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roaming

Discussion in 'alt.cellular.verizon' started by Peter Vasyutin 450951544, Dec 9, 2003.

  1. David S

    David S Guest

    On Wed, 10 Dec 2003 00:24:46 GMT, "Peter Vasyutin 450951544"
    <vasyutin@comcast.net> chose to add this to the great equation of life, the
    universe, and everything:

    >Hi!
    >
    >I bought my prepaid cell phone in San Francisco and I was pretty glad to use
    >it. But yesterday I was in LA and every time I made a call I had to hear at
    >first "Please, enter destination area code and phone number now!" After that
    >I had to open my old notebook, thumb through it, find a number and enter it.
    >How can Verizon call it "service"? How to avoid those troubles? Switch to
    >AT&T? :)


    Let me see if I have this straight: your phone's area code is San Francisco
    and when you're in S.F., you make calls by dialing 7 digits. When you
    travel to L.A., are you trying to call back to S.F. or to L.A. numbers?
    Either way, it is usual in this situation to dial the area code before the
    7-digit number; on some systems, you may have to put a "1" before the area
    code. Some phones have a special feature to let you "prepend" an area code
    (or whatever) to numbers stored in the phone's address book.

    The way I work around this is to just store every number in my address book
    with its area code. They all work just fine that way, even when I'm home,
    and in a metropolitan area where I can be in any of 8 area codes besides my
    own in under an hour, it makes life a lot easier. (In fact, in an hour I
    can travel through 2 area codes and end up in 3 different 3rd ones, one of
    which is actually a 2-code overlay area.)

    [If anyone cares... I live in 630 (mid-far west suburbs of Chicago). In an
    hour, I can go through 708 (south and near west suburbs) to 219 (northwest
    Indiana). Taking a different route, I can go through 708 and 773 (most of
    the city of Chicago) to 219. Or, I can go through 708 and 773 and end up in
    312 (downtown Chicago plus Chicago city offices wherever they are (which
    makes for some really interesting programming in the various switches
    around the city)). If I'm going to a Cubs game or my father's apartment, I
    would go into 312, then turn north back into 773 again. (He used to work
    for the city, so if I went to see him at his office, I would go
    630-708-773-312-773, then call a 312 number while sitting in the office
    parking lot in the middle of 773.) Or I can go through 708 to the 847/xxx
    overlay area (north suburbs, I forget what the other area code is). It
    would usually be out of my way, but I could go from 708 into 773 to get to
    847/xxx as well. Going west or south from home, I can be in 815 in under
    half an hour, and several more area codes are within 2 hours.]

    See my current eBay auction:
    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=1560&item=2578805629
    --
    David Streeter, "an internet god" -- Dave Barry
    http://home.att.net/~dwstreeter
    Expect a train on ANY track at ANY time.
    "When I was in prison, I was wrapped up in all those deep books. That
    Tolstoy crap. People shouldn't read that stuff." - Mike Tyson (who gave up
    Tolstoy for comic books)



    › See More: roaming
  2. Bill Radio

    Bill Radio Guest

    I too was very surprised that Akron/Canton needed yet another area code
    after splitting off 330, and Cleveland didn't. Admittedly, the suburbs did
    split into 440. My guess is that it had to do with having to assign a
    certain number of prefixes to competing non-incumbent telcos, like AT&T,
    Sprint, etc.

    Since the telecom shakeout, many of these companies no longer exist,
    reducing the need for many extra exchanges, and a second area code. When
    the market was hot, certain neighborhoods, like Montrose, had to go to 234
    to find available exchanges. Since then, there's plenty of 330's to go
    around.

    Those of you still dialing only 7 numbers are indeed a rare breed.
    Fortunately, all cellular carriers accept 10 digits which once entered into
    your phone book becomes a non-issue. And when I'm roaming (on AT&T/CallPlus
    Pre-paid) I also need to re-enter the number called, so I have the first
    string programmed into a memory. It can be any number. Then when prompted,
    I can enter the 10-digit number as normal. You get used to it.

