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Page Plus Plans and Data

Discussion in 'alt.cellular.verizon' started by Todd Allcock, Mar 14, 2012.

  1. Todd Allcock

    Todd Allcock Guest

    Apologies to XS11E, who finds Page Plus off-topic (but who won't see this
    anyway since he now filters all posts containing Page Plus!)

    Dealer email today:

    "The 55' and 'Unlimited Talk n Text' Plans Get More Data
     
    "We're very pleased to announce that effective immediately, the 1 GB of
    data that has been running as a special promotion on The 55 plan will now
    become a permanent plan change!
     
    "The double-data "Leap Year Special" which began running January 26th as
    a limited-time promotion will now become a permanent change from 500 MB
    to 1 GB of data on The 55 plan. The price of the plan will remain at
    $55/month, and there are no other changes to this plan.
     
    "Also coming in the very near future, we're increasing the amount of data
    on the Unlimited Talk n Text plan from 20 MB to 100 MB. We're confident
    that this 5X increase in data will be a welcomed plan upgrade for many
    customers who like the plan but need more data. The price of the plan,
    which was just reduced by $5 in December, will remain unchanged at
    $39.95. 
     
    "At the same time, the data overage rate for the Unlimited Talk n Text
    plan is increasing from $.10/MB to $.20/MB. We will be notifying you over
    the next couple of weeks regarding the exact date of the Unlimited Talk n
    Text plan changes.
     
    "The changes will be reflected in updated collateral - flyers and posters
    - which will be available from the Online Marketing Store in the dealer
    portal around the end of the month..."
     



    › See More: Page Plus Plans and Data
  2. sms88

    sms88 Guest

    On 3/14/2012 11:12 AM, Todd Allcock wrote:

    > "We're very pleased to announce that effective immediately, the 1 GB of
    > data that has been running as a special promotion on The 55 plan will now
    > become a permanent plan change!


    I was wondering how long it would take before they realized that the
    type of person that signs up with Pageplus is probably not the type of
    person that is enticed with temporary incentives.
     
  3. sms88

    sms88 Guest

    On 3/14/2012 11:12 AM, Todd Allcock wrote:

    <snip>

    > "We're very pleased to announce that effective immediately, the 1 GB of
    > data that has been running as a special promotion on The 55 plan will now
    > become a permanent plan change!


    While $55 a very good deal compared to the voice and text plus the $20
    300MB data plan on Verizon or the $15 200MB data plan on AT&T, the real
    competition is the $45 unlimited everything plan on AT&T MVNO
    StraightTalk or the $40 unlimited plan on MetroPCS. While neither has as
    good coverage as Pageplus, StraightTalk is probably sufficient for most
    users, and they can always carry a Pageplus phone at $2.50/month for
    those areas where they need it. Yeah, "unlimited" really isn't unlimited
    on StraightTalk but it's at least 2GB. Plus you can use a jailbroken GSM
    iPhone on StraightTalk which is a big deal to a lot of users.

    I think that Pageplus should drop the $40 unlimited talk and text plan
    and keep Talk and Text 1200 at $30 and change "The 55" to "The 45" to
    compete against MetroPCS and StraightTalk.

    When the child-unit goes off to college in the fall I'm going to
    probably have to see how much data she "needs." Since every university
    appears to have campus-wide Wi-Fi, hopefully she won't need much data.
     
  4. SMS

    SMS Guest

    On 3/14/2012 11:12 AM, Todd Allcock wrote:
    > Apologies to XS11E, who finds Page Plus off-topic (but who won't see this
    > anyway since he now filters all posts containing Page Plus!)


    And of course many of us have filtered all posts from
    "xs11eNO@SPAMyahoo.com" so we wouldn't see how upset he is anyway!
     
  5. On 3/14/12 4:33 PM, sms88 wrote:
    > On 3/14/2012 11:12 AM, Todd Allcock wrote:
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >> "We're very pleased to announce that effective immediately, the 1 GB of
    >> data that has been running as a special promotion on The 55 plan will now
    >> become a permanent plan change!

