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More of Larry's BS...

Discussion in 'alt.cellular.verizon' started by Richard Ness, Jul 3, 2004.

  1. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <HamdnRNshI_gR3HdRVn-jg@comcast.com>,
    Richard Ness <richardno@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote:
    >AMPS does have the ability to control the power levels on a phone
    >Some carriers didn't use it however, but it is part of the protocol.
    >
    >"David S" <dwstreeter@spamisnaughty.att.net> wrote in message
    >news:2b1oe05cqjl9fuprlau9qmqtml46a4fm64@4ax.com...
    >> It was my impression that even though CDMA and AMPS use the same frequency
    >> bands, they cannot be on the same exact frequencies at the same time, and,
    >> since they are different types of transmissions, need separate transceivers
    >> and antennae.
    >>
    >> And correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that on AMPS, the phone always
    >> transmits at full power.


    A given cellular antenna covers the whole cellular band (A-side or B-side,
    anyway), and can be designed to additionally handle the PCS band (or you
    can have PCS-only antennas). There are generally separate transmit and
    receive antennas. CDMA and AMPS will be deployed on distinct channels
    on a given cellular band, so they use the same antenna. The fact that
    on some channels the modulation is analog FM, and on others is digital
    spread-spectrum, is irrelevant.

    Concerning power, I think most cellular companies used the AMPS power
    control protocol. But the transmitter is on for the entire duration of
    the call, whether you are talking or not.
     



    › See More: More of Larry's BS...
  2. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <HamdnRNshI_gR3HdRVn-jg@comcast.com>,
    Richard Ness <richardno@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote:
    >AMPS does have the ability to control the power levels on a phone
    >Some carriers didn't use it however, but it is part of the protocol.
    >
    >"David S" <dwstreeter@spamisnaughty.att.net> wrote in message
    >news:2b1oe05cqjl9fuprlau9qmqtml46a4fm64@4ax.com...
    >> It was my impression that even though CDMA and AMPS use the same frequency
    >> bands, they cannot be on the same exact frequencies at the same time, and,
    >> since they are different types of transmissions, need separate transceivers
    >> and antennae.
    >>
    >> And correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that on AMPS, the phone always
    >> transmits at full power.


    A given cellular antenna covers the whole cellular band (A-side or B-side,
    anyway), and can be designed to additionally handle the PCS band (or you
    can have PCS-only antennas). There are generally separate transmit and
    receive antennas. CDMA and AMPS will be deployed on distinct channels
    on a given cellular band, so they use the same antenna. The fact that
    on some channels the modulation is analog FM, and on others is digital
    spread-spectrum, is irrelevant.

    Concerning power, I think most cellular companies used the AMPS power
    control protocol. But the transmitter is on for the entire duration of
    the call, whether you are talking or not.
     
  3. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <HamdnRNshI_gR3HdRVn-jg@comcast.com>,
    Richard Ness <richardno@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote:
    >AMPS does have the ability to control the power levels on a phone
    >Some carriers didn't use it however, but it is part of the protocol.
    >
    >"David S" <dwstreeter@spamisnaughty.att.net> wrote in message
    >news:2b1oe05cqjl9fuprlau9qmqtml46a4fm64@4ax.com...
    >> It was my impression that even though CDMA and AMPS use the same frequency
    >> bands, they cannot be on the same exact frequencies at the same time, and,
    >> since they are different types of transmissions, need separate transceivers
    >> and antennae.
    >>
    >> And correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that on AMPS, the phone always
    >> transmits at full power.


    A given cellular antenna covers the whole cellular band (A-side or B-side,
    anyway), and can be designed to additionally handle the PCS band (or you
    can have PCS-only antennas). There are generally separate transmit and
    receive antennas. CDMA and AMPS will be deployed on distinct channels
    on a given cellular band, so they use the same antenna. The fact that
    on some channels the modulation is analog FM, and on others is digital
    spread-spectrum, is irrelevant.

    Concerning power, I think most cellular companies used the AMPS power
    control protocol. But the transmitter is on for the entire duration of
    the call, whether you are talking or not.
     
