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Pagers may be better than cell phones

Discussion in 'alt.cellular.verizon' started by PagerGuy, May 15, 2004.

  1. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    "MD" <md@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:tSNzc.1809$w07.1069@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net:

    > "Larry W4CSC" <noone@home.com> wrote:


    > Actually, most 150 & 450 MHz systems are no longer in use, as most
    > infrastructure & device manufacturers have dedicated their frail &
    > limited resources in the 900 MHz band where all the middle/upper-tier
    > carriers have moved to. Substantially all POCSAG, FLEX, and ReFLEX
    > systems in use today in the US are operating between 929-932 MHz. It
    > is cellular & SMR that occupies in the 800 MHz band, with PCS at 1900
    > MHz.
    >
    > Your overall point is correct, but I wanted to make sure the facts
    > were presented as accurately as possible.
    >
    > ---
    > MD
    >


    I'd like to report the 152 and 460 Mhz bands are alive and well in the rest
    of the country! The millions of really cheap pagers will keep these bands
    online for years and years.

    Shhh....don't blab. My little voice-storage pager on a friend's system on
    462.925 uses two-tone paging....like the old fire station equipment on the
    TV show "Rescue 51"...(c; The pager stores two voice pages in its memory
    that can be played back, at will. Keeps me from having to use cellular
    airtime to replay last pages by calling the paging company voicemail
    server. Just press the button and play the page as many times as you like.

    Remember, on digital pagers, you can't hear them scream....(c;

    Code is F159 for my two-tones. Hell, it'll page 30 miles from the nearest
    tower, just fine.

    Larry
     



    › See More: Pagers may be better than cell phones
  2. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    "MD" <md@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:tSNzc.1809$w07.1069@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net:

    > "Larry W4CSC" <noone@home.com> wrote:


    > Actually, most 150 & 450 MHz systems are no longer in use, as most
    > infrastructure & device manufacturers have dedicated their frail &
    > limited resources in the 900 MHz band where all the middle/upper-tier
    > carriers have moved to. Substantially all POCSAG, FLEX, and ReFLEX
    > systems in use today in the US are operating between 929-932 MHz. It
    > is cellular & SMR that occupies in the 800 MHz band, with PCS at 1900
    > MHz.
    >
    > Your overall point is correct, but I wanted to make sure the facts
    > were presented as accurately as possible.
    >
    > ---
    > MD
    >


    I'd like to report the 152 and 460 Mhz bands are alive and well in the rest
    of the country! The millions of really cheap pagers will keep these bands
    online for years and years.

    Shhh....don't blab. My little voice-storage pager on a friend's system on
    462.925 uses two-tone paging....like the old fire station equipment on the
    TV show "Rescue 51"...(c; The pager stores two voice pages in its memory
    that can be played back, at will. Keeps me from having to use cellular
    airtime to replay last pages by calling the paging company voicemail
    server. Just press the button and play the page as many times as you like.

    Remember, on digital pagers, you can't hear them scream....(c;

    Code is F159 for my two-tones. Hell, it'll page 30 miles from the nearest
    tower, just fine.

    Larry
     
  3. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    "MD" <md@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:tSNzc.1809$w07.1069@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net:

    > "Larry W4CSC" <noone@home.com> wrote:


    > Actually, most 150 & 450 MHz systems are no longer in use, as most
    > infrastructure & device manufacturers have dedicated their frail &
    > limited resources in the 900 MHz band where all the middle/upper-tier
    > carriers have moved to. Substantially all POCSAG, FLEX, and ReFLEX
    > systems in use today in the US are operating between 929-932 MHz. It
    > is cellular & SMR that occupies in the 800 MHz band, with PCS at 1900
    > MHz.
    >
    > Your overall point is correct, but I wanted to make sure the facts
    > were presented as accurately as possible.
    >
    > ---
    > MD
    >


    I'd like to report the 152 and 460 Mhz bands are alive and well in the rest
    of the country! The millions of really cheap pagers will keep these bands
    online for years and years.

    Shhh....don't blab. My little voice-storage pager on a friend's system on
    462.925 uses two-tone paging....like the old fire station equipment on the
    TV show "Rescue 51"...(c; The pager stores two voice pages in its memory
    that can be played back, at will. Keeps me from having to use cellular
    airtime to replay last pages by calling the paging company voicemail
    server. Just press the button and play the page as many times as you like.