    >
    > While $55 a very good deal compared to the voice and text plus the $20
    > 300MB data plan on Verizon or the $15 200MB data plan on AT&T, the real
    > competition is the $45 unlimited everything plan on AT&T MVNO
    > StraightTalk or the $40 unlimited plan on MetroPCS. While neither has as
    > good coverage as Pageplus, StraightTalk is probably sufficient for most
    > users, and they can always carry a Pageplus phone at $2.50/month for
    > those areas where they need it. Yeah, "unlimited" really isn't unlimited
    > on StraightTalk but it's at least 2GB. Plus you can use a jailbroken GSM
    > iPhone on StraightTalk which is a big deal to a lot of users.
    >
    > I think that Pageplus should drop the $40 unlimited talk and text plan
    > and keep Talk and Text 1200 at $30 and change "The 55" to "The 45" to
    > compete against MetroPCS and StraightTalk.
    >
    > When the child-unit goes off to college in the fall I'm going to
    > probably have to see how much data she "needs." Since every university
    > appears to have campus-wide Wi-Fi, hopefully she won't need much data.


    Straight Talk used to be strictly a VZW MVNO, then they started adding
    some ATT phones. Over time, an incressing percentage of the phones they
    offered moved to ATT. Have they now pulled the plug on VZW?

    I was with ST for a year or so as a VZW user and was happy with them. I
    switched to PP because I wasn't using anywhere near the 1000 minute
    allowance for $30/month.

    PP's pay as you go standard plans allow me to buy just as much time as I
    need-- but I've started to use data now and sure would like to be able
    to use data at a more reasonable rate that the 99 cents/mg they charge
    on the standard plan.

    --
    You're all worthless and weak. Now drop and give me 20.
     
  6. tycho

    tycho Guest

    "Douglas C. Neidermeyer" <sgt@arms.omega.faber.edu> wrote in message
    news:jjrbgm$3rs$1@news.albasani.net...
    > On 3/14/12 4:33 PM, sms88 wrote:
    >> On 3/14/2012 11:12 AM, Todd Allcock wrote:
    >>
    >> <snip>
    >>
    >>> "We're very pleased to announce that effective immediately, the 1 GB of
    >>> data that has been running as a special promotion on The 55 plan will
    >>> now
    >>> become a permanent plan change!

    >>

    *snip*
    >
    > Straight Talk used to be strictly a VZW MVNO, then they started adding
    > some ATT phones. Over time, an incressing percentage of the phones they
    > offered moved to ATT. Have they now pulled the plug on VZW?
    >
    > I was with ST for a year or so as a VZW user and was happy with them. I
    > switched to PP because I wasn't using anywhere near the 1000 minute
    > allowance for $30/month.
    >
    > PP's pay as you go standard plans allow me to buy just as much time as I
    > need-- but I've started to use data now and sure would like to be able to
    > use data at a more reasonable rate that the 99 cents/mg they charge on the
    > standard plan.


    Best you can do is PP's "The 12," where you can get 10 (woo!) MB for $12
    with $0.20/meg overage (along with 250/250 Min/Txt). 250/250/50 would cost
    you $20.

    I'm in exactly the same boat; but with judicious use of "ubiquitous WiFi"
    (tm) I've never used more than a couple of MB on the standard plan in any
    given month.
     
  7. sms88

    sms88 Guest

    On 3/14/2012 5:01 PM, Douglas C. Neidermeyer wrote:

    > Straight Talk used to be strictly a VZW MVNO, then they started adding
    > some ATT phones. Over time, an incressing percentage of the phones they
    > offered moved to ATT. Have they now pulled the plug on VZW?


    I don't think so, but the smart phones they offer are not on VZW, and I
    don't think they let users move VZW smart phones onto ST like PP does.
     
  8. sms88

    sms88 Guest

    On 3/14/2012 8:09 PM, tycho wrote:

    > Best you can do is PP's "The 12," where you can get 10 (woo!) MB for $12
    > with $0.20/meg overage (along with 250/250 Min/Txt). 250/250/50 would cost
    > you $20.
    >
    > I'm in exactly the same boat; but with judicious use of "ubiquitous WiFi"
    > (tm) I've never used more than a couple of MB on the standard plan in any
    > given month.


    What you have to watch out for on Android phones is applications that
    use 3G data surreptitiously for advertising, whenever you have 3G data
    on. The best way to avoid this is to root your phone and install
    droidwall <http://code.google.com/p/droidwall/>.
     
  9. Todd Allcock

    Todd Allcock Guest

    At 14 Mar 2012 13:15:06 -0700 sms88 wrote:
    > On 3/14/2012 11:12 AM, Todd Allcock wrote:
    >
    > > "We're very pleased to announce that effective immediately, the 1 GB

    of
    > > data that has been running as a special promotion on The 55 plan will

    now
    > > become a permanent plan change!