    Bill Radio
    Click for Western U.S. Wireless Reviews at:
    http://www.mountainwireless.com



    "Mike" <inundated9@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:u19ftvc01g3t3su29d6erb6ks6p51n5brn@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 10 Dec 2003 11:28:56 -0600, Steven J Sobol
    > <sjsobol@JustThe.net> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >(Have any areacode 234 numbers even been assigned yet?!)

    >
    > Yep, though not many of 'em. The Beacon Journal had an article on the
    > FedEx operations by Akron/Canton Regional Airport...they got a bunch
    > of 234 numbers a while back. But, since most customer contact with
    > FedEx is via the company's 800 numbers, most people won't notice it.
    >
  3. Bill Radio <br@mountainwirelessnospan.com> wrote:
    > I too was very surprised that Akron/Canton needed yet another area code
    > after splitting off 330, and Cleveland didn't. Admittedly, the suburbs did
    > split into 440. My guess is that it had to do with having to assign a
    > certain number of prefixes to competing non-incumbent telcos, like AT&T,
    > Sprint, etc.


    440 is due for an overlay soon, I believe.

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services
    22674 Motnocab Road * Apple Valley, CA 92307-1950
    Steve Sobol, Proprietor
    888.480.4NET (4638) * 248.724.4NET * sjsobol@JustThe.net
  4. Justin

    Justin Guest

    Bill Radio wrote on [Thu, 11 Dec 2003 00:17:24 -0700]:
    > Those of you still dialing only 7 numbers are indeed a rare breed.


    Of course, this thread is really the first time I've heard that people
    are being forced to dial 10 digits for local calls
  5. Mike

    Mike Guest

    On Thu, 11 Dec 2003 00:17:24 -0700, "Bill Radio"
    <br@MountainWirelessNOSPAN.com> wrote:

    >Since the telecom shakeout, many of these companies no longer exist,
    >reducing the need for many extra exchanges, and a second area code. When
    >the market was hot, certain neighborhoods, like Montrose, had to go to 234
    >to find available exchanges. Since then, there's plenty of 330's to go
    >around.


    I've been living in the Montrose area of Summit County for the past
    few months, and I don't know of anyone who's gotten a 234 area code.
    Maybe some major commercial customers...but residential folks are
    still 330 as far as I know. Again, as you stated, the demand has been
    reduced due to the shakeout.

    >Those of you still dialing only 7 numbers are indeed a rare breed.
    >Fortunately, all cellular carriers accept 10 digits which once entered into
    >your phone book becomes a non-issue. And when I'm roaming (on AT&T/CallPlus
    >Pre-paid) I also need to re-enter the number called, so I have the first
    >string programmed into a memory. It can be any number. Then when prompted,
    >I can enter the 10-digit number as normal. You get used to it.


    When I have roamed on VZW prepaid, and had to do this, I just dialed
    *anything* for the first prompt...I think it even works if you dial
    one number.

    Mike
  6. "David S" <dwstreeter@att.net> wrote in message
    news:340gtv4gldh3ennk9t18d9f3g9gnh6ea9g@4ax.com...

    > When you
    > travel to L.A., are you trying to call back to S.F. or to L.A. numbers?


    Both of them.

    > Either way, it is usual in this situation to dial the area code before the
    > 7-digit number; on some systems, you may have to put a "1" before the area
    > code.


    I have tried all of the combinations :). Actually, I have the numbers in my
    phone stored as "1-area-number". I could dial anything (1..11 digits) to
    hear "enter the area code blah-blah-blah". I tried at that moment just
    select the same number from the phone book. The phone allowed to do it. But
    it just hung up the active call and made another one when I pressed "Ok".

    Peter
  7. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <340gtv4gldh3ennk9t18d9f3g9gnh6ea9g@4ax.com>,
    David S <dwstreeter@att.net> wrote:
    >Let me see if I have this straight: your phone's area code is San Francisco
    >and when you're in S.F., you make calls by dialing 7 digits. When you
    >travel to L.A., are you trying to call back to S.F. or to L.A. numbers?
    >Either way, it is usual in this situation to dial the area code before the
    >7-digit number; on some systems, you may have to put a "1" before the area
    >code. Some phones have a special feature to let you "prepend" an area code
    >(or whatever) to numbers stored in the phone's address book.