    Remember, on digital pagers, you can't hear them scream....(c;

    Code is F159 for my two-tones. Hell, it'll page 30 miles from the nearest
    tower, just fine.

    Larry
     
  4. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    "MD" <md@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:tSNzc.1809$w07.1069@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net:

    > "Larry W4CSC" <noone@home.com> wrote:


    > Actually, most 150 & 450 MHz systems are no longer in use, as most
    > infrastructure & device manufacturers have dedicated their frail &
    > limited resources in the 900 MHz band where all the middle/upper-tier
    > carriers have moved to. Substantially all POCSAG, FLEX, and ReFLEX
    > systems in use today in the US are operating between 929-932 MHz. It
    > is cellular & SMR that occupies in the 800 MHz band, with PCS at 1900
    > MHz.
    >
    > Your overall point is correct, but I wanted to make sure the facts
    > were presented as accurately as possible.
    >
    > ---
    > MD
    >


    I'd like to report the 152 and 460 Mhz bands are alive and well in the rest
    of the country! The millions of really cheap pagers will keep these bands
    online for years and years.

    Shhh....don't blab. My little voice-storage pager on a friend's system on
    462.925 uses two-tone paging....like the old fire station equipment on the
    TV show "Rescue 51"...(c; The pager stores two voice pages in its memory
    that can be played back, at will. Keeps me from having to use cellular
    airtime to replay last pages by calling the paging company voicemail
    server. Just press the button and play the page as many times as you like.

    Remember, on digital pagers, you can't hear them scream....(c;

    Code is F159 for my two-tones. Hell, it'll page 30 miles from the nearest
    tower, just fine.

    Larry
     
  5. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    "MD" <md@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:tSNzc.1809$w07.1069@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net:

    > "Larry W4CSC" <noone@home.com> wrote:


    > Actually, most 150 & 450 MHz systems are no longer in use, as most
    > infrastructure & device manufacturers have dedicated their frail &
    > limited resources in the 900 MHz band where all the middle/upper-tier
    > carriers have moved to. Substantially all POCSAG, FLEX, and ReFLEX
    > systems in use today in the US are operating between 929-932 MHz. It
    > is cellular & SMR that occupies in the 800 MHz band, with PCS at 1900
    > MHz.
    >
    > Your overall point is correct, but I wanted to make sure the facts
    > were presented as accurately as possible.
    >
    > ---
    > MD
    >


    I'd like to report the 152 and 460 Mhz bands are alive and well in the rest
    of the country! The millions of really cheap pagers will keep these bands
    online for years and years.

    Shhh....don't blab. My little voice-storage pager on a friend's system on
    462.925 uses two-tone paging....like the old fire station equipment on the
    TV show "Rescue 51"...(c; The pager stores two voice pages in its memory
    that can be played back, at will. Keeps me from having to use cellular
    airtime to replay last pages by calling the paging company voicemail
    server. Just press the button and play the page as many times as you like.

    Remember, on digital pagers, you can't hear them scream....(c;

    Code is F159 for my two-tones. Hell, it'll page 30 miles from the nearest
    tower, just fine.

    Larry
     
  6. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    "MD" <md@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:tSNzc.1809$w07.1069@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net:

    > "Larry W4CSC" <noone@home.com> wrote:


    > Actually, most 150 & 450 MHz systems are no longer in use, as most
    > infrastructure & device manufacturers have dedicated their frail &
    > limited resources in the 900 MHz band where all the middle/upper-tier
    > carriers have moved to. Substantially all POCSAG, FLEX, and ReFLEX
    > systems in use today in the US are operating between 929-932 MHz. It
    > is cellular & SMR that occupies in the 800 MHz band, with PCS at 1900
    > MHz.
    >
    > Your overall point is correct, but I wanted to make sure the facts
    > were presented as accurately as possible.
    >
    > ---
    > MD
    >


    I'd like to report the 152 and 460 Mhz bands are alive and well in the rest
    of the country! The millions of really cheap pagers will keep these bands
    online for years and years.

