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Pagers may be better than cell phones

Discussion in 'alt.cellular.verizon' started by PagerGuy, May 15, 2004.

  1. O/Siris wrote:
    >
    > In article <40AA2FDC.34E4DEEB@spamcop.net>, lglasser@spamcop.net
    > says...
    > > The problem, once again, is that in order to respond to a call/page,
    > > on a cell phone, you have to make a call...
    > >

    >
    > Not true anymore, with SMS.


    But you're still dealing with cellular frequencies.

    Larry
     



    › See More: Pagers may be better than cell phones
  2. Lawrence Glasser wrote:

    <snip>

    >>http://www.gsmarena.com/motorola_a630-659.php

    >
    > Cool!
    >
    > One problem, however, still remains...
    >
    > In my experience, for the areas that I need coverage in, pagers
    > still seem to be the answer. As John mentioned, pagers run on
    > a completely different frequency range than do cell phones.


    There is that. But then, just wait a year or so and look at how things
    are then; things change rather rapidly sometimes :)

    I personally think that the coverage area for GSM services will improve
    greatly in the near-term future, especially with the merging of
    Cingular's and AT&T's networks. I rather hope Cingular will continue
    AT&T's 850MHz GSM deployments, as that band does have better signal
    penetration than 1900MHz GSM. Better signal penetration can mean fewer
    dead spots.

    For the present day, though, I see no reason not to carry both a
    cellphone and a pager. If that's what you need to have proper coverage,
    then that's what you have to do. For some just cellular coverage is
    enough, and some need both, plain and simple.


    > Believe me, if I could carry one unit, that provided me with all
    > the features and coverage that I need, I'd do it in a heartbeat!


    Hehe, me too!

    Oh, speaking of over-stuffed devices....
    http://www.gsmarena.com/motorola_mpx-673.php

    :)
     
  3. Kael Vaeltaja wrote:
    >
    > Lawrence Glasser wrote:
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    > >>http://www.gsmarena.com/motorola_a630-659.php

    > >
    > > Cool!
    > >
    > > One problem, however, still remains...
    > >
    > > In my experience, for the areas that I need coverage in, pagers
    > > still seem to be the answer. As John mentioned, pagers run on
    > > a completely different frequency range than do cell phones.

    >
    > There is that. But then, just wait a year or so and look at how things
    > are then; things change rather rapidly sometimes :)
    >
    > I personally think that the coverage area for GSM services will improve
    > greatly in the near-term future, especially with the merging of
    > Cingular's and AT&T's networks. I rather hope Cingular will continue
    > AT&T's 850MHz GSM deployments, as that band does have better signal
    > penetration than 1900MHz GSM. Better signal penetration can mean fewer
    > dead spots.
    >
    > For the present day, though, I see no reason not to carry both a
    > cellphone and a pager. If that's what you need to have proper coverage,
    > then that's what you have to do. For some just cellular coverage is
    > enough, and some need both, plain and simple.
    >
    > > Believe me, if I could carry one unit, that provided me with all
    > > the features and coverage that I need, I'd do it in a heartbeat!

    >
    > Hehe, me too!


    Personal needs, personal preferences, and a belt, large enough to hang
    all these devices on, without looking like the Frito Bandito! <g>

    Take care!

    Larry
     
  4. honest

    honest Guest

    You guys are forgetting an important issue. Infrastructure and
    reliability. Sprint's servers go down for maintenance at regular
    intervals and they have NO redundancy and don't plan to have it. My
    company checked. And you never know when they're going down. Sprint
    says if you miss a page - so what?!?!
    I've had that happen - more than once. I was on call when it happened
    over New Year's Eve once and the Sprint took their messaging (voice
    and text) servers down for maintenance for two days. Guess how many
    pages I missed? Boy did I hear about that!
    I support several mainframe applications and server apps too. My job,
    like several folks, depends on getting and responding to those pages
    from people and servers.

    So - FYI ladies and gents. Paging companies do have server redundancy,
    failover, etc. And btw. So does Cingular. Yep, my company checked.

    My point: Paging companies are in the business of delivering messages
    to devices. Cell phone companies view that as an ancillary service and
    (I asked this question) do not feel that their servers need to be up
    24X7 as paging companies do.