  4. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <HamdnRNshI_gR3HdRVn-jg@comcast.com>,
    Richard Ness <richardno@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote:
    >AMPS does have the ability to control the power levels on a phone
    >Some carriers didn't use it however, but it is part of the protocol.
    >
    >"David S" <dwstreeter@spamisnaughty.att.net> wrote in message
    >news:2b1oe05cqjl9fuprlau9qmqtml46a4fm64@4ax.com...
    >> It was my impression that even though CDMA and AMPS use the same frequency
    >> bands, they cannot be on the same exact frequencies at the same time, and,
    >> since they are different types of transmissions, need separate transceivers
    >> and antennae.
    >>
    >> And correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that on AMPS, the phone always
    >> transmits at full power.


    A given cellular antenna covers the whole cellular band (A-side or B-side,
    anyway), and can be designed to additionally handle the PCS band (or you
    can have PCS-only antennas). There are generally separate transmit and
    receive antennas. CDMA and AMPS will be deployed on distinct channels
    on a given cellular band, so they use the same antenna. The fact that
    on some channels the modulation is analog FM, and on others is digital
    spread-spectrum, is irrelevant.

    Concerning power, I think most cellular companies used the AMPS power
    control protocol. But the transmitter is on for the entire duration of
    the call, whether you are talking or not.
     
  5. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <HamdnRNshI_gR3HdRVn-jg@comcast.com>,
    Richard Ness <richardno@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote:
    >AMPS does have the ability to control the power levels on a phone
    >Some carriers didn't use it however, but it is part of the protocol.
    >
    >"David S" <dwstreeter@spamisnaughty.att.net> wrote in message
    >news:2b1oe05cqjl9fuprlau9qmqtml46a4fm64@4ax.com...
    >> It was my impression that even though CDMA and AMPS use the same frequency
    >> bands, they cannot be on the same exact frequencies at the same time, and,
    >> since they are different types of transmissions, need separate transceivers
    >> and antennae.
    >>
    >> And correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that on AMPS, the phone always
    >> transmits at full power.


    A given cellular antenna covers the whole cellular band (A-side or B-side,
    anyway), and can be designed to additionally handle the PCS band (or you
    can have PCS-only antennas). There are generally separate transmit and
    receive antennas. CDMA and AMPS will be deployed on distinct channels
    on a given cellular band, so they use the same antenna. The fact that
    on some channels the modulation is analog FM, and on others is digital
    spread-spectrum, is irrelevant.

    Concerning power, I think most cellular companies used the AMPS power
    control protocol. But the transmitter is on for the entire duration of
    the call, whether you are talking or not.
     
  6. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <HamdnRNshI_gR3HdRVn-jg@comcast.com>,
    Richard Ness <richardno@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote:
    >AMPS does have the ability to control the power levels on a phone
    >Some carriers didn't use it however, but it is part of the protocol.
    >
    >"David S" <dwstreeter@spamisnaughty.att.net> wrote in message
    >news:2b1oe05cqjl9fuprlau9qmqtml46a4fm64@4ax.com...
    >> It was my impression that even though CDMA and AMPS use the same frequency
    >> bands, they cannot be on the same exact frequencies at the same time, and,
    >> since they are different types of transmissions, need separate transceivers
    >> and antennae.
    >>
    >> And correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that on AMPS, the phone always
    >> transmits at full power.


    A given cellular antenna covers the whole cellular band (A-side or B-side,
    anyway), and can be designed to additionally handle the PCS band (or you
    can have PCS-only antennas). There are generally separate transmit and
    receive antennas. CDMA and AMPS will be deployed on distinct channels
    on a given cellular band, so they use the same antenna. The fact that
    on some channels the modulation is analog FM, and on others is digital
    spread-spectrum, is irrelevant.

    Concerning power, I think most cellular companies used the AMPS power
    control protocol. But the transmitter is on for the entire duration of
    the call, whether you are talking or not.
     
