jan 2004 08:54:05 GMT, "kw" <k6SPAMFEST@charter.net> wrote:
    >
    > >Hello,
    > >
    > >Recently my phone began dropping a lot of calls. I tried reprogramming it
    > >via 228 but this didn't help. The phone is a VX1 purchased in August of
    > >2002 with the insurance plan. My contract has been up since last August and
    > >I've been on the plan on a month to month basis. Can I go in and just get a
    > >replacement phone or will they make me sign a new contract? I like my
    > >current plan and don't want it changed. Do I have any options here or am I
    > >screwed? Any help would be greatly appreciated!
    > >
    > >kw
    > >
    > >
    > >

    >
     
  5. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    >
    >And how would we fix this?


    Force them all to share the public resources they are using.....our
    airwaves. Force them to erect the infrastructure to provide service.
     
  6. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    On any one receiver, no matter what tricks of modulation are used,
    only one transmitter can call this receiver at a time. When two
    transmitters simultaneously key up, the resultant crash renders
    communications useless. The radio link is, like it or not, PHYSICS
    and is ANALOG in nature. NO receiver can listen to 24 transmitters
    simultaneously talking SIMULTANEOUSLY.

    There are 60 seconds of airtime per channel per minute....any way you
    code it. Spread spectrum IS more efficient use of the available radio
    channels, as long as it finds DEAD AIR on one of them. When all
    channels are consumed by overloading the system with users, ad
    nauseum, by the marketing department, dead air time slowly, but
    certainly, goes to zero.

    CDMA doesn't wait any better than GSM for data service on an
    overloaded system. It just isn't some kind of magic you can keep
    loading up forever......



    On Tue, 6 Jan 2004 11:40:32 -0800, "Richard Ness"
    <richard.no@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote:

    >"Slice of time"???
    >Sorry Larry, wrong digital protocol. You're thinking of TDMA/GSM.
    >CDMA does NOT use "time slices". C = "CODE" - T = "TIME"
    >
    >Oh, FYI.... the "engineering dept" just has to add an additional carrier to alleviate most capacity issues.
    >Your argument about "remotely turn down the power even further when the sales department keeps
    >overloading it up more and more and more" just does not hold water. Or, at least 99% of the time....
    >
    >"try to reduce the load caused by your phone hitting more than one of the 120 degree sectors simultaneously "
    >HUH????? CDMA will utilize up to 3 simultaneous connections. In fact, it LIKES to see more than 1 sector at a time.
    >Again BZZZZZT!!! Wrong again Larry...
    >
    >Larry, buddy. I know you know RF. But, you have a ways to go when it comes to your CDMA 'learning curve'.
    >
    >
    >"Larry W4CSC" <not@home.com> wrote in message news:3ffa9fd2.80631434@news.knology.net...
    >> As the system loads up, the other CDMA users you have to compete with
    >> for a little slice of time to transmit your voice data becomes more
    >> intense. Crashing develops and the system starts dumping users it has
    >> trouble hearing there's no place to hand them off to.
    >>
    >> Of course, we blame the phones for all our little engineering screwups
    >> and lack of system resources. Some new phones are now limited to only
    >> 150 milliwatts (.15W) of power to try to reduce the load caused by
    >> your phone hitting more than one of the 120 degree sectors
    >> simultaneously. Of course, this drop in power, again, reduces the
    >> range of the new phones because we dropped the power 25 MORE percent.
    >>
    >> Being able to control your phone's power from the tower end, part of
    >> CDMA's engineering, must put intense pressure on the engineers to
    >> remotely turn down the power even further when the sales department
    >> keeps overloading it up more and more and more. One wonders how much
    >> of this "programmed power control" is dropping the 200 mw phones even
    >> further, exaserbating the problem.
    >>
    >> Keep paying for calls you can't complete. The carriers are counting
    >> on it. Of course, you COULD trash the system by calling 611 for a
    >> credit every time a call drops. That would give them financial
    >> incentive to correct the problem....(c;
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> On Tue, 06 Jan 2004 08:54:05 GMT, "kw" <k6SPAMFEST@charter.net> wrote:
    >>
    >> >Hello,
    >> >
    >> >Recently my phone began dropping a lot of calls. I tried reprogramming it
    >> >via 228 but this didn't help. The phone is a VX1 purchased in August of
    >> >2002 with the insurance plan. My contract has been up since last August and
    >> >I've been on the plan on a month to month basis. Can I go in and just get a
    >> >replacement phone or will they make me sign a new contract? I like my
    >> >current plan and don't want it changed. Do I have any options here or am I
    >> >screwed? Any help would be greatly appreciated!
    >> >
    >> >kw
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >

    >>

    >
    >
     
  7. Richard Ness

    Richard Ness Guest

    Spread spectrum - many phones using the same frequency (carrier) at the same time.
    Then, there are multiple carriers in a more 'mature' system.
    There ISN'T "channels" in the CDMA world, per say. You got 'analog' on the brain.
    Look up (and learn about) "pilot", "PN" and while you're at it, "Ec/lo"...
    But, again... bottom line... many phones, same freq. CODE division multiple access....

    "Rake receiver", is also part of your homework assignment. You will see that
    you are again wrong. Oh, and I said 3, not "24".
    CDMA phones can and do use multiple sites simultaneously. Them's just the (CDMA) facts...

    Keep trying Larry.... CDMA digital ain't the same ol' tired dog as analog. You have much to learn.
    The rules of Physics aren't suspended, just MUCH better utilized.


    "Larry W4CSC" <not@home.com> wrote in message news:3ffb7638.135526125@news.knology.net...
    > On any one receiver, no matter what tricks of modulation are used,
    > only one transmitter can call this receiver at a time. When two
    > transmitters simultaneously key up, the resultant crash renders
    > communications useless. The radio link is, like it or not, PHYSICS
    > and is ANALOG in nature. NO receiver can listen to 24 transmitters
    > simultaneously talking SIMULTANEOUSLY.
    >
    > There are 60 seconds of airtime per channel per minute....any way you
    > code it. Spread spectrum IS more efficient use of the available radio
    > channels, as long as it finds DEAD AIR on one of them. When all
    > channels are consumed by overloading the system with users, ad
    > nauseum, by the marketing department, dead air time slowly, but
    > certainly, goes to zero.
    >
    > CDMA doesn't wait any better than GSM for data service on an
    > overloaded system. It just isn't some kind of magic you can keep
    > loading up forever......
    >
    >
    >
    > On Tue, 6 Jan 2004 11:40:32 -0800, "Richard Ness"
    > <richard.no@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote:
    >
    > >"Slice of time"???
    > >Sorry Larry, wrong digital protocol. You're thinking of TDMA/GSM.
    > >CDMA does NOT use "time slices". C = "CODE" - T = "TIME"
    > >
    > >Oh, FYI.... the "engineering dept" just has to add an additional carrier to alleviate most capacity issues.
    > >Your argument about "remotely turn down the power even further when the sales department keeps
    > >overloading it up more and more and more" just does not hold water. Or, at least 99% of the time....
    > >
    > >"try to reduce the load caused by your phone hitting more than one of the 120 degree sectors simultaneously "
    > >HUH????? CDMA will utilize up to 3 simultaneous connections. In fact, it LIKES to see more than 1 sector at a time.
    > >Again BZZZZZT!!! Wrong again Larry...
    > >
    > >Larry, buddy. I know you know RF. But, you have a ways to go when it comes to your CDMA 'learning curve'.
    > >
    > >
    > >"Larry W4CSC" <not@home.com> wrote in message news:3ffa9fd2.80631434@news.knology.net...
    > >> As the system loads up, the other CDMA users you have to compete with
    > >> for a little slice of time to transmit your voice data becomes more
    > >> intense. Crashing develops and the system starts dumping users it has
    > >> trouble hearing there's no place to hand them off to.
    > >>
    > >> Of course, we blame the phones for all our little engineering screwups
    > >> and lack of system resources. Some new phones are now limited to only
    > >> 150 milliwatts (.15W) of power to try to reduce the load caused by
    > >> your phone hitting more than one of the 120 degree sectors
    > >> simultaneously. Of course, this drop in power, again, reduces the
    > >> range of the new phones because we dropped the power 25 MORE percent.
    > >>
    > >> Being able to control your phone's power from the tower end, part of
    > >> CDMA's engineering, must put intense pressure on the engineers to
    > >> remotely turn down the power even further when the sales department
    > >> keeps overloading it up more and more and more. One wonders how much
    > >> of this "programmed power control" is dropping the 200 mw phones even
    > >> further, exaserbating the problem.
    > >>
    > >> Keep paying for calls you can't complete. The carriers are counting
    > >> on it. Of course, you COULD trash the system by calling 611 for a
    > >> credit every time a call drops. That would give them financial
    > >> incentive to correct the problem....(c;
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> On Tue, 06 Jan 2004 08:54:05 GMT, "kw" <k6SPAMFEST@charter.net> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> >Hello,
    > >> >
    > >> >Recently my phone began dropping a lot of calls. I tried reprogramming it
    > >> >via 228 but this didn't help. The phone is a VX1 purchased in August of
    > >> >2002 with the insurance plan. My contract has been up since last August and
    > >> >I've been on the plan on a month to month basis. Can I go in and just get a
    > >> >replacement phone or will they make me sign a new contract? I like my
    > >> >current plan and don't want it changed. Do I have any options here or am I
    > >> >screwed? Any help would be greatly appreciated!
    > >> >
    > >> >kw
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >>