    All of our techs carry pagers and cell phones.
     
  5. In alt.cellular yeltrabnhoj@email.com wrote:
    > On Sat, 15 May 2004 16:36:23 -0500, Steven J Sobol <sjsobol@JustThe.net>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>In alt.cellular Please invert everything left of the @ to reply <3yeltrabnhoj@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >>> 1) One AA cell runs my 2-way text pager for weeks when used frequently. My
    >>> (three) cellphones (Nokia, Palm and Samsung) need to be restoked with a
    >>> charge daily, or even more often, if used frequently, even if just in text
    >>> modes.

    >
    >>Let's be fair: that's because you only use a lot of juice when you're
    >>receiving or sending a page and that only takes seconds... a cell phone
    >>does a lot more stuff, especially when actually being used...

    >
    > Yes, it does... all of which are irrelevant to the task at hand, getting a
    > message across, no matter what.


    Then why did you bring up the point? I was responding to you, sir.

    >>Hm. That doesn't make sense - it's all radio transmissions, whether to a pager
    >>or not.

    >
    > True, but there's radio,and then there's radio.


    Radio waves act the same no matter which device they're coming from.

    >>That's pretty close to what a lot of the cellular carriers run... although a lot of
    >>them also run on the PCS frequencies.

    >
    > Irrelevant.


    Not irrelevant. Some frequencies penetrate buildings and other structures
    better.

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services, Apple Valley, CA PGP: 0xE3AE35ED
    Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / 888.480.4NET (4638) / sjsobol@JustThe.net
    Domain Names, $9.95/yr, 24x7 service: http://DomainNames.JustThe.net/
    "someone once called me a sofa, but i didn't feel compelled to rush out and buy
    slip covers." -adam brower * Hiroshima '45, Chernobyl '86, Windows 98/2000/2003
     
  6. [ a m z ]

    [ a m z ] Guest

    "Kael Vaeltaja" <kael@spam.free.net.is.good> wrote:
    >
    > I personally think that the coverage area for GSM services
    > will improve greatly in the near-term future, especially with the
    > merging of Cingular's and AT&T's networks. I rather hope
    > Cingular will continue AT&T's 850MHz GSM deployments,
    > as that band does have better signal penetration than
    > 1900MHz GSM. Better signal penetration can mean
    > fewer dead spots.


    There's another reason pagers are nice... The pager company isn't forcing
    you to buy new equipment just to keep up with THEIR idea of progress. Pager
    frequencies generally stay the same.

    Actually, it isn't so much the change of phone as the $100+ I'll have to
    spend on a new desk charger, car charger, extra battery & nice case -- even
    if it is for the same brand of phone. And, since AWS is deliberately
    trashing the compatibility of mMode with phones that are merely a year old,
    looks like I'm in for *another* round of hardware upgrades.
     
  7. Robert M

    Robert M Guest

    In article <f%tqc.436$Tn6.111@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net>,
    "[ a m z ]" <amz.REMOVE@eskimo.THIS.com> wrote:

    > Actually, it isn't so much the change of phone as the $100+ I'll have to
    > spend on a new desk charger, car charger, extra battery & nice case -- even
    > if it is for the same brand of phone. And, since AWS is deliberately
    > trashing the compatibility of mMode with phones that are merely a year old,
    > looks like I'm in for *another* round of hardware upgrades.


    There's an easy cure. Don't stay with AT&T.

    I was in Sams last weekend and the T-Mobile kiosk there has Sony T-610's
    for Free after rebate.
     
  8. [ a m z ]

    [ a m z ] Guest

    "Robert M" <rmarkoff@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > "[ a m z ]" <amz.REMOVE@eskimo.THIS.com> wrote:
    >
    > > Actually, it isn't so much the change of phone as the $100+ I'll have to
    > > spend on a new desk charger, car charger, extra battery & nice case --

    even
    > > if it is for the same brand of phone. And, since AWS is deliberately
    > > trashing the compatibility of mMode with phones that are merely a year

    old,
    > > looks like I'm in for *another* round of hardware upgrades.

    >
    > There's an easy cure. Don't stay with AT&T.
    >
    > I was in Sams last weekend and the T-Mobile kiosk there has Sony T-610's
    > for Free after rebate.