  7. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <HamdnRNshI_gR3HdRVn-jg@comcast.com>,
    Richard Ness <richardno@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote:
    >AMPS does have the ability to control the power levels on a phone
    >Some carriers didn't use it however, but it is part of the protocol.
    >
    >"David S" <dwstreeter@spamisnaughty.att.net> wrote in message
    >news:2b1oe05cqjl9fuprlau9qmqtml46a4fm64@4ax.com...
    >> It was my impression that even though CDMA and AMPS use the same frequency
    >> bands, they cannot be on the same exact frequencies at the same time, and,
    >> since they are different types of transmissions, need separate transceivers
    >> and antennae.
    >>
    >> And correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that on AMPS, the phone always
    >> transmits at full power.


    A given cellular antenna covers the whole cellular band (A-side or B-side,
    anyway), and can be designed to additionally handle the PCS band (or you
    can have PCS-only antennas). There are generally separate transmit and
    receive antennas. CDMA and AMPS will be deployed on distinct channels
    on a given cellular band, so they use the same antenna. The fact that
    on some channels the modulation is analog FM, and on others is digital
    spread-spectrum, is irrelevant.

    Concerning power, I think most cellular companies used the AMPS power
    control protocol. But the transmitter is on for the entire duration of
    the call, whether you are talking or not.
     
  8. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <HamdnRNshI_gR3HdRVn-jg@comcast.com>,
    Richard Ness <richardno@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote:
    >AMPS does have the ability to control the power levels on a phone
    >Some carriers didn't use it however, but it is part of the protocol.
    >
    >"David S" <dwstreeter@spamisnaughty.att.net> wrote in message
    >news:2b1oe05cqjl9fuprlau9qmqtml46a4fm64@4ax.com...
    >> It was my impression that even though CDMA and AMPS use the same frequency
    >> bands, they cannot be on the same exact frequencies at the same time, and,
    >> since they are different types of transmissions, need separate transceivers
    >> and antennae.
    >>
    >> And correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that on AMPS, the phone always
    >> transmits at full power.


    A given cellular antenna covers the whole cellular band (A-side or B-side,
    anyway), and can be designed to additionally handle the PCS band (or you
    can have PCS-only antennas). There are generally separate transmit and
    receive antennas. CDMA and AMPS will be deployed on distinct channels
    on a given cellular band, so they use the same antenna. The fact that
    on some channels the modulation is analog FM, and on others is digital
    spread-spectrum, is irrelevant.

    Concerning power, I think most cellular companies used the AMPS power
    control protocol. But the transmitter is on for the entire duration of
    the call, whether you are talking or not.
     
  9. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <HamdnRNshI_gR3HdRVn-jg@comcast.com>,
    Richard Ness <richardno@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote:
    >AMPS does have the ability to control the power levels on a phone
    >Some carriers didn't use it however, but it is part of the protocol.
    >
    >"David S" <dwstreeter@spamisnaughty.att.net> wrote in message
    >news:2b1oe05cqjl9fuprlau9qmqtml46a4fm64@4ax.com...
    >> It was my impression that even though CDMA and AMPS use the same frequency
    >> bands, they cannot be on the same exact frequencies at the same time, and,
    >> since they are different types of transmissions, need separate transceivers
    >> and antennae.
    >>
    >> And correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that on AMPS, the phone always
    >> transmits at full power.


    A given cellular antenna covers the whole cellular band (A-side or B-side,
    anyway), and can be designed to additionally handle the PCS band (or you
    can have PCS-only antennas). There are generally separate transmit and
    receive antennas. CDMA and AMPS will be deployed on distinct channels
    on a given cellular band, so they use the same antenna. The fact that
    on some channels the modulation is analog FM, and on others is digital
    spread-spectrum, is irrelevant.

    Concerning power, I think most cellular companies used the AMPS power
    control protocol. But the transmitter is on for the entire duration of
    the call, whether you are talking or not.
     
  10. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <HamdnRNshI_gR3HdRVn-jg@comcast.com>,
    Richard Ness <richardno@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote:
    >AMPS does have the ability to control the power levels on a phone
    >Some carriers didn't use it however, but it is part of the protocol.
    >
    >"David S" <dwstreeter@spamisnaughty.att.net> wrote in message
    >news:2b1oe05cqjl9fuprlau9qmqtml46a4fm64@4ax.com...
    >> It was my impression that even though CDMA and AMPS use the same frequency
    >> bands, they cannot be on the same exact frequencies at the same time, and,
    >> since they are different types of transmissions, need separate transceivers
    >> and antennae.
    >>
    >> And correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that on AMPS, the phone always
    >> transmits at full power.