    Shhh....don't blab. My little voice-storage pager on a friend's system on
    462.925 uses two-tone paging....like the old fire station equipment on the
    TV show "Rescue 51"...(c; The pager stores two voice pages in its memory
    that can be played back, at will. Keeps me from having to use cellular
    airtime to replay last pages by calling the paging company voicemail
    server. Just press the button and play the page as many times as you like.

    Remember, on digital pagers, you can't hear them scream....(c;

    Code is F159 for my two-tones. Hell, it'll page 30 miles from the nearest
    tower, just fine.

    Larry
     
  7. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    "MD" <md@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:tSNzc.1809$w07.1069@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net:

    > "Larry W4CSC" <noone@home.com> wrote:


    > Actually, most 150 & 450 MHz systems are no longer in use, as most
    > infrastructure & device manufacturers have dedicated their frail &
    > limited resources in the 900 MHz band where all the middle/upper-tier
    > carriers have moved to. Substantially all POCSAG, FLEX, and ReFLEX
    > systems in use today in the US are operating between 929-932 MHz. It
    > is cellular & SMR that occupies in the 800 MHz band, with PCS at 1900
    > MHz.
    >
    > Your overall point is correct, but I wanted to make sure the facts
    > were presented as accurately as possible.
    >
    > ---
    > MD
    >


    I'd like to report the 152 and 460 Mhz bands are alive and well in the rest
    of the country! The millions of really cheap pagers will keep these bands
    online for years and years.

    Shhh....don't blab. My little voice-storage pager on a friend's system on
    462.925 uses two-tone paging....like the old fire station equipment on the
    TV show "Rescue 51"...(c; The pager stores two voice pages in its memory
    that can be played back, at will. Keeps me from having to use cellular
    airtime to replay last pages by calling the paging company voicemail
    server. Just press the button and play the page as many times as you like.

    Remember, on digital pagers, you can't hear them scream....(c;

    Code is F159 for my two-tones. Hell, it'll page 30 miles from the nearest
    tower, just fine.

    Larry
     
  8. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    "MD" <md@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:tSNzc.1809$w07.1069@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net:

    > "Larry W4CSC" <noone@home.com> wrote:


    > Actually, most 150 & 450 MHz systems are no longer in use, as most
    > infrastructure & device manufacturers have dedicated their frail &
    > limited resources in the 900 MHz band where all the middle/upper-tier
    > carriers have moved to. Substantially all POCSAG, FLEX, and ReFLEX
    > systems in use today in the US are operating between 929-932 MHz. It
    > is cellular & SMR that occupies in the 800 MHz band, with PCS at 1900
    > MHz.
    >
    > Your overall point is correct, but I wanted to make sure the facts
    > were presented as accurately as possible.
    >
    > ---
    > MD
    >


    I'd like to report the 152 and 460 Mhz bands are alive and well in the rest
    of the country! The millions of really cheap pagers will keep these bands
    online for years and years.

    Shhh....don't blab. My little voice-storage pager on a friend's system on
    462.925 uses two-tone paging....like the old fire station equipment on the
    TV show "Rescue 51"...(c; The pager stores two voice pages in its memory
    that can be played back, at will. Keeps me from having to use cellular
    airtime to replay last pages by calling the paging company voicemail
    server. Just press the button and play the page as many times as you like.

    Remember, on digital pagers, you can't hear them scream....(c;

    Code is F159 for my two-tones. Hell, it'll page 30 miles from the nearest
    tower, just fine.

    Larry
     
  9. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    "MD" <md@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:tSNzc.1809$w07.1069@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net:

    > "Larry W4CSC" <noone@home.com> wrote:


    > Actually, most 150 & 450 MHz systems are no longer in use, as most
    > infrastructure & device manufacturers have dedicated their frail &
    > limited resources in the 900 MHz band where all the middle/upper-tier
    > carriers have moved to. Substantially all POCSAG, FLEX, and ReFLEX
    > systems in use today in the US are operating between 929-932 MHz. It
    > is cellular & SMR that occupies in the 800 MHz band, with PCS at 1900
    > MHz.
    >
    > Your overall point is correct, but I wanted to make sure the facts
    > were presented as accurately as possible.
    >
    > ---
    > MD
    >


    I'd like to report the 152 and 460 Mhz bands are alive and well in the rest
    of the country! The millions of really cheap pagers will keep these bands
    online for years and years.

