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Sometimes...The Phone Matters

Discussion in 'alt.cellular.verizon' started by Mike, Nov 26, 2003.

  1. Mark Allread

    Mark Allread Guest

    On Sat, 29 Nov 2003 19:35:29 GMT, AL <al145 @ delete.hotmail.com> wrote:

    > So if your provider uses the same type antenna in testing, then it will
    > show
    > excellent coverage, but will not be true and accurate for the 80% that
    > use
    > their phones in a conventional way, no external antenna...


    Hardly "conventional," but then it's YOUR choice not to have good
    reception, so quityerbitchen. I bet you'd complain about lack of
    service inside a Faraday cage, too.

    --
    Mark



    › See More: Sometimes...The Phone Matters
  2. Isaiah Beard

    Isaiah Beard Guest

    N9WOS wrote:


    > Remember that cdma coverage shrinks during high usage.
    > That is why some people have coverage that disappears
    > at there home depending on the time of day, and other factors.


    Yes, but the phone also has something to do with it. I've seen
    situations where phones from different manufacturers will be in the same
    place, locked onto the same tower (as verified by the service or debug
    screens) and get different signal strengths from the same tower. It's
    all a matter of how well designed the phone is to maximize RF reception,
    whether the manufacturer chose style over function, and whether they
    decided to cut some corners and go with a cheaper or older chipset. The
    age of the phone is also important. Newer CDMA chipsets take advantage
    of better RF front-end designs than the older ones.


    > That 1 to 2 bar signal may become totally unusable during rush hour.
    > Only people with 3 or more bars of signal may be able to use the phone.


    I would venture to say that nowadays, most wireless carriers are
    limiting the number of conversations on cell towers to minimize the
    effect of cell breathing. With 1x, you can do that now, because the
    capacity can be effectively doubled, minimizing the effect. If you
    limit the number of trunks the cell site has access to, you'll get a
    network busy before the cell breathes appreciably.




    --
    E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.
  3. In article <3fca1527$1@rutgers.edu>,
    Isaiah Beard <sacredpoet@sacredpoet.com> wrote:

    > > That 1 to 2 bar signal may become totally unusable during rush hour.
    > > Only people with 3 or more bars of signal may be able to use the phone.

    >
    > I would venture to say that nowadays, most wireless carriers are
    > limiting the number of conversations on cell towers to minimize the
    > effect of cell breathing.



    I have seen that the number of bars as indication of signal strength is
    meaningless for many phones now. Apparently the cellular carriers prefer
    to receive fewer support calls about weak phone signal, so with any
    signal at all, it will show full strength on somne phones.
  4. Isaiah Beard

    Isaiah Beard Guest

    N9WOS wrote:

    >>question.

    >
    >
    > ow....Second question.
    >
    > What is the last digit of your phone number?
    > That will be what your "access overload class"
    > will be set to on your phone.


    Uh, no... for starters Access Overload Class is largely unused and
    ignored by cell carriers. Even the proposed WPS (Wireless Priority
    Service) that will supposedly allow priority calls from authorized
    government officials and disaster recovery personnel won't use AOC. It
    will instead rely on an account flag authorizing its use, AND the use of
    a * code (*272 I believe) to activate it - which of course will only
    work if your account has been flagged.

    See: http://wps.ncs.gov/ for info.

    And secondly, even if the carriers did use AOC, it's not endemic to what
    your phone number is. It's a flag set both on your account and in a
    seperate bit in the phone's setup parameters.



    --
    E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.
  5. N9WOS

    N9WOS Guest

    > > That 1 to 2 bar signal may become totally unusable during rush hour.
    > > Only people with 3 or more bars of signal may be able to use the phone.

    >
    > I would venture to say that nowadays, most wireless carriers are
    > limiting the number of conversations on cell towers to minimize the
    > effect of cell breathing. With 1x, you can do that now, because the
    > capacity can be effectively doubled, minimizing the effect. If you
    > limit the number of trunks the cell site has access to, you'll get a
    > network busy before the cell breathes appreciably.


    Not to be rude...... but........
    What is the point in CDMA when you have to limit
    it's max capacity below any meaningful level?

    The only time CDMA shows higher capacity than
    the other technologies is when it's operating at near
    full capacity on all cells.
    And, at that condition, soft handoffs can't happen.
    And cell breathing is definitely noticeable.

    At the user level that CDMA breathing is manageable,
    GSM and half rate TDMA would kick it's ass in call volume.
    And There would be ZERO breathing.

    And the only time breathing isn't noticeable, is when you
    don't live on the edge of the coverage area.

    None appreciable breathing will make the difference between
    useable coverage at night, and no coverage in the day at
    someone's house.

    That is a feature that I find fundamentally wrong with
    CDMA as a cellular communications standard.
  6. David L

    David L Guest

    Isaiah Beard <sacredpoet@sacredpoet.com> wrote in message news:<3fca1527$1@rutgers.edu>...
    >
    > Yes, but the phone also has something to do with it. I've seen
    > situations where phones from different manufacturers will be in the same
    > place, locked onto the same tower (as verified by the service or debug
    > screens) and get different signal strengths from the same tower. It's
    > all a matter of how well designed the phone is to maximize RF reception,
    > whether the manufacturer chose style over function, and whether they
    > decided to cut some corners and go with a cheaper or older chipset. The
    > age of the phone is also important. Newer CDMA chipsets take advantage
    > of better RF front-end designs than the older ones.
    >
    >
    > > That 1 to 2 bar signal may become totally unusable during rush hour.
    > > Only people with 3 or more bars of signal may be able to use the phone.