    A given cellular antenna covers the whole cellular band (A-side or B-side,
    anyway), and can be designed to additionally handle the PCS band (or you
    can have PCS-only antennas). There are generally separate transmit and
    receive antennas. CDMA and AMPS will be deployed on distinct channels
    on a given cellular band, so they use the same antenna. The fact that
    on some channels the modulation is analog FM, and on others is digital
    spread-spectrum, is irrelevant.

    Concerning power, I think most cellular companies used the AMPS power
    control protocol. But the transmitter is on for the entire duration of
    the call, whether you are talking or not.
     
  11. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <HamdnRNshI_gR3HdRVn-jg@comcast.com>,
    Richard Ness <richardno@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote:
    >AMPS does have the ability to control the power levels on a phone
    >Some carriers didn't use it however, but it is part of the protocol.
    >
    >"David S" <dwstreeter@spamisnaughty.att.net> wrote in message
    >news:2b1oe05cqjl9fuprlau9qmqtml46a4fm64@4ax.com...
    >> It was my impression that even though CDMA and AMPS use the same frequency
    >> bands, they cannot be on the same exact frequencies at the same time, and,
    >> since they are different types of transmissions, need separate transceivers
    >> and antennae.
    >>
    >> And correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that on AMPS, the phone always
    >> transmits at full power.


    A given cellular antenna covers the whole cellular band (A-side or B-side,
    anyway), and can be designed to additionally handle the PCS band (or you
    can have PCS-only antennas). There are generally separate transmit and
    receive antennas. CDMA and AMPS will be deployed on distinct channels
    on a given cellular band, so they use the same antenna. The fact that
    on some channels the modulation is analog FM, and on others is digital
    spread-spectrum, is irrelevant.

    Concerning power, I think most cellular companies used the AMPS power
    control protocol. But the transmitter is on for the entire duration of
    the call, whether you are talking or not.
     
  12. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <HamdnRNshI_gR3HdRVn-jg@comcast.com>,
    Richard Ness <richardno@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote:
    >AMPS does have the ability to control the power levels on a phone
    >Some carriers didn't use it however, but it is part of the protocol.
    >
    >"David S" <dwstreeter@spamisnaughty.att.net> wrote in message
    >news:2b1oe05cqjl9fuprlau9qmqtml46a4fm64@4ax.com...
    >> It was my impression that even though CDMA and AMPS use the same frequency
    >> bands, they cannot be on the same exact frequencies at the same time, and,
    >> since they are different types of transmissions, need separate transceivers
    >> and antennae.
    >>
    >> And correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that on AMPS, the phone always
    >> transmits at full power.


    A given cellular antenna covers the whole cellular band (A-side or B-side,
    anyway), and can be designed to additionally handle the PCS band (or you
    can have PCS-only antennas). There are generally separate transmit and
    receive antennas. CDMA and AMPS will be deployed on distinct channels
    on a given cellular band, so they use the same antenna. The fact that
    on some channels the modulation is analog FM, and on others is digital
    spread-spectrum, is irrelevant.

    Concerning power, I think most cellular companies used the AMPS power
    control protocol. But the transmitter is on for the entire duration of
    the call, whether you are talking or not.
     
  13. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <HamdnRNshI_gR3HdRVn-jg@comcast.com>,
    Richard Ness <richardno@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote:
    >AMPS does have the ability to control the power levels on a phone
    >Some carriers didn't use it however, but it is part of the protocol.
    >
    >"David S" <dwstreeter@spamisnaughty.att.net> wrote in message
    >news:2b1oe05cqjl9fuprlau9qmqtml46a4fm64@4ax.com...
    >> It was my impression that even though CDMA and AMPS use the same frequency
    >> bands, they cannot be on the same exact frequencies at the same time, and,
    >> since they are different types of transmissions, need separate transceivers
    >> and antennae.
    >>
    >> And correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that on AMPS, the phone always
    >> transmits at full power.