    Shhh....don't blab. My little voice-storage pager on a friend's system on
    462.925 uses two-tone paging....like the old fire station equipment on the
    TV show "Rescue 51"...(c; The pager stores two voice pages in its memory
    that can be played back, at will. Keeps me from having to use cellular
    airtime to replay last pages by calling the paging company voicemail
    server. Just press the button and play the page as many times as you like.

    Remember, on digital pagers, you can't hear them scream....(c;

    Code is F159 for my two-tones. Hell, it'll page 30 miles from the nearest
    tower, just fine.

    Larry
     
  10. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    "MD" <md@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:tSNzc.1809$w07.1069@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net:

    > "Larry W4CSC" <noone@home.com> wrote:


    > Actually, most 150 & 450 MHz systems are no longer in use, as most
    > infrastructure & device manufacturers have dedicated their frail &
    > limited resources in the 900 MHz band where all the middle/upper-tier
    > carriers have moved to. Substantially all POCSAG, FLEX, and ReFLEX
    > systems in use today in the US are operating between 929-932 MHz. It
    > is cellular & SMR that occupies in the 800 MHz band, with PCS at 1900
    > MHz.
    >
    > Your overall point is correct, but I wanted to make sure the facts
    > were presented as accurately as possible.
    >
    > ---
    > MD
    >


    I'd like to report the 152 and 460 Mhz bands are alive and well in the rest
    of the country! The millions of really cheap pagers will keep these bands
    online for years and years.

    Shhh....don't blab. My little voice-storage pager on a friend's system on
    462.925 uses two-tone paging....like the old fire station equipment on the
    TV show "Rescue 51"...(c; The pager stores two voice pages in its memory
    that can be played back, at will. Keeps me from having to use cellular
    airtime to replay last pages by calling the paging company voicemail
    server. Just press the button and play the page as many times as you like.

    Remember, on digital pagers, you can't hear them scream....(c;

    Code is F159 for my two-tones. Hell, it'll page 30 miles from the nearest
    tower, just fine.

    Larry
     
  11. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    "MD" <md@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:tSNzc.1809$w07.1069@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net:

    > "Larry W4CSC" <noone@home.com> wrote:


    > Actually, most 150 & 450 MHz systems are no longer in use, as most
    > infrastructure & device manufacturers have dedicated their frail &
    > limited resources in the 900 MHz band where all the middle/upper-tier
    > carriers have moved to. Substantially all POCSAG, FLEX, and ReFLEX
    > systems in use today in the US are operating between 929-932 MHz. It
    > is cellular & SMR that occupies in the 800 MHz band, with PCS at 1900
    > MHz.
    >
    > Your overall point is correct, but I wanted to make sure the facts
    > were presented as accurately as possible.
    >
    > ---
    > MD
    >


    I'd like to report the 152 and 460 Mhz bands are alive and well in the rest
    of the country! The millions of really cheap pagers will keep these bands
    online for years and years.

    Shhh....don't blab. My little voice-storage pager on a friend's system on
    462.925 uses two-tone paging....like the old fire station equipment on the
    TV show "Rescue 51"...(c; The pager stores two voice pages in its memory
    that can be played back, at will. Keeps me from having to use cellular
    airtime to replay last pages by calling the paging company voicemail
    server. Just press the button and play the page as many times as you like.

    Remember, on digital pagers, you can't hear them scream....(c;

    Code is F159 for my two-tones. Hell, it'll page 30 miles from the nearest
    tower, just fine.

    Larry
     
  12. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    "MD" <md@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:tSNzc.1809$w07.1069@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net:

    > "Larry W4CSC" <noone@home.com> wrote:


    > Actually, most 150 & 450 MHz systems are no longer in use, as most
    > infrastructure & device manufacturers have dedicated their frail &
    > limited resources in the 900 MHz band where all the middle/upper-tier
    > carriers have moved to. Substantially all POCSAG, FLEX, and ReFLEX
    > systems in use today in the US are operating between 929-932 MHz. It
    > is cellular & SMR that occupies in the 800 MHz band, with PCS at 1900
    > MHz.
    >
    > Your overall point is correct, but I wanted to make sure the facts
    > were presented as accurately as possible.
    >
    > ---
    > MD
    >


    I'd like to report the 152 and 460 Mhz bands are alive and well in the rest
    of the country! The millions of really cheap pagers will keep these bands
    online for years and years.