    >
    > I was wondering how long it would take before they realized that the
    > type of person that signs up with Pageplus is probably not the type of
    > person that is enticed with temporary incentives.



    I'd guess they were doing data collection/analysis; determining what the
    "average" 1GB data customer actually used before committing to make it
    permanent.

    You'll note they raised the overage rate as well, probably to scare
    casual users into a bigger plan then they need (which lowers average
    usage) just like the big guys do.
     
  10. tycho

    tycho Guest

    "sms88" <scharf.steven@geemail.com> wrote in message
    news:jjs96h$dq$2@dont-email.me...
    > On 3/14/2012 8:09 PM, tycho wrote:
    >
    >> Best you can do is PP's "The 12," where you can get 10 (woo!) MB for $12
    >> with $0.20/meg overage (along with 250/250 Min/Txt). 250/250/50 would
    >> cost
    >> you $20.
    >>
    >> I'm in exactly the same boat; but with judicious use of "ubiquitous WiFi"
    >> (tm) I've never used more than a couple of MB on the standard plan in any
    >> given month.

    >
    > What you have to watch out for on Android phones is applications that use
    > 3G data surreptitiously for advertising, whenever you have 3G data on. The
    > best way to avoid this is to root your phone and install droidwall
    > <http://code.google.com/p/droidwall/>.


    True. I've got a Pixi -- WebOS -- so I use the "Data toggle" app. A simple
    on-off switch, not nearly as comprehensive as Droidwall, but no data is used
    at all unless I turn it on via that app.
     
  11. Todd Allcock

    Todd Allcock Guest

    At 14 Mar 2012 19:52:40 -0500 Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:
    > In article <jjqvak$on8$1@dont-email.me>,
    > sms88 <scharf.steven@geemail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > When the child-unit goes off to college in the fall I'm going to
    > > probably have to see how much data she "needs." Since every

    university
    > > appears to have campus-wide Wi-Fi, hopefully she won't need much data.

    >
    > Maybe Republic Wireless will be in full swing by then.



    Republic is an interesting idea, but I don't think the $20/month price is
    sustainable unless Republic reinstitutes usage caps when "roaming" on
    cellular. When the beta is over, I expect to see either a price
    increase, data caps, or both (tiered pricing depending on how much cell
    data is used.)

    Until Republic comes our of berta, a savvy user with a smartphone can
    "roll his own" emulation of Republic with Google Voice, a VoIP app, and
    Page Plus, or other prepaid cell service.

    When I was stuck without T-Mo service for a week at home (a landlord
    killed the electrical power to T-Mo's lone tower in my neighborhood
    during a lease dispute!) I conditionally forwarded (forward only if
    unanswered) my T-Mo number to a VoIP line and left WiFi running on my
    phone so I could receive calls to my cell on either WiFi or cellular.
    That was a little clunky (and battery burning!) a half-decade ago, but is
    pretty trivial to set up today with an Android phone.
     
  12. Justin

    Justin Guest

    sms88 wrote on [Thu, 15 Mar 2012 08:59:00 -0700]:
    > On 3/14/2012 8:09 PM, tycho wrote:
    >
    >> I'm in exactly the same boat; but with judicious use of "ubiquitous WiFi"
    >> (tm) I've never used more than a couple of MB on the standard plan in any
    >> given month.

    >
    > It's amazing to see the amount of free Wi-Fi out there, and increasing.
    > One really nice thing is entities with secure Wi-Fi adding a second
    > network for public use. I've seen this on a lot of college campuses that
    > we've visited lately. We visited University of Nevada and I asked the
    > tour guide about Wi-Fi and she told me to stop by the library and they'd
    > give me a free day pass, but many universities don't require this extra
    > step.
    >
    > Last night we ate at a restaurant in Palo Alto, full of Google and
    > Facebook employees, and the restaurant had the Wi-Fi password on the
    > menu and painted on the wall. It's actually becoming rare to NOT have
    > Wi-Fi, and it's not limited to just techie areas.


    You're still in fairyland.

    Most places still do not have wifi
     
  13. tycho

    tycho Guest

    "sms88" <scharf.steven@geemail.com> wrote in message
    news:jjt3kd$7hd$1@dont-email.me...
    > On 3/14/2012 8:09 PM, tycho wrote:
    >
    >> I'm in exactly the same boat; but with judicious use of "ubiquitous WiFi"
    >> (tm) I've never used more than a couple of MB on the standard plan in any
    >> given month.