    A given cellular antenna covers the whole cellular band (A-side or B-side,
    anyway), and can be designed to additionally handle the PCS band (or you
    can have PCS-only antennas). There are generally separate transmit and
    receive antennas. CDMA and AMPS will be deployed on distinct channels
    on a given cellular band, so they use the same antenna. The fact that
    on some channels the modulation is analog FM, and on others is digital
    spread-spectrum, is irrelevant.

    Concerning power, I think most cellular companies used the AMPS power
    control protocol. But the transmitter is on for the entire duration of
    the call, whether you are talking or not.
     
  14. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <HamdnRNshI_gR3HdRVn-jg@comcast.com>,
    Richard Ness <richardno@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote:
    >AMPS does have the ability to control the power levels on a phone
    >Some carriers didn't use it however, but it is part of the protocol.
    >
    >"David S" <dwstreeter@spamisnaughty.att.net> wrote in message
    >news:2b1oe05cqjl9fuprlau9qmqtml46a4fm64@4ax.com...
    >> It was my impression that even though CDMA and AMPS use the same frequency
    >> bands, they cannot be on the same exact frequencies at the same time, and,
    >> since they are different types of transmissions, need separate transceivers
    >> and antennae.
    >>
    >> And correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that on AMPS, the phone always
    >> transmits at full power.


    A given cellular antenna covers the whole cellular band (A-side or B-side,
    anyway), and can be designed to additionally handle the PCS band (or you
    can have PCS-only antennas). There are generally separate transmit and
    receive antennas. CDMA and AMPS will be deployed on distinct channels
    on a given cellular band, so they use the same antenna. The fact that
    on some channels the modulation is analog FM, and on others is digital
    spread-spectrum, is irrelevant.

    Concerning power, I think most cellular companies used the AMPS power
    control protocol. But the transmitter is on for the entire duration of
    the call, whether you are talking or not.
     
  15. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <HamdnRNshI_gR3HdRVn-jg@comcast.com>,
    Richard Ness <richardno@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote:
    >AMPS does have the ability to control the power levels on a phone
    >Some carriers didn't use it however, but it is part of the protocol.
    >
    >"David S" <dwstreeter@spamisnaughty.att.net> wrote in message
    >news:2b1oe05cqjl9fuprlau9qmqtml46a4fm64@4ax.com...
    >> It was my impression that even though CDMA and AMPS use the same frequency
    >> bands, they cannot be on the same exact frequencies at the same time, and,
    >> since they are different types of transmissions, need separate transceivers
    >> and antennae.
    >>
    >> And correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that on AMPS, the phone always
    >> transmits at full power.


    A given cellular antenna covers the whole cellular band (A-side or B-side,
    anyway), and can be designed to additionally handle the PCS band (or you
    can have PCS-only antennas). There are generally separate transmit and
    receive antennas. CDMA and AMPS will be deployed on distinct channels
    on a given cellular band, so they use the same antenna. The fact that
    on some channels the modulation is analog FM, and on others is digital
    spread-spectrum, is irrelevant.

    Concerning power, I think most cellular companies used the AMPS power
    control protocol. But the transmitter is on for the entire duration of
    the call, whether you are talking or not.
     
  16. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <HamdnRNshI_gR3HdRVn-jg@comcast.com>,
    Richard Ness <richardno@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote:
    >AMPS does have the ability to control the power levels on a phone
    >Some carriers didn't use it however, but it is part of the protocol.
    >
    >"David S" <dwstreeter@spamisnaughty.att.net> wrote in message
    >news:2b1oe05cqjl9fuprlau9qmqtml46a4fm64@4ax.com...
    >> It was my impression that even though CDMA and AMPS use the same frequency
    >> bands, they cannot be on the same exact frequencies at the same time, and,
    >> since they are different types of transmissions, need separate transceivers
    >> and antennae.
    >>
    >> And correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that on AMPS, the phone always
    >> transmits at full power.


    A given cellular antenna covers the whole cellular band (A-side or B-side,
    anyway), and can be designed to additionally handle the PCS band (or you
    can have PCS-only antennas). There are generally separate transmit and
    receive antennas. CDMA and AMPS will be deployed on distinct channels
    on a given cellular band, so they use the same antenna. The fact that
    on some channels the modulation is analog FM, and on others is digital
    spread-spectrum, is irrelevant.