    For me, 7-digit dialing worked only in my home area (SF). SF and LA are
    different VZW systems, so I would have to use 10 digits if my
    phone number was in one area and I was in the other.
  8. Justin <nospam@insightbb.com> wrote:
    > Bill Radio wrote on [Thu, 11 Dec 2003 00:17:24 -0700]:
    >> Those of you still dialing only 7 numbers are indeed a rare breed.

    >
    > Of course, this thread is really the first time I've heard that people
    > are being forced to dial 10 digits for local calls


    It's the case in any area that has an overlay, in other words two
    or more area codes serving the exact same area.

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services
    22674 Motnocab Road * Apple Valley, CA 92307-1950
    Steve Sobol, Proprietor
    888.480.4NET (4638) * 248.724.4NET * sjsobol@JustThe.net
  9. Justin

    Justin Guest

    Steven J Sobol wrote on [Thu, 11 Dec 2003 12:57:52 -0600]:
    > Justin <nospam@insightbb.com> wrote:
    >> Bill Radio wrote on [Thu, 11 Dec 2003 00:17:24 -0700]:
    >>> Those of you still dialing only 7 numbers are indeed a rare breed.

    >>
    >> Of course, this thread is really the first time I've heard that people
    >> are being forced to dial 10 digits for local calls

    >
    > It's the case in any area that has an overlay, in other words two
    > or more area codes serving the exact same area.


    right. But being forced to dial the area code for your neighbour who has
    the same area code as you?
  10. Peter Pan

    Peter Pan Guest

    "Justin" <nospam@insightbb.com> wrote in message
    news:slrnbti31j.1jf.nospam@jbell.dns2go.com...
    > Steven J Sobol wrote on [Thu, 11 Dec 2003 12:57:52 -0600]:
    > > Justin <nospam@insightbb.com> wrote:
    > >> Bill Radio wrote on [Thu, 11 Dec 2003 00:17:24 -0700]:
    > >>> Those of you still dialing only 7 numbers are indeed a rare breed.
    > >>
    > >> Of course, this thread is really the first time I've heard that people
    > >> are being forced to dial 10 digits for local calls

    > >
    > > It's the case in any area that has an overlay, in other words two
    > > or more area codes serving the exact same area.

    >
    > right. But being forced to dial the area code for your neighbour who has
    > the same area code as you?
    >


    In some areas of the country that's EXACTLY what you have to do, and forget
    neighbors, when I was in Baltimore my sister had two lines in her house,
    (her room was on the top floor) for us to talk, in the same house on her two
    phone lines, we had to do the 10 digit dialing dance!
  11. On Thu, 11 Dec 2003 16:09:18 GMT, Justin <nospam@insightbb.com> wrote:

    >Bill Radio wrote on [Thu, 11 Dec 2003 00:17:24 -0700]:
    >> Those of you still dialing only 7 numbers are indeed a rare breed.

    >
    >Of course, this thread is really the first time I've heard that people
    >are being forced to dial 10 digits for local calls


    Depends on your area. If your area has overlays over the original
    area code you most likely need to dial 10 or 11 digits.



    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    To send an email reply send to
    GSMthemobilestandard (@) yahoo.com
  12. On Fri, 12 Dec 2003 00:30:43 GMT, Justin <nospam@insightbb.com> wrote:

    >Steven J Sobol wrote on [Thu, 11 Dec 2003 12:57:52 -0600]:
    >> Justin <nospam@insightbb.com> wrote:
    >>> Bill Radio wrote on [Thu, 11 Dec 2003 00:17:24 -0700]:
    >>>> Those of you still dialing only 7 numbers are indeed a rare breed.
    >>>
    >>> Of course, this thread is really the first time I've heard that people
    >>> are being forced to dial 10 digits for local calls

    >>
    >> It's the case in any area that has an overlay, in other words two
    >> or more area codes serving the exact same area.

    >
    >right. But being forced to dial the area code for your neighbour who has
    >the same area code as you?


    That's the reality in areas with an overlay.