    >
    > It's amazing to see the amount of free Wi-Fi out there, and increasing.
    > One really nice thing is entities with secure Wi-Fi adding a second
    > network for public use. I've seen this on a lot of college campuses that
    > we've visited lately. We visited University of Nevada and I asked the tour
    > guide about Wi-Fi and she told me to stop by the library and they'd give
    > me a free day pass, but many universities don't require this extra step.
    >
    > Last night we ate at a restaurant in Palo Alto, full of Google and
    > Facebook employees, and the restaurant had the Wi-Fi password on the menu
    > and painted on the wall. It's actually becoming rare to NOT have Wi-Fi,
    > and it's not limited to just techie areas.


    I pretty much agree. I went skiing in Jackson Hole last week. The hotel
    had free WiFi. The airport did not, but I was sitting at the gate outside a
    snack shop that had PW protected WiFi and I wandered in, asked for the PW
    and they gave it to me without an eyeblink. I came back to Chicago and
    returned some DVDs at the library -- free WiFi. I came home and went to a
    Potbelly for a sandwich for dinner -- free WiFi.

    There are many, many places =without= free WiFi (O'Hare, annoyingly enough),
    but otherwise I almost never turn on 3G.
     
  14. tycho

    tycho Guest

    "Justin" <nospam@insightbb.com> wrote in message
    news:jjt5rt$k5p$1@dont-email.me...
    > sms88 wrote on [Thu, 15 Mar 2012 08:59:00 -0700]:
    >> On 3/14/2012 8:09 PM, tycho wrote:
    >>
    >>> I'm in exactly the same boat; but with judicious use of "ubiquitous
    >>> WiFi"
    >>> (tm) I've never used more than a couple of MB on the standard plan in
    >>> any
    >>> given month.

    >>
    >> It's amazing to see the amount of free Wi-Fi out there, and increasing.
    >> One really nice thing is entities with secure Wi-Fi adding a second
    >> network for public use. I've seen this on a lot of college campuses that
    >> we've visited lately. We visited University of Nevada and I asked the
    >> tour guide about Wi-Fi and she told me to stop by the library and they'd
    >> give me a free day pass, but many universities don't require this extra
    >> step.
    >>
    >> Last night we ate at a restaurant in Palo Alto, full of Google and
    >> Facebook employees, and the restaurant had the Wi-Fi password on the
    >> menu and painted on the wall. It's actually becoming rare to NOT have
    >> Wi-Fi, and it's not limited to just techie areas.

    >
    > You're still in fairyland.
    >
    > Most places still do not have wifi


    If you define "most places" by geographic area, I 100% totally agree. But
    if you define it as "most places =I= tend to go" I don't necessarily agree.
    It depends, of course, on where you live, travel and work.

    I just went from a major metro area (Chicago) on a ski trip encompassing
    several very small WY and ID towns (some trendy/touristy; some not at all),
    and was able to access free WiFi in "most places" where I actually wanted to
    connect.

    Was I covered while I was skiing? Nope -- would have had to use 3G (but --
    unlike so many other skiers -- didn't need to "check Facebook" while in the
    middle of carving a beautiful mountain face full of snow). Was I covered
    during the drives through the Teton Pass headed to Grand Targhee, or on the
    way to Yellowstone? Nope. But I was content to look at the scenery, rather
    than some tiny OLED screen. Was I, however, able to access free WiFi at
    nearly every stop along the way, and at my destinations? Yup.

    Never had 3G on for an entire week of Western U.S. travel, yet I was in
    comfortable free wireless data contact for email, radar reports, blogging,
    whatever, whenever I chose to do so. I read about 100 emails, and sent
    perhaps half that. Browsed all my favorite websites every night.

    My compromise: I didn't demand to be "connected" each and every second.
    That's trained behavior. And if I actually did =need= to check email or the
    web =THAT VERY SECOND= I could always turn data back on.

    .... but I never felt the need to do that.
     
  15. tycho

    tycho Guest

    "Todd Allcock" <elecconnec@AnoOspamL.com> wrote in message
    news:jjt4ep$cck$2@dont-email.me...
    > *snip*
    >
    > Until Republic comes our of berta, a savvy user with a smartphone can
    > "roll his own" emulation of Republic with Google Voice, a VoIP app, and
    > Page Plus, or other prepaid cell service.
    >

    Doing that now with great success.

    My total "landline (VoIP)" plus cell bill last month was $7.50 (for my
    long-time landline DID, unlimited inbound, and good 911), plus $4.93 for
    cell phone usage. $12.43.

