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passive repeater antenna ?

Discussion in 'alt.cellular.verizon' started by brian s., Sep 15, 2003.

  1. brian s.

    brian s. Guest

    Is it possible just to buy an antenna and put it outside3 my window at home
    and boost my signal? i don't want anything attached to my phone and i don't
    have the funds to buy a repeater that i have seen for 499 that does a whole
    building. i am looking for just enough for a room.



    › See More: passive repeater antenna ?
  2. VZW Guy

    VZW Guy Guest

    I made that comment before to someone, I know it works with the one you
    plug into the abck of the phone. havent tried with the cordless one. But
    I dont see why it shouldn't. If your able to pick up a signal outside
    your house, but not inside, it should work.
    --
    Statements made by me are of my opinion and knowledge, and do not
    express those by Verizon Wireless(R).
    Any information I give is subject to change without notice, and may not
    be completely accurate.


    "brian s." <deadhead73@comcast.net> wrote in article
    <gQCdneGO8b_XsfuiU-KYuQ@comcast.com>:
    > Is it possible just to buy an antenna and put it outside3 my window at home
    > and boost my signal? i don't want anything attached to my phone and i don't
    > have the funds to buy a repeater that i have seen for 499 that does a whole
    > building. i am looking for just enough for a room.
    >
    >
    >
    >


    [posted via phonescoop.com]
  3. I've never used one, but I seriously don't understand how a "passive
    repeater" could work. I don't understand how a piece of metal outside
    the room could increase the signal inside the room without either a
    direct physical connection to the phone, or power amplification.

    How well does a TV antenna work if it's not actually hooked up to the
    TV? Same principle at work here...


    vzwguy2004@yahoo.com (VZW Guy) wrote in article
    <vmcbrmee4r4s5c@corp.supernews.com>:
    >
    > I made that comment before to someone, I know it works with the one you
    > plug into the abck of the phone. havent tried with the cordless one. But
    > I dont see why it shouldn't. If your able to pick up a signal outside
    > your house, but not inside, it should work.
    > --
    > Statements made by me are of my opinion and knowledge, and do not
    > express those by Verizon Wireless(R).
    > Any information I give is subject to change without notice, and may not
    > be completely accurate.
    >
    >
    > "brian s." <deadhead73@comcast.net> wrote in article
    > <gQCdneGO8b_XsfuiU-KYuQ@comcast.com>:
    > > Is it possible just to buy an antenna and put it outside3 my window at home
    > > and boost my signal? i don't want anything attached to my phone and i don't
    > > have the funds to buy a repeater that i have seen for 499 that does a whole
    > > building. i am looking for just enough for a room.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >

    >
    > [posted via phonescoop.com]


    [posted via phonescoop.com]
  4. Stay away from the passive repeaters. Anything that does not connect to
    your phone or does not use a power source usually does not work. If you
    are on a budget look for a magnet mount antenna that you can put on
    something metal next to or outside of a window. You will have a cord
    connected to your phone - but your results will be much better. Shop
    around and look for something like a "drive-time kit" for your phone.

    "brian s." <deadhead73@comcast.net> wrote in article
    <gQCdneGO8b_XsfuiU-KYuQ@comcast.com>:
    > Is it possible just to buy an antenna and put it outside3 my window at home
    > and boost my signal? i don't want anything attached to my phone and i don't
    > have the funds to buy a repeater that i have seen for 499 that does a whole
    > building. i am looking for just enough for a room.
    >
    >
    >
    >


    [posted via phonescoop.com]
  5. VZW Guy

    VZW Guy Guest

    If you read my reply, I said i dont know wether the cordless one would
    work,, How do the work in a car?? I would think same principle if
    sticking it to your window of your house.. but I DONT KNOW, I HAVE NEVER
    TRIED!

    --
    Statements made by me are of my opinion and knowledge, and do not
    express those by Verizon Wireless(R).
    Any information I give is subject to change without notice, and may not
    be completely accurate.


    anotherbozotheclown@yahoo.com (Bozo The Clown) wrote in article
    <vmcd6jpf9sn58a@corp.supernews.com>:
    > I've never used one, but I seriously don't understand how a "passive
    > repeater" could work. I don't understand how a piece of metal outside
    > the room could increase the signal inside the room without either a
    > direct physical connection to the phone, or power amplification.
    >
    > How well does a TV antenna work if it's not actually hooked up to the
    > TV? Same principle at work here...
    >
    >
    > vzwguy2004@yahoo.com (VZW Guy) wrote in article
    > <vmcbrmee4r4s5c@corp.supernews.com>:
    > >
    > > I made that comment before to someone, I know it works with the one you
    > > plug into the abck of the phone. havent tried with the cordless one. But
    > > I dont see why it shouldn't. If your able to pick up a signal outside
    > > your house, but not inside, it should work.
    > > --
    > > Statements made by me are of my opinion and knowledge, and do not
    > > express those by Verizon Wireless(R).
    > > Any information I give is subject to change without notice, and may not
    > > be completely accurate.
    > >
    > >
    > > "brian s." <deadhead73@comcast.net> wrote in article
    > > <gQCdneGO8b_XsfuiU-KYuQ@comcast.com>:
    > > > Is it possible just to buy an antenna and put it outside3 my window at home
    > > > and boost my signal? i don't want anything attached to my phone and i don't
    > > > have the funds to buy a repeater that i have seen for 499 that does a whole
    > > > building. i am looking for just enough for a room.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > > [posted via phonescoop.com]

