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help with VX4400 and linux

Discussion in 'alt.cellular.verizon' started by Scott, Nov 28, 2003.

  1. Scott

    Scott Guest

    I just purchased a VX4400 phone from verizon the other day and now I
    would like to try and use it to connect to the internet from my Linux
    box. Verizon sold me the "Mobil Office Kit" for the phone which
    included a USB to phone cable. There is a box in the middle of the
    cable and I have no idea what that is for...

    I would like to try and use my cell phone as a modem for my linux
    laptop. Has anybody been successful in doing this? Is there any
    documentation out there that can help with this?

    I would also like to upload images sounds and other java stuff to the
    phone? Is that possible as well?

    Thanks,
    Scott
     



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  2. Mike

    Mike Guest

    On 28 Nov 2003 16:51:04 -0800, googlegroups@scottsavarese.com (Scott)
    wrote:

    >I just purchased a VX4400 phone from verizon the other day and now I
    >would like to try and use it to connect to the internet from my Linux
    >box. Verizon sold me the "Mobil Office Kit" for the phone which
    >included a USB to phone cable. There is a box in the middle of the
    >cable and I have no idea what that is for...


    You may or may not be able to get the Linux box to talk to the USB
    cable.

    From the 4400 FAQ (http://www.rogerbinns.com/vx4400/vx4400faq.html):

    -----------

    There are only Windows drivers for the straight USB cable, so if you
    only ever intend to use Windows, then that cable is fine. If you ever
    intend to use Linux or MacOS then you should get the serial based
    cable. The easiest way to ensure you have the latter is to ask for the
    cable for the VX-10.

    Drivers for the Radio Shack/FutureDial cable
    Linux and MacOS have builtin drivers for the serial based cable.

    ---------------

    I'm not up on the Linux community, so this information could be dated
    by now.

    Mike
     
  3. Hugh Wolf

    Hugh Wolf Guest

    On 2003-11-29, Scott <googlegroups@scottsavarese.com> wrote:

    > There is a box in the middle of the
    > cable and I have no idea what that is for...


    It's a serial-usb converter using the Prolific 2303 (?) chip. You
    can also buy a straight usb cable for the 4400 but you're more likely
    to have success with the converting cable.

    Linux 2.4 (and later) kernels apparently come with a driver for this
    device. But only you know whether or not the kernel you're running
    was built with that option enabled. So your first step is to
    determine whether or not your kernel includes the driver, and rebuild
    with the right option enabled if it doesn't.

    Once the driver is installed, the device should be recognized. The
    next step is to determine what /dev node it uses. Most likely it
    will either be /dev/ttyUSB0 or /dev/usb/tts/0, depending whether or
    not you're using the new devfs.

    Set your phone to use rs232 (not usb). The speed setting on the phone
    depends on whether or you're using VZW's high-speed network (used to
    be "Express Network", now called something else).


    > I would like to try and use my cell phone as a modem for my linux
    > laptop. Has anybody been successful in doing this?


    Once you know the /dev node you should be able to treat it like any
    other modem, using a fairly generic connect script.

    The main non-generic thing you need here is the right initialization
    string, which again depends on whether or you're using VZW's
    high-speed network. The main items of interest are the values of
    $QCDMR and $QCQNC. You'll want something like


    AT$QCMDR=2$QCQNC=1 (low-speed)
    AT$QCMDR=3$QCQNC=0 (high-speed)


    > I would also like to upload images sounds


    A handy Python application called bitpim lets you do this (again, as
    long as you know the /dev node for the device). See

    http://bitpim.sourceforge.net/



    > and other java stuff to the phone?


    What sort of java stuff? I don't think the 4400 comes with a jvm...
     
  4. Scott

    Scott Guest

    Hugh Wolf <hwolf@deutsches.lieder.de> wrote in message news:<WM2yb.353006$Fm2.353324@attbi_s04>...

    > It's a serial-usb converter using the Prolific 2303 (?) chip. You
    > can also buy a straight usb cable for the 4400 but you're more likely
    > to have success with the converting cable.
    >
    > Linux 2.4 (and later) kernels apparently come with a driver for this
    > device. But only you know whether or not the kernel you're running
    > was built with that option enabled. So your first step is to
    > determine whether or not your kernel includes the driver, and rebuild
    > with the right option enabled if it doesn't.


    OK... so I have the USB-serial converter cable. I was able to get the
    usbserial and pl2303 module installed. I have bitpim working on
    /dev/ttypUSB0. Unfortunately, I haven't gotten it to work as a modem
    yet.


    >
    >
    > > I would like to try and use my cell phone as a modem for my linux
    > > laptop. Has anybody been successful in doing this?

    >
    > Once you know the /dev node you should be able to treat it like any
    > other modem, using a fairly generic connect script.



    Could you go into more details about this? I go into minicom, then set
    my port to /dev/ttyUSB0. I then type "AT" and I should get an "OK"
    back from the modem... I don't get that back.

    Could you do an lsmod on your system to let me know if there are other
    modules I'll need. Is the acm module needed?

    Thanks,
    Scott
     
  5. Hugh Wolf

    Hugh Wolf Guest

    On 2003-12-02, Scott <googlegroups@scottsavarese.com> wrote:
    >> Once you know the /dev node you should be able to treat it like any
    >> other modem, using a fairly generic connect script.

    >
    >
    > Could you go into more details about this?


    I should probably say up front that I don't use linux anymore
    (converted to osx some time back). But in general what I meant here
    was, whatever you do to dial up with your wired phone line, you should
    be able to do with the cell phone, simply by substituting the right
    /dev node and making minor adjustements to the node options and the
    modem initialization string.

    When I _was_ running linux and using ppp, I handled it by invoking
    pppd directly. Something like this:

    > pppd call mypeer


    where mypeer is the name of a pppd options file in /etc/ppp/peers/.
    That file looked something like this in my case:

    /dev/ttyS0 115200 crtscts
    connect '/usr/sbin/chat -v -f /etc/ppp/chat-mypeer'
    noauth

    Here's where you would change the dev node, and of course the options
    associated with it. But everything else should stay the same, at
    least in theory.

    The chat script in turn looks something like this:

    ABORT BUSY ABORT 'NO CARRIER' '' '\n\n' '' AT&F OK ATDTphone# CONNECT
    \n
    Login: myname
    Password: mypass

    Here's where you would add any further modem init options, specify
    the phone number etc.

    The exact details of the expected strings are specific your dialup,
    which won't necessarily say "Login:" etc.




    > I go into minicom, then set
    > my port to /dev/ttyUSB0. I then type "AT" and I should get an "OK"
    > back from the modem... I don't get that back.


    Could be a speed mismatch between the /dev node and the phone.
     

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