    > >
    > >

    >
     
  8. kw

    kw Guest

    This conversation is over my head, but from what I've been able to piece
    together am I correct in assuming that I can't eliminate my recent increase
    in dropped calls? Because the Network here in L.A. is too crowded,
    exchanging the phone won't help?


    "Richard Ness" <richard.no@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote in message
    news:MeOdnQSKUOP3EmaiRVn-sA@comcast.com...
    > Spread spectrum - many phones using the same frequency (carrier) at the

    same time.
    > Then, there are multiple carriers in a more 'mature' system.
    > There ISN'T "channels" in the CDMA world, per say. You got 'analog' on the

    brain.
    > Look up (and learn about) "pilot", "PN" and while you're at it,

    "Ec/lo"...
    > But, again... bottom line... many phones, same freq. CODE division

    multiple access....
    >
    > "Rake receiver", is also part of your homework assignment. You will see

    that
    > you are again wrong. Oh, and I said 3, not "24".
    > CDMA phones can and do use multiple sites simultaneously. Them's just the

    (CDMA) facts...
    >
    > Keep trying Larry.... CDMA digital ain't the same ol' tired dog as

    analog. You have much to learn.
    > The rules of Physics aren't suspended, just MUCH better utilized.
    >
    >
    > "Larry W4CSC" <not@home.com> wrote in message

    news:3ffb7638.135526125@news.knology.net...
    > > On any one receiver, no matter what tricks of modulation are used,
    > > only one transmitter can call this receiver at a time. When two
    > > transmitters simultaneously key up, the resultant crash renders
    > > communications useless. The radio link is, like it or not, PHYSICS
    > > and is ANALOG in nature. NO receiver can listen to 24 transmitters
    > > simultaneously talking SIMULTANEOUSLY.
    > >
    > > There are 60 seconds of airtime per channel per minute....any way you
    > > code it. Spread spectrum IS more efficient use of the available radio
    > > channels, as long as it finds DEAD AIR on one of them. When all
    > > channels are consumed by overloading the system with users, ad
    > > nauseum, by the marketing department, dead air time slowly, but
    > > certainly, goes to zero.
    > >
    > > CDMA doesn't wait any better than GSM for data service on an
    > > overloaded system. It just isn't some kind of magic you can keep
    > > loading up forever......
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > On Tue, 6 Jan 2004 11:40:32 -0800, "Richard Ness"
    > > <richard.no@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote:
    > >
    > > >"Slice of time"???
    > > >Sorry Larry, wrong digital protocol. You're thinking of TDMA/GSM.
    > > >CDMA does NOT use "time slices". C = "CODE" - T = "TIME"
    > > >
    > > >Oh, FYI.... the "engineering dept" just has to add an additional