    BTDT with the "new" Ericsson's garbage. But, even if it was good...

    SonyEricsson *still* makes their accessories obsolete like anyone else. And
    this is not a GAIT or multi-band (TDMA/GSM/GPRS) phone. And, yes, there are
    areas in semi-rural WA that have TDMA, but no (or weak) GSM.

    Then again, it does make pretty pictures and wacky noises... and can even
    control an RC car! Just what I need for a business cell phone!
     
  9. Robert M

    Robert M Guest

    In article <qBuqc.473$Tn6.8@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net>,
    "[ a m z ]" <amz.REMOVE@eskimo.THIS.com> wrote:

    > "Robert M" <rmarkoff@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > > "[ a m z ]" <amz.REMOVE@eskimo.THIS.com> wrote:
    > >
    > > > Actually, it isn't so much the change of phone as the $100+ I'll have to
    > > > spend on a new desk charger, car charger, extra battery & nice case --

    > even
    > > > if it is for the same brand of phone. And, since AWS is deliberately
    > > > trashing the compatibility of mMode with phones that are merely a year

    > old,
    > > > looks like I'm in for *another* round of hardware upgrades.

    > >
    > > There's an easy cure. Don't stay with AT&T.
    > >
    > > I was in Sams last weekend and the T-Mobile kiosk there has Sony T-610's
    > > for Free after rebate.

    >
    > BTDT with the "new" Ericsson's garbage. But, even if it was good...
    >
    > SonyEricsson *still* makes their accessories obsolete like anyone else. And
    > this is not a GAIT or multi-band (TDMA/GSM/GPRS) phone. And, yes, there are
    > areas in semi-rural WA that have TDMA, but no (or weak) GSM.
    >
    > Then again, it does make pretty pictures and wacky noises... and can even
    > control an RC car! Just what I need for a business cell phone!


    Then you need either Verizon or SprintPCS so you can have Analog
    coverage.

    And Sprint will give you a very nice Nokia color phone for free.
     
  10. "[ a m z ]" wrote:
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    > Then again, it does make pretty pictures and wacky noises... and can even
    > control an RC car! Just what I need for a business cell phone!


    Screen savers, games, everything-but-the-kitchen-sink...

    Give me a phone that's a phone... Nothing more, nothing less!

    Larry
     
  11. [ a m z ]

    [ a m z ] Guest

    "Robert M" <rmarkoff@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > "[ a m z ]" <amz.REMOVE@eskimo.THIS.com> wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > Actually, it isn't so much the change of phone as the $100+ I'll
    > > > > have to spend on a new desk charger, car charger, extra battery
    > > > > & nice case -- even if it is for the same brand of phone. And,
    > > > > since AWS is deliberately trashing the compatibility of mMode
    > > > > with phones that are merely a year old, looks like I'm in for
    > > > > *another* round of hardware upgrades.
    > > >
    > > > There's an easy cure. Don't stay with AT&T.
    > > >
    > > > I was in Sams last weekend and the T-Mobile kiosk there has
    > > > Sony T-610's for Free after rebate.

    > >
    > > BTDT with the "new" Ericsson's garbage. But, even if it was good...
    > >
    > > SonyEricsson *still* makes their accessories obsolete like anyone else.

    And
    > > this is not a GAIT or multi-band (TDMA/GSM/GPRS) phone. And, yes, there

    are
    > > areas in semi-rural WA that have TDMA, but no (or weak) GSM.
    > >
    > > Then again, it does make pretty pictures and wacky noises... and can

    even
    > > control an RC car! Just what I need for a business cell phone!

    >
    > Then you need either Verizon or SprintPCS so you can have Analog
    > coverage.
    >
    > And Sprint will give you a very nice Nokia color phone for free.


    Both have lousy coverage in the areas right around my home and work. And I
    wonder what the discontinuation of the T-Mobile/Cingular network-sharing
    agreement will do for coverage areas with them.