    To be fair, I also have to pay $24.95 for my 12/1 Mbps Internet service.

    No longer have cable -- I use broadcast HD and a WDTV Live Plus -- so my
    "quadruple play equivalent" costs me $37.38/mo.
     
  16. Justin

    Justin Guest

    tycho wrote on [Thu, 15 Mar 2012 12:22:59 -0500]:
    >
    > "Justin" <nospam@insightbb.com> wrote in message
    > news:jjt5rt$k5p$1@dont-email.me...
    >> sms88 wrote on [Thu, 15 Mar 2012 08:59:00 -0700]:
    >>> On 3/14/2012 8:09 PM, tycho wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I'm in exactly the same boat; but with judicious use of "ubiquitous
    >>>> WiFi"
    >>>> (tm) I've never used more than a couple of MB on the standard plan in
    >>>> any
    >>>> given month.
    >>>
    >>> It's amazing to see the amount of free Wi-Fi out there, and increasing.
    >>> One really nice thing is entities with secure Wi-Fi adding a second
    >>> network for public use. I've seen this on a lot of college campuses that
    >>> we've visited lately. We visited University of Nevada and I asked the
    >>> tour guide about Wi-Fi and she told me to stop by the library and they'd
    >>> give me a free day pass, but many universities don't require this extra
    >>> step.
    >>>
    >>> Last night we ate at a restaurant in Palo Alto, full of Google and
    >>> Facebook employees, and the restaurant had the Wi-Fi password on the
    >>> menu and painted on the wall. It's actually becoming rare to NOT have
    >>> Wi-Fi, and it's not limited to just techie areas.

    >>
    >> You're still in fairyland.
    >>
    >> Most places still do not have wifi

    >
    > If you define "most places" by geographic area, I 100% totally agree. But


    Or most places as buildings.

    > My compromise: I didn't demand to be "connected" each and every second.
    > That's trained behavior. And if I actually did =need= to check email or the
    > web =THAT VERY SECOND= I could always turn data back on.


    That's a difference, I don't WANT to be connected all the time but I NEED to be
    that very second.
     
  17. tycho

    tycho Guest

    "Justin" <nospam@insightbb.com> wrote in message
    news:jjtctm$v2h$1@dont-email.me...
    > tycho wrote on [Thu, 15 Mar 2012 12:22:59 -0500]:
    >>
    >> "Justin" <nospam@insightbb.com> wrote in message
    >> news:jjt5rt$k5p$1@dont-email.me...
    >>> sms88 wrote on [Thu, 15 Mar 2012 08:59:00 -0700]:
    >>>> On 3/14/2012 8:09 PM, tycho wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> I'm in exactly the same boat; but with judicious use of "ubiquitous
    >>>>> WiFi"
    >>>>> (tm) I've never used more than a couple of MB on the standard plan in
    >>>>> any
    >>>>> given month.
    >>>>
    >>>> It's amazing to see the amount of free Wi-Fi out there, and increasing.
    >>>> One really nice thing is entities with secure Wi-Fi adding a second
    >>>> network for public use. I've seen this on a lot of college campuses
    >>>> that
    >>>> we've visited lately. We visited University of Nevada and I asked the
    >>>> tour guide about Wi-Fi and she told me to stop by the library and
    >>>> they'd
    >>>> give me a free day pass, but many universities don't require this extra
    >>>> step.
    >>>>
    >>>> Last night we ate at a restaurant in Palo Alto, full of Google and
    >>>> Facebook employees, and the restaurant had the Wi-Fi password on the
    >>>> menu and painted on the wall. It's actually becoming rare to NOT have
    >>>> Wi-Fi, and it's not limited to just techie areas.
    >>>
    >>> You're still in fairyland.
    >>>
    >>> Most places still do not have wifi

    >>
    >> If you define "most places" by geographic area, I 100% totally agree.
    >> But

    >
    > Or most places as buildings.


    Sure.

    But if you define it as "most buildings I need to be in, or find myself
    near" you get a different answer depending on where you are.

    As it turns out, during the trip that I discussed earlier in this thread,
    "most" (i.e., a majority, =particularly= if defined by time-spent-in) of the
    buildings that I found myself in had free WiFi.

    >> My compromise: I didn't demand to be "connected" each and every second.
    >> That's trained behavior. And if I actually did =need= to check email or
    >> the
    >> web =THAT VERY SECOND= I could always turn data back on.