    Shhh....don't blab. My little voice-storage pager on a friend's system on
    462.925 uses two-tone paging....like the old fire station equipment on the
    TV show "Rescue 51"...(c; The pager stores two voice pages in its memory
    that can be played back, at will. Keeps me from having to use cellular
    airtime to replay last pages by calling the paging company voicemail
    server. Just press the button and play the page as many times as you like.

    Remember, on digital pagers, you can't hear them scream....(c;

    Code is F159 for my two-tones. Hell, it'll page 30 miles from the nearest
    tower, just fine.

    Larry
     
  13. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    "MD" <md@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:tSNzc.1809$w07.1069@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net:

    > "Larry W4CSC" <noone@home.com> wrote:


    > Actually, most 150 & 450 MHz systems are no longer in use, as most
    > infrastructure & device manufacturers have dedicated their frail &
    > limited resources in the 900 MHz band where all the middle/upper-tier
    > carriers have moved to. Substantially all POCSAG, FLEX, and ReFLEX
    > systems in use today in the US are operating between 929-932 MHz. It
    > is cellular & SMR that occupies in the 800 MHz band, with PCS at 1900
    > MHz.
    >
    > Your overall point is correct, but I wanted to make sure the facts
    > were presented as accurately as possible.
    >
    > ---
    > MD
    >


    I'd like to report the 152 and 460 Mhz bands are alive and well in the rest
    of the country! The millions of really cheap pagers will keep these bands
    online for years and years.

    Shhh....don't blab. My little voice-storage pager on a friend's system on
    462.925 uses two-tone paging....like the old fire station equipment on the
    TV show "Rescue 51"...(c; The pager stores two voice pages in its memory
    that can be played back, at will. Keeps me from having to use cellular
    airtime to replay last pages by calling the paging company voicemail
    server. Just press the button and play the page as many times as you like.

    Remember, on digital pagers, you can't hear them scream....(c;

    Code is F159 for my two-tones. Hell, it'll page 30 miles from the nearest
    tower, just fine.

    Larry
     
  14. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    "MD" <md@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:tSNzc.1809$w07.1069@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net:

    > "Larry W4CSC" <noone@home.com> wrote:


    > Actually, most 150 & 450 MHz systems are no longer in use, as most
    > infrastructure & device manufacturers have dedicated their frail &
    > limited resources in the 900 MHz band where all the middle/upper-tier
    > carriers have moved to. Substantially all POCSAG, FLEX, and ReFLEX
    > systems in use today in the US are operating between 929-932 MHz. It
    > is cellular & SMR that occupies in the 800 MHz band, with PCS at 1900
    > MHz.
    >
    > Your overall point is correct, but I wanted to make sure the facts
    > were presented as accurately as possible.
    >
    > ---
    > MD
    >


    I'd like to report the 152 and 460 Mhz bands are alive and well in the rest
    of the country! The millions of really cheap pagers will keep these bands
    online for years and years.

    Shhh....don't blab. My little voice-storage pager on a friend's system on
    462.925 uses two-tone paging....like the old fire station equipment on the
    TV show "Rescue 51"...(c; The pager stores two voice pages in its memory
    that can be played back, at will. Keeps me from having to use cellular
    airtime to replay last pages by calling the paging company voicemail
    server. Just press the button and play the page as many times as you like.

    Remember, on digital pagers, you can't hear them scream....(c;

    Code is F159 for my two-tones. Hell, it'll page 30 miles from the nearest
    tower, just fine.