    >
    > [posted via phonescoop.com]


    [posted via phonescoop.com]
  6. brian s.

    brian s. Guest

    thanks for the info... i would love not to be corded to the phone. But i
    guess with a limited budget what can you do.

    here is how it works, the phone rings i pick it up, if i move 1 or 2 steps
    out of the area i have it set up to charge in then 20 seconds into the call,
    beeeep dropped call. then my cordless phone rings and it is the same person
    on there cell phone. we have it set up so we can use the pool of minutes we
    got intstead of having to call ones home or business, instead of mobile to
    mobile. what is funny is every phone she has bought works well in here but
    mine does not. currently hers is the a530

    But, my theory, though it may sound silly, is that she is from DE and on a
    different sid or tower than i am here in NJ. maybe pullinga better signal
    from her location, since they are both close towers. i am not sure how it
    exactly works but does that sound right? the person at the store said the
    only way to change the tower to connect to would be to change my mobile
    phone number so it would orignate in a different site. at the store it was
    15 bucks, on the phone free.

    maybe a 228 in her area and then not change it?


    "Brian Johnson" <BrianJ42@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:vmcdnmtl8vo319@corp.supernews.com...
    > Stay away from the passive repeaters. Anything that does not connect to
    > your phone or does not use a power source usually does not work. If you
    > are on a budget look for a magnet mount antenna that you can put on
    > something metal next to or outside of a window. You will have a cord
    > connected to your phone - but your results will be much better. Shop
    > around and look for something like a "drive-time kit" for your phone.
    >
    > "brian s." <deadhead73@comcast.net> wrote in article
    > <gQCdneGO8b_XsfuiU-KYuQ@comcast.com>:
    > > Is it possible just to buy an antenna and put it outside3 my window at

    home
    > > and boost my signal? i don't want anything attached to my phone and i

    don't
    > > have the funds to buy a repeater that i have seen for 499 that does a

    whole
    > > building. i am looking for just enough for a room.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >

    >
    > [posted via phonescoop.com]
  7. little John

    little John Guest

    VZW Guy wrote:
    > If you read my reply, I said i dont know wether the cordless one would
    > work,, How do the work in a car?? I would think same principle if
    > sticking it to your window of your house.. but I DONT KNOW, I HAVE NEVER
    > TRIED!
    >
    >


    Hey VZW Guy,
    It doesn't take much for you to get your panties in a wad does it?
    Take a pill, chill out!
  8. Bozo, this may help you....
    Think of a large metal wall between you and a cell site.
    It might be something like metal-foil backing on your house insulation.
    The metal greatly reduces the "inside" signal strength.

    An outside antenna picks up a decent signal from the cell site,
    and "some" (maybe half) of the received signal is carried by a
    matched cable through the wall to an "inside" antenna.

    If everything works well, the signal re-radiated by the "inside" antenna
    gives a strong-enough signal for your handset to use.
    (In case that's the surprise to you, it really can work that way.)

    For the reverse path, where the handset is transmitting,
    symmetry applies, making it work in both directions.

    Better results can occur where the "outside" antenna is a directional
    array, which intercepts relatively more power from the cell site,
    and also concentrates the power from the handset for the reverse path.

    Depending on the indoor geometry, some directivity can be useful there, =
    too.

    There are some tricky antenna-design and matching problems involved.
    Don't expect perfect results if you try to cobble this together on your =
    own.
    ---JRC---

    "Bozo The Clown" <anotherbozotheclown@yahoo.com> wrote in message =
    news:vmcd6jpf9sn58a@corp.supernews.com...
    > I've never used one, but I seriously don't understand how a "passive
    > repeater" could work. I don't understand how a piece of metal =

    outside
    > the room could increase the signal inside the room without either a
    > direct physical connection to the phone, or power amplification.
    >=20
  9. 127.0.0.1

    127.0.0.1 Guest

    "brian s." <deadhead73@comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:gQCdneGO8b_XsfuiU-KYuQ@comcast.com...
    > Is it possible just to buy an antenna and put it outside3 my window at

    home
    > and boost my signal? i don't want anything attached to my phone and i

    don't
    > have the funds to buy a repeater that i have seen for 499 that does a

    whole
    > building. i am looking for just enough for a room.
    >
    >



    there is a passive antenna on the market that is sometimes given free...

    it is a small sticker type antenna booster.
    you place it on the middle of your forehead and it will increase your mobile
    phones range by up to 30 miles.
  10. Richard Ness

    Richard Ness Guest

    Plain and simple physics at work here.
    Gain and attenuation, inverse square rule....