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    To send an email reply send to
    GSMthemobilestandard (@) yahoo.com
  13. Blerg

    Blerg Guest

    x-no-archive:yes
    >From: Group Special Mobile look@signature_to.reply :


    "... But being forced to dial the area code for your neighbour who has the same
    area code as you? That's the reality in areas with an overlay"

    In many areas, like in NJ, it has been a few years now that you must dial a
    10 digit # to complete the call, even if calling your house's 2nd line w/the
    same area code.
    You can dial 10 or digits for same area code, 11 (1+Area code) for others...
  14. David

    David Guest

    In article <20031212115337.16110.00000547@mb-m22.aol.com>,
    dirtmeat@aol.com.bex (Blerg) wrote:

    > x-no-archive:yes
    > >From: Group Special Mobile look@signature_to.reply :

    >
    > "... But being forced to dial the area code for your neighbour who has the
    > same
    > area code as you? That's the reality in areas with an overlay"
    >
    > In many areas, like in NJ, it has been a few years now that you must dial a
    > 10 digit # to complete the call, even if calling your house's 2nd line w/the
    > same area code.
    > You can dial 10 or digits for same area code, 11 (1+Area code) for
    > others...



    Most all cell phones have speed dialing, and Radio Shack has sold cheap
    home corded phones with speed dialing for over 20 years.
  15. Justin <nospam@insightbb.com> wrote:

    > right. But being forced to dial the area code for your neighbour who has
    > the same area code as you?


    I'm in Akron. I dial 375-1234, for example. (375 is an actual SBC phone
    exchange in downtown Akron.) How does the telephone company's switch know
    whether it's 330 or 234? Prior to the overlay, it was guaranteed to be 330
    but now it isn't.

    *That* is why ten-digit dialing is required in areas with overlays. It
    doesn't mean the call is billed as a local toll or long-distance call, btw.

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services
    22674 Motnocab Road * Apple Valley, CA 92307-1950
    Steve Sobol, Proprietor
    888.480.4NET (4638) * 248.724.4NET * sjsobol@JustThe.net
  16. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <d72dnVhp1aXxlUeiRVn-jw@lmi.net>,
    Steven J Sobol <sjsobol@JustThe.net> wrote:
    >Justin <nospam@insightbb.com> wrote:
    >
    >> right. But being forced to dial the area code for your neighbour who has
    >> the same area code as you?

    >
    >I'm in Akron. I dial 375-1234, for example. (375 is an actual SBC phone
    >exchange in downtown Akron.) How does the telephone company's switch know
    >whether it's 330 or 234? Prior to the overlay, it was guaranteed to be 330
    >but now it isn't.
    >
    >*That* is why ten-digit dialing is required in areas with overlays. It
    >doesn't mean the call is billed as a local toll or long-distance call, btw.


    On a cell phone, one choice is to assume the area code of the calling
    phone's number, if seven digits are dialed. That's how VZW works in
    the SF Bay area. If I dial a seven digit number on my 408-based (San Jose)
    VZW phone while I am in San Fransisco (415), I get a 408 number. Couldn't
    landline phones do the same thing?
  17. CharlesH <hoch@exemplary.invalid> wrote:
    >
    >>*That* is why ten-digit dialing is required in areas with overlays. It
    >>doesn't mean the call is billed as a local toll or long-distance call, btw.

    >
    > On a cell phone, one choice is to assume the area code of the calling
    > phone's number, if seven digits are dialed. That's how VZW works in
    > the SF Bay area. If I dial a seven digit number on my 408-based (San Jose)
    > VZW phone while I am in San Fransisco (415), I get a 408 number. Couldn't
    > landline phones do the same thing?


    Yeah, probably, but when's the last time you ever saw a landline telco
    actually make things easy for their customers? ;)

    I don't know if there is any esoterica in the way LATAs and rate centers
    work that would require it, or if maybe the billing systems the LECs use
    require it. Maybe there is a good reason for it; maybe not. Some of my
    friends are telco gurus, but I don't pretend to be.

    Personally, I only program ten-digit numbers into my phone's memory, and
    I generally use ten digits when dialing a number anyhow (since I dial a lot
    of long-distance numbers from my cell). So it doesn't bother me. In fact,
    when giving one of my phone numbers to someone locally, I'll often include
    the area code out of habit, even though there is no overlay in this part of
    California and everyone knows the area code is 760.