    Larry
     
  15. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    "MD" <md@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:tSNzc.1809$w07.1069@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net:

    > "Larry W4CSC" <noone@home.com> wrote:


    > Actually, most 150 & 450 MHz systems are no longer in use, as most
    > infrastructure & device manufacturers have dedicated their frail &
    > limited resources in the 900 MHz band where all the middle/upper-tier
    > carriers have moved to. Substantially all POCSAG, FLEX, and ReFLEX
    > systems in use today in the US are operating between 929-932 MHz. It
    > is cellular & SMR that occupies in the 800 MHz band, with PCS at 1900
    > MHz.
    >
    > Your overall point is correct, but I wanted to make sure the facts
    > were presented as accurately as possible.
    >
    > ---
    > MD
    >


    I'd like to report the 152 and 460 Mhz bands are alive and well in the rest
    of the country! The millions of really cheap pagers will keep these bands
    online for years and years.

    Shhh....don't blab. My little voice-storage pager on a friend's system on
    462.925 uses two-tone paging....like the old fire station equipment on the
    TV show "Rescue 51"...(c; The pager stores two voice pages in its memory
    that can be played back, at will. Keeps me from having to use cellular
    airtime to replay last pages by calling the paging company voicemail
    server. Just press the button and play the page as many times as you like.

    Remember, on digital pagers, you can't hear them scream....(c;

    Code is F159 for my two-tones. Hell, it'll page 30 miles from the nearest
    tower, just fine.

    Larry
     
  16. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    "MD" <md@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:tSNzc.1809$w07.1069@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net:

    > "Larry W4CSC" <noone@home.com> wrote:


    > Actually, most 150 & 450 MHz systems are no longer in use, as most
    > infrastructure & device manufacturers have dedicated their frail &
    > limited resources in the 900 MHz band where all the middle/upper-tier
    > carriers have moved to. Substantially all POCSAG, FLEX, and ReFLEX
    > systems in use today in the US are operating between 929-932 MHz. It
    > is cellular & SMR that occupies in the 800 MHz band, with PCS at 1900
    > MHz.
    >
    > Your overall point is correct, but I wanted to make sure the facts
    > were presented as accurately as possible.
    >
    > ---
    > MD
    >


    I'd like to report the 152 and 460 Mhz bands are alive and well in the rest
    of the country! The millions of really cheap pagers will keep these bands
    online for years and years.

    Shhh....don't blab. My little voice-storage pager on a friend's system on
    462.925 uses two-tone paging....like the old fire station equipment on the
    TV show "Rescue 51"...(c; The pager stores two voice pages in its memory
    that can be played back, at will. Keeps me from having to use cellular
    airtime to replay last pages by calling the paging company voicemail
    server. Just press the button and play the page as many times as you like.

    Remember, on digital pagers, you can't hear them scream....(c;

    Code is F159 for my two-tones. Hell, it'll page 30 miles from the nearest
    tower, just fine.

    Larry
     
  17. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    "MD" <md@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:tSNzc.1809$w07.1069@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net:

    > "Larry W4CSC" <noone@home.com> wrote:


    > Actually, most 150 & 450 MHz systems are no longer in use, as most
    > infrastructure & device manufacturers have dedicated their frail &
    > limited resources in the 900 MHz band where all the middle/upper-tier
    > carriers have moved to. Substantially all POCSAG, FLEX, and ReFLEX
    > systems in use today in the US are operating between 929-932 MHz. It
    > is cellular & SMR that occupies in the 800 MHz band, with PCS at 1900
    > MHz.
    >
    > Your overall point is correct, but I wanted to make sure the facts
    > were presented as accurately as possible.
    >
    > ---
    > MD
    >


    I'd like to report the 152 and 460 Mhz bands are alive and well in the rest
    of the country! The millions of really cheap pagers will keep these bands
    online for years and years.

    Shhh....don't blab. My little voice-storage pager on a friend's system on
    462.925 uses two-tone paging....like the old fire station equipment on the
    TV show "Rescue 51"...(c; The pager stores two voice pages in its memory
    that can be played back, at will. Keeps me from having to use cellular
    airtime to replay last pages by calling the paging company voicemail
    server. Just press the button and play the page as many times as you like.

    Remember, on digital pagers, you can't hear them scream....(c;

    Code is F159 for my two-tones. Hell, it'll page 30 miles from the nearest
    tower, just fine.