    But again, you miss my point. ALL of the wireless phone makers deliberately
    make their accessories obsolete. My original point was that my trusty
    little pager has essentially been the same for over SEVEN YEARS. It was
    replaced ONCE, about a year ago, with a smaller/newer unit when the paging
    company moved around some frequencies. But since the cost of the pager is
    included in my monthly bill (~$15 for service, voicemail, pager and taxes),
    it was FREE to me -- not even a shipping cost.
     
  12. Robert M

    Robert M Guest

    In article <Zmvqc.1404$be.398@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net>,
    "[ a m z ]" <amz.REMOVE@eskimo.THIS.com> wrote:

    > ge areas with them.
    >
    > But again, you miss my point. ALL of the wireless phone makers deliberately
    > make their accessories obsolete.


    You must be switching between manufacturers. Sony, Samsung, Sanyo, Nokia
    accessories work on a variety of their models. You have to try hard to
    get phones where you'd need a new car charger. Are you buying bejeweled
    accessories? I found ones 1/3 of OEM prices at Target.
     
  13. "[ a m z ]" wrote:
    >
    > "Robert M" <rmarkoff@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > > "[ a m z ]" <amz.REMOVE@eskimo.THIS.com> wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > > > Actually, it isn't so much the change of phone as the $100+ I'll
    > > > > > have to spend on a new desk charger, car charger, extra battery
    > > > > > & nice case -- even if it is for the same brand of phone. And,
    > > > > > since AWS is deliberately trashing the compatibility of mMode
    > > > > > with phones that are merely a year old, looks like I'm in for
    > > > > > *another* round of hardware upgrades.
    > > > >
    > > > > There's an easy cure. Don't stay with AT&T.
    > > > >
    > > > > I was in Sams last weekend and the T-Mobile kiosk there has
    > > > > Sony T-610's for Free after rebate.
    > > >
    > > > BTDT with the "new" Ericsson's garbage. But, even if it was good...
    > > >
    > > > SonyEricsson *still* makes their accessories obsolete like anyone else.

    > And
    > > > this is not a GAIT or multi-band (TDMA/GSM/GPRS) phone. And, yes, there

    > are
    > > > areas in semi-rural WA that have TDMA, but no (or weak) GSM.
    > > >
    > > > Then again, it does make pretty pictures and wacky noises... and can

    > even
    > > > control an RC car! Just what I need for a business cell phone!

    > >
    > > Then you need either Verizon or SprintPCS so you can have Analog
    > > coverage.
    > >
    > > And Sprint will give you a very nice Nokia color phone for free.

    >
    > Both have lousy coverage in the areas right around my home and work. And I
    > wonder what the discontinuation of the T-Mobile/Cingular network-sharing
    > agreement will do for coverage areas with them.
    >
    > But again, you miss my point. ALL of the wireless phone makers deliberately
    > make their accessories obsolete. My original point was that my trusty
    > little pager has essentially been the same for over SEVEN YEARS. It was
    > replaced ONCE, about a year ago, with a smaller/newer unit when the paging
    > company moved around some frequencies. But since the cost of the pager is
    > included in my monthly bill (~$15 for service, voicemail, pager and taxes),
    > it was FREE to me -- not even a shipping cost.


    While I don't know if all paging carriers are the same, I've got nothing but
    good things to say about Verizon Wireless.

    On the few occasions that I've had to return/exchange a pager, they've always
    delivered one by the next day (no shipping charge, as you mentioned), including
    an envelope for pre-paid shipping (via UPS or FedEx) back to them.

    Now THAT'S customer service!

    Larry
     
  14. [ a m z ] wrote:

    >>I personally think that the coverage area for GSM services
    >>will improve greatly in the near-term future, especially with the
    >>merging of Cingular's and AT&T's networks. I rather hope
    >>Cingular will continue AT&T's 850MHz GSM deployments,
    >>as that band does have better signal penetration than
    >>1900MHz GSM. Better signal penetration can mean
    >>fewer dead spots.

    >
    > There's another reason pagers are nice... The pager company isn't forcing
    > you to buy new equipment just to keep up with THEIR idea of progress. Pager
    > frequencies generally stay the same.


    This isn't entirely fair to cellular.

    Before I go on, a small disclaimer: I'm relatively unfamiliar with the
    historic U.S. cellular landscape. I grew up in Europe, using the
    world's very first GSM operator, so whatever limited knowledge I have is
    somewhat limited to the 900MHz and 1800MHz GSM.