    Concerning power, I think most cellular companies used the AMPS power
    control protocol. But the transmitter is on for the entire duration of
    the call, whether you are talking or not.
     
  17. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <HamdnRNshI_gR3HdRVn-jg@comcast.com>,
    Richard Ness <richardno@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote:
    >AMPS does have the ability to control the power levels on a phone
    >Some carriers didn't use it however, but it is part of the protocol.
    >
    >"David S" <dwstreeter@spamisnaughty.att.net> wrote in message
    >news:2b1oe05cqjl9fuprlau9qmqtml46a4fm64@4ax.com...
    >> It was my impression that even though CDMA and AMPS use the same frequency
    >> bands, they cannot be on the same exact frequencies at the same time, and,
    >> since they are different types of transmissions, need separate transceivers
    >> and antennae.
    >>
    >> And correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that on AMPS, the phone always
    >> transmits at full power.


    A given cellular antenna covers the whole cellular band (A-side or B-side,
    anyway), and can be designed to additionally handle the PCS band (or you
    can have PCS-only antennas). There are generally separate transmit and
    receive antennas. CDMA and AMPS will be deployed on distinct channels
    on a given cellular band, so they use the same antenna. The fact that
    on some channels the modulation is analog FM, and on others is digital
    spread-spectrum, is irrelevant.

    Concerning power, I think most cellular companies used the AMPS power
    control protocol. But the transmitter is on for the entire duration of
    the call, whether you are talking or not.
     
  18. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <HamdnRNshI_gR3HdRVn-jg@comcast.com>,
    Richard Ness <richardno@damnspam.nessnet.com> wrote:
    >AMPS does have the ability to control the power levels on a phone
    >Some carriers didn't use it however, but it is part of the protocol.
    >
    >"David S" <dwstreeter@spamisnaughty.att.net> wrote in message
    >news:2b1oe05cqjl9fuprlau9qmqtml46a4fm64@4ax.com...
    >> It was my impression that even though CDMA and AMPS use the same frequency
    >> bands, they cannot be on the same exact frequencies at the same time, and,
    >> since they are different types of transmissions, need separate transceivers
    >> and antennae.
    >>
    >> And correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that on AMPS, the phone always
    >> transmits at full power.


    A given cellular antenna covers the whole cellular band (A-side or B-side,
    anyway), and can be designed to additionally handle the PCS band (or you
    can have PCS-only antennas). There are generally separate transmit and
    receive antennas. CDMA and AMPS will be deployed on distinct channels
    on a given cellular band, so they use the same antenna. The fact that
    on some channels the modulation is analog FM, and on others is digital
    spread-spectrum, is irrelevant.

    Concerning power, I think most cellular companies used the AMPS power
    control protocol. But the transmitter is on for the entire duration of
    the call, whether you are talking or not.
     
  19. <snip>

    > spread-spectrum, is irrelevant.
    >
    > Concerning power, I think most cellular companies used the AMPS power
    > control protocol. But the transmitter is on for the entire duration of
    > the call, whether you are talking or not.


    -->Exactly. Speaking from Verizon experience, I haven't seen any area of
    theirs, where they have not used AMPS or CDMA and not used 'power control'.
    It benefits battery life as well as sound quality of the end user(s).

    It's not like it's and "add-on" option the carriers have to buy, nor am I
    sure you can even turn it off if you wanted to.

    Scotty.
     
  20. <snip>

    > spread-spectrum, is irrelevant.
    >
    > Concerning power, I think most cellular companies used the AMPS power
    > control protocol. But the transmitter is on for the entire duration of
    > the call, whether you are talking or not.


    -->Exactly. Speaking from Verizon experience, I haven't seen any area of
    theirs, where they have not used AMPS or CDMA and not used 'power control'.
    It benefits battery life as well as sound quality of the end user(s).

    It's not like it's and "add-on" option the carriers have to buy, nor am I
    sure you can even turn it off if you wanted to.

    Scotty.
     

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