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services
    22674 Motnocab Road * Apple Valley, CA 92307-1950
    Steve Sobol, Proprietor
    888.480.4NET (4638) * 248.724.4NET * sjsobol@JustThe.net
  18. Peter Vasyutin 450951544 <vasyutin@comcast.net> wrote:

    > Be sure the telephone company knows *your* number while you are calling. So
    > it would be logically to handle all the 7-digit number as the numbers of
    > *your* local area. Why should you know about all this "areas with overlays",
    > etc? You are not running the telecom business, you are just getting the
    > service, aren't you? And you should expect the best service to get your
    > money's worth. Why to advocate the inconvenience and continue to dial 10, 11
    > digits to get in touch with the second line in your own home?


    I don't understand why you think I'm advocating it, although quite frankly,
    I think people who are complaining about it who don't have to re-program
    anything more than a few speed dial numbers are whining. People who have to
    do reprogramming of PBX's and similar systems have a more legitimate complaint,
    since there is more work involved (generally the people doing the
    reprogramming are going to be telecommunications resellers who have to
    reprogram lots of customers). For others who just have a few phone lines and
    no systems to reprogram, in my opinion, it isn't a big deal (and FYI, I was
    working in Akron when the overlay went into effect and yes, I had to dial
    ten digits too).

    But I'll say the same thing to you I just said to Charles Hoch. Yes, what
    you describe is *completely* logical, and yes, I think the telephone
    companies *should* do it. But having had nightmares in dealing with big
    phone companies, both as an end-user and as someone who used to support
    dial-up Internet service for a local ISP, I can tell you they won't. They
    *will not lift a finger for anyone unless they are forced to.*

    Advocating? No. Just telling it like it is. I hate phone companies; they all
    suck donkey genitals. Some just suck less (and not by much).

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services
    22674 Motnocab Road * Apple Valley, CA 92307-1950
    Steve Sobol, Proprietor
    888.480.4NET (4638) * 248.724.4NET * sjsobol@JustThe.net
  19. Blerg

    Blerg Guest

    x-no-archive:yes From: hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH):
    "..On a cell phone, one choice is to assume the area code of the calling
    phone's number, if seven digits are dialed. That's how VZW works in
    the SF Bay area. If I dial a seven digit number on my 408-based (San Jose)
    VZW phone while I am in San Fransisco (415), I get a 408 number. Couldn't
    landline phones do the same thing? .."

    Actually more confusing in overlay areas. Once lots of homes & businesses
    have mixed area codes in the same area, people naturally & regularly start
    dialing 10 digits anyway, & no one is going to give you their number as a 7
    digit anyway. It actually becomes harder to "remember" to only dial 7 digits
    for this #, vs. 10 for most others.
    .. Also, just as when "1" was added as a prefix before an area code, The phone
    company system is "waiting" for the correct amount of digits to complete the
    call, If you could dial either 7 or 10 in overlay areas, lots of people would
    be getting wrong numbers if they hesitate or whatever.....
    Being in an overlay area, it actually isn't the problem others may think.
    Everyone in the country has a 10 digit phone number, & that's that. Nice &
    simple. 1 rule fits all.
    ....Reminds me of when they first changed the look of the $20 bill a few
    years ago. Loads of people were complaining, making "monopoly money" & "It
    sucks" comments, & then 6 months later it's business as usual & no one is
    bothered.....
  20. David

    David Guest

    In article <20031212162421.21755.00000481@mb-m26.aol.com>,
    dirtmeat@aol.com.bex (Blerg) wrote:

    > Actually more confusing in overlay areas. Once lots of homes & businesses
    > have mixed area codes in the same area, people naturally & regularly start
    > dialing 10 digits anyway, & no one is going to give you their number as a 7
    > digit anyway. It actually becomes harder to "remember" to only dial 7 digits
    > for this #, vs. 10 for most others.




    Another possible reason to choose one carrier over another. In places
    with ovrlays of 3 or 4 or more area codes, different carriers may be
    saddled with a subset of area codes, and you couldn't get your preferred
    one. i.e. (212) in New York City is very valuable

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