    That said, as I understand it there are four, and only four, GSM bands
    in the world: 850MHz/1900Mhz and 900MHz/1800MHz. The former pair is
    used exclusively in the U.S. and a few fringe regions, and the latter in
    Europe and elsewhere. 900MHz GSM is the oldest of the bunch. In late
    '90s they came up with the 1800MHz GSM, after the operators started to
    encounter some crowding problems on the 900MHz band (AFAIK). I think
    it's roughtly at this point that some U.S. operators decided to jump on
    the GSM bandwagon. Later on when the 850MHz band was opened up, the GSM
    operators started using that frequency in the U.S. as well.

    Pager frequencies may generally stay the same. However, the same goes
    for GSM: my very very first GSM phone from early 1992 works just fine
    even today. Same goes for my 1900MHz Nokia from circa 2000. They may
    be banged up, battery life nonexistent, but they work and you can make
    calls with them.
     
  15. Paw-Paw

    Paw-Paw Guest

    "Lawrence Glasser" <lglasser@spamcop.net> wrote in message
    news:40A8DA9B.1D3DA94D@spamcop.net...
    > Prilosec wrote:
    > >
    > > <snip>
    > >
    > > Sorry, pagers are a dying technology. There is no advantage to them at

    all
    > > for me, and probably not for anyone else fairly soon.

    >
    > UNLESS, once again, you're in a venue where communication is a must, and
    > talking on a cell phone is impossible.
    >
    > Larry


    Like being in the Drug Trade :)
     
  16. Paw-Paw wrote:
    >
    > "Lawrence Glasser" <lglasser@spamcop.net> wrote in message
    > news:40A8DA9B.1D3DA94D@spamcop.net...
    > > Prilosec wrote:
    > > >
    > > > <snip>
    > > >
    > > > Sorry, pagers are a dying technology. There is no advantage to them at

    > all
    > > > for me, and probably not for anyone else fairly soon.

    > >
    > > UNLESS, once again, you're in a venue where communication is a must, and
    > > talking on a cell phone is impossible.
    > >
    > > Larry

    >
    > Like being in the Drug Trade :)


    Yup, you guessed it!

    But seriously, I can think of dozens of circumstances where phones
    are inappropriate, yet communication is still necessary. (Don't
    *even* get me started on the inappropriateness of cell phones in
    restaurants, etc!)

    I work in a surgical setting... While I have to be available to answer
    questions in a timely manner, talking on the phone in the room, or
    leaving the room to make a phone call, are two impossibilities.

    Larry
     
  17. [ a m z ]

    [ a m z ] Guest

    "Kael Vaeltaja" <kael@spam.free.net.is.good> wrote:
    > [ a m z ] wrote:
    >
    > >>I personally think that the coverage area for GSM services
    > >>will improve greatly in the near-term future, especially with the
    > >>merging of Cingular's and AT&T's networks. I rather hope
    > >>Cingular will continue AT&T's 850MHz GSM deployments,
    > >>as that band does have better signal penetration than
    > >>1900MHz GSM. Better signal penetration can mean
    > >>fewer dead spots.

    > >
    > > There's another reason pagers are nice... The pager company isn't

    forcing
    > > you to buy new equipment just to keep up with THEIR idea of progress.

    Pager
    > > frequencies generally stay the same.

    >
    > This isn't entirely fair to cellular.
    >
    > Before I go on, a small disclaimer: I'm relatively unfamiliar with the
    > historic U.S. cellular landscape. I grew up in Europe, using the
    > world's very first GSM operator, so whatever limited knowledge I have is
    > somewhat limited to the 900MHz and 1800MHz GSM.
    >
    > That said, as I understand it there are four, and only four, GSM bands
    > in the world: 850MHz/1900Mhz and 900MHz/1800MHz. The former pair is
    > used exclusively in the U.S. and a few fringe regions, and the latter in
    > Europe and elsewhere. 900MHz GSM is the oldest of the bunch. In late
    > '90s they came up with the 1800MHz GSM, after the operators started to
    > encounter some crowding problems on the 900MHz band (AFAIK). I think
    > it's roughtly at this point that some U.S. operators decided to jump on
    > the GSM bandwagon. Later on when the 850MHz band was opened up, the GSM
    > operators started using that frequency in the U.S. as well.
    >
    > Pager frequencies may generally stay the same. However, the same goes
    > for GSM: my very very first GSM phone from early 1992 works just fine
    > even today. Same goes for my 1900MHz Nokia from circa 2000. They may
    > be banged up, battery life nonexistent, but they work and you can make
    > calls with them.