    carrier to alleviate most capacity issues.
    > > >Your argument about "remotely turn down the power even further when the

    sales department keeps
    > > >overloading it up more and more and more" just does not hold water.

    Or, at least 99% of the time....
    > > >
    > > >"try to reduce the load caused by your phone hitting more than one of

    the 120 degree sectors simultaneously "
    > > >HUH????? CDMA will utilize up to 3 simultaneous connections. In fact,

    it LIKES to see more than 1 sector at a time.
    > > >Again BZZZZZT!!! Wrong again Larry...
    > > >
    > > >Larry, buddy. I know you know RF. But, you have a ways to go when it

    comes to your CDMA 'learning curve'.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >"Larry W4CSC" <not@home.com> wrote in message

    news:3ffa9fd2.80631434@news.knology.net...
    > > >> As the system loads up, the other CDMA users you have to compete with
    > > >> for a little slice of time to transmit your voice data becomes more
    > > >> intense. Crashing develops and the system starts dumping users it

    has
    > > >> trouble hearing there's no place to hand them off to.
    > > >>
    > > >> Of course, we blame the phones for all our little engineering

    screwups
    > > >> and lack of system resources. Some new phones are now limited to

    only
    > > >> 150 milliwatts (.15W) of power to try to reduce the load caused by
    > > >> your phone hitting more than one of the 120 degree sectors
    > > >> simultaneously. Of course, this drop in power, again, reduces the
    > > >> range of the new phones because we dropped the power 25 MORE

    percent.
    > > >>
    > > >> Being able to control your phone's power from the tower end, part of
    > > >> CDMA's engineering, must put intense pressure on the engineers to
    > > >> remotely turn down the power even further when the sales department
    > > >> keeps overloading it up more and more and more. One wonders how much
    > > >> of this "programmed power control" is dropping the 200 mw phones even
    > > >> further, exaserbating the problem.
    > > >>
    > > >> Keep paying for calls you can't complete. The carriers are counting
    > > >> on it. Of course, you COULD trash the system by calling 611 for a
    > > >> credit every time a call drops. That would give them financial
    > > >> incentive to correct the problem....(c;
    > > >>
    > > >>
    > > >>
    > > >> On Tue, 06 Jan 2004 08:54:05 GMT, "kw" <k6SPAMFEST@charter.net>

    wrote:
    > > >>
    > > >> >Hello,
    > > >> >
    > > >> >Recently my phone began dropping a lot of calls. I tried

    reprogramming it
    > > >> >via 228 but this didn't help. The phone is a VX1 purchased in

    August of
    > > >> >2002 with the insurance plan. My contract has been up since last

    August and
    > > >> >I've been on the plan on a month to month basis. Can I go in and

    just get a
    > > >> >replacement phone or will they make me sign a new contract? I like

    my
    > > >> >current plan and don't want it changed. Do I have any options here

    or am I
    > > >> >screwed? Any help would be greatly appreciated!
    > > >> >
    > > >> >kw
    > > >> >
    > > >> >
    > > >> >
    > > >>
    > > >
    > > >

    > >

    >
    >
     
  9. Just call Verizon and explain the problem. They will ask the location of
    the drops and can look them up as well. I wouldn't be surprised if they
    authorize a new phone thru your insurance plan.

    PoD
     

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