    Larry
     
  18. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    "MD" <md@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:tSNzc.1809$w07.1069@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net:

    > "Larry W4CSC" <noone@home.com> wrote:


    > Actually, most 150 & 450 MHz systems are no longer in use, as most
    > infrastructure & device manufacturers have dedicated their frail &
    > limited resources in the 900 MHz band where all the middle/upper-tier
    > carriers have moved to. Substantially all POCSAG, FLEX, and ReFLEX
    > systems in use today in the US are operating between 929-932 MHz. It
    > is cellular & SMR that occupies in the 800 MHz band, with PCS at 1900
    > MHz.
    >
    > Your overall point is correct, but I wanted to make sure the facts
    > were presented as accurately as possible.
    >
    > ---
    > MD
    >


    I'd like to report the 152 and 460 Mhz bands are alive and well in the rest
    of the country! The millions of really cheap pagers will keep these bands
    online for years and years.

    Shhh....don't blab. My little voice-storage pager on a friend's system on
    462.925 uses two-tone paging....like the old fire station equipment on the
    TV show "Rescue 51"...(c; The pager stores two voice pages in its memory
    that can be played back, at will. Keeps me from having to use cellular
    airtime to replay last pages by calling the paging company voicemail
    server. Just press the button and play the page as many times as you like.

    Remember, on digital pagers, you can't hear them scream....(c;

    Code is F159 for my two-tones. Hell, it'll page 30 miles from the nearest
    tower, just fine.

    Larry
     
  19. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    "MD" <md@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:tSNzc.1809$w07.1069@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net:

    > "Larry W4CSC" <noone@home.com> wrote:


    > Actually, most 150 & 450 MHz systems are no longer in use, as most
    > infrastructure & device manufacturers have dedicated their frail &
    > limited resources in the 900 MHz band where all the middle/upper-tier
    > carriers have moved to. Substantially all POCSAG, FLEX, and ReFLEX
    > systems in use today in the US are operating between 929-932 MHz. It
    > is cellular & SMR that occupies in the 800 MHz band, with PCS at 1900
    > MHz.
    >
    > Your overall point is correct, but I wanted to make sure the facts
    > were presented as accurately as possible.
    >
    > ---
    > MD
    >


    I'd like to report the 152 and 460 Mhz bands are alive and well in the rest
    of the country! The millions of really cheap pagers will keep these bands
    online for years and years.

    Shhh....don't blab. My little voice-storage pager on a friend's system on
    462.925 uses two-tone paging....like the old fire station equipment on the
    TV show "Rescue 51"...(c; The pager stores two voice pages in its memory
    that can be played back, at will. Keeps me from having to use cellular
    airtime to replay last pages by calling the paging company voicemail
    server. Just press the button and play the page as many times as you like.

    Remember, on digital pagers, you can't hear them scream....(c;

    Code is F159 for my two-tones. Hell, it'll page 30 miles from the nearest
    tower, just fine.

    Larry
     
  20. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    "MD" <md@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:tSNzc.1809$w07.1069@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net:

    > "Larry W4CSC" <noone@home.com> wrote:


    > Actually, most 150 & 450 MHz systems are no longer in use, as most
    > infrastructure & device manufacturers have dedicated their frail &
    > limited resources in the 900 MHz band where all the middle/upper-tier
    > carriers have moved to. Substantially all POCSAG, FLEX, and ReFLEX
    > systems in use today in the US are operating between 929-932 MHz. It
    > is cellular & SMR that occupies in the 800 MHz band, with PCS at 1900
    > MHz.
    >
    > Your overall point is correct, but I wanted to make sure the facts
    > were presented as accurately as possible.
    >
    > ---
    > MD
    >


    I'd like to report the 152 and 460 Mhz bands are alive and well in the rest
    of the country! The millions of really cheap pagers will keep these bands
    online for years and years.

    Shhh....don't blab. My little voice-storage pager on a friend's system on
    462.925 uses two-tone paging....like the old fire station equipment on the
    TV show "Rescue 51"...(c; The pager stores two voice pages in its memory
    that can be played back, at will. Keeps me from having to use cellular
    airtime to replay last pages by calling the paging company voicemail
    server. Just press the button and play the page as many times as you like.

    Remember, on digital pagers, you can't hear them scream....(c;

    Code is F159 for my two-tones. Hell, it'll page 30 miles from the nearest
    tower, just fine.

    Larry
     

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