    The U.S. is constantly "upgrading" (to use the term loosely) the cellular
    system. First we have AMPS. Then TDMA & CDMA. Then GSM. We're currently
    on "2.5G" and on the way to "3G" (UMTS/WCDMA & CDMA2000). Also, the data
    protocols have changes -- at least on AT&T. My previous data / e-mail
    service was PocketNet (CDPD). Then I was *forced* to switch (at my expense)
    to the newer "mMode" (GPRS) data service (and equipment). And now AT&T has
    gone one step further and ignored everyone they sold mMode phones to *last
    year* in favor of the newer *ML flavor of the month -- which, of course, is
    geared toward the new phones they want to sell you. The problem is that
    they never quite finish the last upgrade before starting the migration to
    the next. I thought I was safe in getting a TDMA/GSM/GPRS multi-band phone,
    but not even that offers total protection from AT&T's whims.
     
  18. Lawrence Glasser wrote:
    >
    > "Elmo P. Shagnasty" wrote:
    > >
    > > In article <zuvpc.5027$BZ7.2824@news01.roc.ny>,
    > > "pemalu" <ayah@frontiernet.nettttttttt> wrote:
    > >
    > > > I already have a cell phone that can receive pages at no extra charge and I
    > > > don't have to try to find a working pay phone to return a page. Why spend
    > > > extra money for something that my phone can do already?

    > >
    > > Frequently you can receive pages in places where your cell phone would
    > > never work.
    > >
    > > That's a nice flexibility to have.

    >
    > More flexibility...
    >
    > I've got a Motorola PF 1500 Alphanumeric (2-way) pager with Verizon Wireless
    > service. If I'm in a meeting, or any other place where it's impossible, or
    > INCONSIDERATE (A not-so subtle hint for the cell phone users who insist upon
    > talking in inappropriate venues!), and I'm paged, all I have to do is send
    > a "canned" response to the caller, or type in a custom response on the
    > alphanumeric keyboard.
    >
    > In addition, if the pager is ever out-of-range, and I'm paged, the system
    > stores messages for me and alerts me when I'm back in-range.
    >
    > Larry


    Ooops! That should've been a Motorola T900, not a PF 1500.

    Larry
     
  19. Lawrence Glasser wrote:
    >
    > Isaiah Beard wrote:
    > >
    > > <snip>
    > >
    > > This has always been an illusion. A lack of signal strength indicators
    > > does not mean that you've always got a good signal. it's simply harder
    > > to discern whether you've actually got good coverage on a pager than it
    > > is on a cell phone.

    >
    > Maybe yes, maybe no.
    >
    > It's more of a binary (on/off) phenonenon, rather that incremental.
    >
    > My pager (a 2-way Motorola PF 1500) displays "Receiving Messages" when it's
    > out of transmitting range, and "Storing Messages" when it's completely out
    > of range.
    >
    > And, while not scientifically proven, at least by me, my pager *does* seem
    > to have better coverage than cell phones.
    >
    > I'm frequently in lead-lined, or highly shielded, areas, where *no one's"
    > cell phone gets a signal, yet I'm able to send/receive paging messages.
    >
    > Larry


    Ooops! That should've been a Motorola T900, not a PF 1500.

    Larry
     
  20. "Steven J Sobol" <sjsobol@JustThe.net> wrote in message news:CamdnQqweI4XqzTd4p2dnA@lmi.net...
    > In alt.cellular.sprintpcs O/Siris <0siris@spr?ntpcs.com> wrote:
    >
    > > So does SPCS.

    >
    > Would you happen to have the TAP number? VZW's is archived
    > on Google somewhere in the VZW newsgroup. We should do
    > the same with the Sprint number.
    >

    http://www.notepage.net/tap-phone-numbers.htm
     

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