    Simply put, the signal outside must be very strong to overcome the losses.

    But the problem is the return path, it's only 2mW or less digital (or .6W
    analog).
    Then subtract the attenuation from the coax, connectors, etc and there just
    isn't much left. If the site is any distance away, inverse square rule
    applies.

    Bottom line, in all but a very few isolated cases, a passive repeater will
    not work.
    You have to have a direct physical connection or bi-directional
    amplification
    for a 'repeater' to work, at all.

    Isolated case: A heavily shielded building very close to a site. Close
    enough so that
    the very weak return signal from the phone is strong enough so it can be
    picked up.
    Even after all that attenuation. The passive repeater is essentially just a
    hole in the
    building's (room's) shielding for the signal to pass through.



    "brian s." <deadhead73@comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:gQCdneGO8b_XsfuiU-KYuQ@comcast.com...
    > Is it possible just to buy an antenna and put it outside3 my window at

    home
    > and boost my signal? i don't want anything attached to my phone and i

    don't
    > have the funds to buy a repeater that i have seen for 499 that does a

    whole
    > building. i am looking for just enough for a room.
    >
    >
    >
    >
  11. I see what you're saying, I'm just wondering if they're be enough signal
    for to work in practice. With a big enough antenna outside I suppose
    anything is possible, but I'm guessing most of the passive repeaters are
    small stub antennas with very little gain.

    I'd have to imagine a direct connection to the phone would be infinitely
    better though.

    "John R. Copeland" <jcopelan@columbus.rr.com> wrote in article
    <urs9b.6155$uJ2.1925@fe3.columbus.rr.com>:
    > Bozo, this may help you....
    > Think of a large metal wall between you and a cell site.
    > It might be something like metal-foil backing on your house insulation.
    > The metal greatly reduces the "inside" signal strength.
    >
    > An outside antenna picks up a decent signal from the cell site,
    > and "some" (maybe half) of the received signal is carried by a
    > matched cable through the wall to an "inside" antenna.
    >
    > If everything works well, the signal re-radiated by the "inside" antenna
    > gives a strong-enough signal for your handset to use.
    > (In case that's the surprise to you, it really can work that way.)
    >
    > For the reverse path, where the handset is transmitting,
    > symmetry applies, making it work in both directions.
    >
    > Better results can occur where the "outside" antenna is a directional
    > array, which intercepts relatively more power from the cell site,
    > and also concentrates the power from the handset for the reverse path.
    >
    > Depending on the indoor geometry, some directivity can be useful there, =
    > too.
    >
    > There are some tricky antenna-design and matching problems involved.
    > Don't expect perfect results if you try to cobble this together on your =
    > own.
    > ---JRC---
    >
    > "Bozo The Clown" <anotherbozotheclown@yahoo.com> wrote in message =
    > news:vmcd6jpf9sn58a@corp.supernews.com...
    > > I've never used one, but I seriously don't understand how a "passive
    > > repeater" could work. I don't understand how a piece of metal =

    > outside
    > > the room could increase the signal inside the room without either a
    > > direct physical connection to the phone, or power amplification.
    > >=20

    >


    [posted via phonescoop.com]
  12. Certainly, a direct connection would be better, but confining.

    The passive repeater scheme wouldn't be useful unless your indoor
    signal is very substantially worse than your outdoor signal,
    or if you're able to use a very directive array outdoors.
    ---JRC---

    "Bozo The Clown" <anotherbozotheclown@yahoo.com> wrote in message =
    news:vmetcpaechcia8@corp.supernews.com...
    > I see what you're saying, I'm just wondering if they're be enough =

    signal
    > for to work in practice. With a big enough antenna outside I suppose
    > anything is possible, but I'm guessing most of the passive repeaters =

    are
    > small stub antennas with very little gain.
    >=20
    > I'd have to imagine a direct connection to the phone would be =

    infinitely
    > better though.
    >=20
  13. "John R. Copeland" <jcopelan@columbus.rr.com> wrote in article
    <iaP9b.3072$KJ5.2855@fe2.columbus.rr.com>:
    > > The passive repeater scheme wouldn't be useful unless your indoor

    > signal is very substantially worse than your outdoor signal,
    > or if you're able to use a very directive array outdoors.
    > ---JRC---


    Agreed.


    [posted via phonescoop.com]

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