    >
    > I would venture to say that nowadays, most wireless carriers are
    > limiting the number of conversations on cell towers to minimize the
    > effect of cell breathing. With 1x, you can do that now, because the
    > capacity can be effectively doubled, minimizing the effect. If you
    > limit the number of trunks the cell site has access to, you'll get a
    > network busy before the cell breathes appreciably.


    Please help with burning question!
    I'm certain 1x is used for EN high speed data and certain handsets,
    like the LG 4400 are using 1x for GIN. Is there any proof, article,
    debug screen, inside info, or any way to tell for certain, 1x is
    currently used for voice in my area? Last Verizon insider indicated 1x
    was data only in SF area. I know 1x can be used for voice, but the
    mere detection of 1x on a screen does not mean it's being used. I also
    have a 1x capable Audiovox 9500, never have seen the 1x displayed,
    except on the package.

    Thanks,
    David
  7. David L

    David L Guest

    Isaiah Beard <sacredpoet@sacredpoet.com> wrote in message news:<3fca176f$1@rutgers.edu>...
    > N9WOS wrote:
    >
    > >>question.

    > >
    > >
    > > ow....Second question.
    > >
    > > What is the last digit of your phone number?
    > > That will be what your "access overload class"
    > > will be set to on your phone.

    >
    > Uh, no... for starters Access Overload Class is largely unused and
    > ignored by cell carriers. Even the proposed WPS (Wireless Priority
    > Service) that will supposedly allow priority calls from authorized
    > government officials and disaster recovery personnel won't use AOC. It
    > will instead rely on an account flag authorizing its use, AND the use of
    > a * code (*272 I believe) to activate it - which of course will only
    > work if your account has been flagged.
    >
    > See: http://wps.ncs.gov/ for info.
    >
    > And secondly, even if the carriers did use AOC, it's not endemic to what
    > your phone number is. It's a flag set both on your account and in a
    > seperate bit in the phone's setup parameters.


    Thanks for the correct info. I new Overload Class was no longer used,
    excpet maybe like a random rotating outage block. I do remember
    requesting a priority acccess a few years ago and GTE Mobilnet said
    they offered this service to military personnel. Not worth the calling
    priority! If someone were already in the military, that's one small
    compensation they should receive.

    -
    David
  8. Mark Allread

    Mark Allread Guest

    On Sun, 30 Nov 2003 17:46:18 GMT, N9WOS <n9wos@nobug.worldnet.att.net>
    wrote:


    > At the user level that CDMA breathing is manageable,
    > GSM and half rate TDMA would kick it's ass in call volume.
    > And There would be ZERO breathing.


    And under any and all conditions, GSM can't provide service to
    anyone over 22 miles away. With a CDMA phone, one can (whether
    legall or not) increase range with an antenna.

    --
    Mark
  9. Mike

    Mike Guest

    On 30 Nov 2003 23:49:47 -0800, davidlind@my-deja.com (David L) wrote:

    >I know 1x can be used for voice, but the
    >mere detection of 1x on a screen does not mean it's being used. I also
    >have a 1x capable Audiovox 9500, never have seen the 1x displayed,
    >except on the package.


    I could be wrong on this, but I believe VZW is sending voice over 1X
    whenever it's present in the signal. It's to their advantage to do
    so...they can squeeze in a lot more calls that way!

    One thing I've noticed...making calls on a 1X signal in a local rural
    area... the call quality is a LOT better with a low signal (1-2 bars
    on the phone, LG VX4400) than I've seen with non-1X low digital
    signals. No "warbling" that you'd typically get on non-1X low signal
    calls.

    Mike
  10. Mike <inundated9@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > On 30 Nov 2003 23:49:47 -0800, davidlind@my-deja.com (David L) wrote:
    >
    >>I know 1x can be used for voice, but the
    >>mere detection of 1x on a screen does not mean it's being used. I also
    >>have a 1x capable Audiovox 9500, never have seen the 1x displayed,
    >>except on the package.

    >
    > I could be wrong on this, but I believe VZW is sending voice over 1X
    > whenever it's present in the signal. It's to their advantage to do
    > so...they can squeeze in a lot more calls that way!


    I think there's a 1x indicator on my 2325 too, and I've never seen it lit.
    I've used the phone in Cleveland and here in the Apple Valley area. I've used
    1x in both places.

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services
    22674 Motnocab Road * Apple Valley, CA 92307-1950
    Steve Sobol, Proprietor
    888.480.4NET (4638) * 248.724.4NET * sjsobol@JustThe.net
  11. Mike

    Mike Guest

    On Mon, 01 Dec 2003 12:07:06 -0600, Steven J Sobol
    <sjsobol@JustThe.net> wrote:

    >I think there's a 1x indicator on my 2325 too, and I've never seen it lit.
    >I've used the phone in Cleveland and here in the Apple Valley area. I've used
    >1x in both places.


    This may vary by phone. If there's a 1x digital signal available, my
    LG VX4400 WILL display "1x" on the banner, no matter if I'm using data
    or not. And as you know, I'm on VZW's Cleveland/Akron network (SID
    21)

    Mike

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