    >
    > That's a difference, I don't WANT to be connected all the time but I NEED
    > to be
    > that very second.


    Huge difference; agreed.

    For my part, =I= don't at all NEED to be connected every second. Neither my
    work nor my life-style require that now. Never did.

    Even when working at very high level at a Fortune 500 Company, I trained my
    President and CEO that, hey, sometimes I'm =just not available=. Such as,
    when I'm scuba diving off boat in the middle of the Sea of Cortez where
    there is a single emergency sat phone for all aboard. Live with it. I was
    valuable enough that they accepted my terms, I guess...

    If I did need to be connected every second, I'd turn on 3G. But I'm lucky
    that such is not the case.

    Our different needs define our very different outlooks regarding the
    availability of WiFi.
     
  18. NotMe

    NotMe Guest

    "Justin" <nospam@insightbb.com> wrote in message
    news:jjt5rt$k5p$1@dont-email.me...
    > sms88 wrote on [Thu, 15 Mar 2012 08:59:00 -0700]:
    >> On 3/14/2012 8:09 PM, tycho wrote:
    >>
    >>> I'm in exactly the same boat; but with judicious use of "ubiquitous
    >>> WiFi"
    >>> (tm) I've never used more than a couple of MB on the standard plan in
    >>> any
    >>> given month.

    >>
    >> It's amazing to see the amount of free Wi-Fi out there, and increasing.
    >> One really nice thing is entities with secure Wi-Fi adding a second
    >> network for public use. I've seen this on a lot of college campuses that
    >> we've visited lately. We visited University of Nevada and I asked the
    >> tour guide about Wi-Fi and she told me to stop by the library and they'd
    >> give me a free day pass, but many universities don't require this extra
    >> step.
    >>
    >> Last night we ate at a restaurant in Palo Alto, full of Google and
    >> Facebook employees, and the restaurant had the Wi-Fi password on the
    >> menu and painted on the wall. It's actually becoming rare to NOT have
    >> Wi-Fi, and it's not limited to just techie areas.

    >
    > You're still in fairyland.
    >
    > Most places still do not have wifi


    Even Mayberry (Mount Olive) NC (recall Andy Griffin) has wifi, in fact it's
    city wide and it's free.

    Does the include 'everywhere'? No but enough everywhere to satisfy my needs.
     
  19. Justin

    Justin Guest

    NotMe wrote on [Thu, 15 Mar 2012 13:57:58 -0500]:
    >
    > "Justin" <nospam@insightbb.com> wrote in message
    > news:jjt5rt$k5p$1@dont-email.me...
    >> sms88 wrote on [Thu, 15 Mar 2012 08:59:00 -0700]:
    >>> On 3/14/2012 8:09 PM, tycho wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I'm in exactly the same boat; but with judicious use of "ubiquitous
    >>>> WiFi"
    >>>> (tm) I've never used more than a couple of MB on the standard plan in
    >>>> any
    >>>> given month.
    >>>
    >>> It's amazing to see the amount of free Wi-Fi out there, and increasing.
    >>> One really nice thing is entities with secure Wi-Fi adding a second
    >>> network for public use. I've seen this on a lot of college campuses that
    >>> we've visited lately. We visited University of Nevada and I asked the
    >>> tour guide about Wi-Fi and she told me to stop by the library and they'd
    >>> give me a free day pass, but many universities don't require this extra
    >>> step.
    >>>
    >>> Last night we ate at a restaurant in Palo Alto, full of Google and
    >>> Facebook employees, and the restaurant had the Wi-Fi password on the
    >>> menu and painted on the wall. It's actually becoming rare to NOT have
    >>> Wi-Fi, and it's not limited to just techie areas.

    >>
    >> You're still in fairyland.
    >>
    >> Most places still do not have wifi

    >
    > Even Mayberry (Mount Olive) NC (recall Andy Griffin) has wifi, in fact it's
    > city wide and it's free.


    Very few places have town or city wide wifi
     
  20. SMS

    SMS Guest

    On 3/15/2012 11:57 AM, NotMe wrote:

    > Even Mayberry (Mount Olive) NC (recall Andy Griffin) has wifi, in fact it's
    > city wide and it's free.
    >
    > Does the include 'everywhere'? No but enough everywhere to satisfy my needs.


    While most places have Wi-Fi, for the places that don't that's where you
    use 3G.

    I'm at the Salesforce.com show in San Francisco today. Free Wi-Fi? You'd
    be hard pressed to find a trade show where Wi-Fi _isn't_ available.
     

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