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Switching to Sprint? Opinions?

Discussion in 'alt.cellular.verizon' started by Michael L., Jun 7, 2004.

  1. On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 18:37:48 -0700, "Michael L."
    <FIGHTALLSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >My Verizon contract is up, and I went to Radio Shack today to compare
    >phones. I'm very happy with Verizon, except, and this is important, I
    >can only get a Verizon signal in one room of my house, and even that is
    >a bit spotty. My daughter tells me that one of her friends has Sprint,
    >and she gets reception everywhere in my house. My daughter also can't
    >get Verizon reception in her dorm room back in Massachusets, and she
    >says her friends with Sprint phones can.


    I have the opposite experience, although I can receive a signal in my
    home, I cannot receive a signal in my son's home (or within a mile of
    his home, just outside Downtown Disney in Orlando). I also cannot
    receive a signal in many areas of my home calling area in
    Jacksonville, FL. In the case of one client, I was standing outside
    in their parking lot, immediately next to I95 in the middle of
    Jacksonville, and could not get a signal, other than roaming.

    >The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >everywhere in the US.


    And, roaming is the key word. I travel across the country, and
    frequently wind up with roaming vs. PCS network in cities where you
    would expect to have good PCS coverage. I have had to "add on" a
    feature, with extra monthly charges, to get "free roaming".

    >I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >signal that my Verizon phone would? I understand that, all other things
    >being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.


    Anytime you drop off the PCS network to an analogue signal, you are
    roaming, and roaming charges (in my case, 41 cents a minute) apply.

    >I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >changed?


    I do not have a good opinion of Sprint. Every time I see their ads
    where they talk about "nationwide coverage with no roaming" it just
    infuriates me.

    I am changing at the end of this billing cycle.


    Deb
     



    › See More: Switching to Sprint? Opinions?
  2. On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 18:37:48 -0700, "Michael L."
    <FIGHTALLSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >My Verizon contract is up, and I went to Radio Shack today to compare
    >phones. I'm very happy with Verizon, except, and this is important, I
    >can only get a Verizon signal in one room of my house, and even that is
    >a bit spotty. My daughter tells me that one of her friends has Sprint,
    >and she gets reception everywhere in my house. My daughter also can't
    >get Verizon reception in her dorm room back in Massachusets, and she
    >says her friends with Sprint phones can.


    I have the opposite experience, although I can receive a signal in my
    home, I cannot receive a signal in my son's home (or within a mile of
    his home, just outside Downtown Disney in Orlando). I also cannot
    receive a signal in many areas of my home calling area in
    Jacksonville, FL. In the case of one client, I was standing outside
    in their parking lot, immediately next to I95 in the middle of
    Jacksonville, and could not get a signal, other than roaming.

    >The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >everywhere in the US.


    And, roaming is the key word. I travel across the country, and
    frequently wind up with roaming vs. PCS network in cities where you
    would expect to have good PCS coverage. I have had to "add on" a
    feature, with extra monthly charges, to get "free roaming".

    >I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >signal that my Verizon phone would? I understand that, all other things
    >being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.


    Anytime you drop off the PCS network to an analogue signal, you are
    roaming, and roaming charges (in my case, 41 cents a minute) apply.

    >I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >changed?


    I do not have a good opinion of Sprint. Every time I see their ads
    where they talk about "nationwide coverage with no roaming" it just
    infuriates me.

    I am changing at the end of this billing cycle.


    Deb
     
  3. On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 18:37:48 -0700, "Michael L."
    <FIGHTALLSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >My Verizon contract is up, and I went to Radio Shack today to compare
    >phones. I'm very happy with Verizon, except, and this is important, I
    >can only get a Verizon signal in one room of my house, and even that is
    >a bit spotty. My daughter tells me that one of her friends has Sprint,
    >and she gets reception everywhere in my house. My daughter also can't
    >get Verizon reception in her dorm room back in Massachusets, and she
    >says her friends with Sprint phones can.


    I have the opposite experience, although I can receive a signal in my
    home, I cannot receive a signal in my son's home (or within a mile of
    his home, just outside Downtown Disney in Orlando). I also cannot
    receive a signal in many areas of my home calling area in
    Jacksonville, FL. In the case of one client, I was standing outside
    in their parking lot, immediately next to I95 in the middle of
    Jacksonville, and could not get a signal, other than roaming.

    >The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >everywhere in the US.


    And, roaming is the key word. I travel across the country, and
    frequently wind up with roaming vs. PCS network in cities where you
    would expect to have good PCS coverage. I have had to "add on" a
    feature, with extra monthly charges, to get "free roaming".

    >I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >signal that my Verizon phone would? I understand that, all other things
    >being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.


    Anytime you drop off the PCS network to an analogue signal, you are
    roaming, and roaming charges (in my case, 41 cents a minute) apply.

    >I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >changed?


    I do not have a good opinion of Sprint. Every time I see their ads
    where they talk about "nationwide coverage with no roaming" it just
    infuriates me.

    I am changing at the end of this billing cycle.


    Deb
     
  4. On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 18:37:48 -0700, "Michael L."
    <FIGHTALLSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >My Verizon contract is up, and I went to Radio Shack today to compare
    >phones. I'm very happy with Verizon, except, and this is important, I
    >can only get a Verizon signal in one room of my house, and even that is
    >a bit spotty. My daughter tells me that one of her friends has Sprint,
    >and she gets reception everywhere in my house. My daughter also can't
    >get Verizon reception in her dorm room back in Massachusets, and she
    >says her friends with Sprint phones can.


    I have the opposite experience, although I can receive a signal in my
    home, I cannot receive a signal in my son's home (or within a mile of
    his home, just outside Downtown Disney in Orlando). I also cannot
    receive a signal in many areas of my home calling area in
    Jacksonville, FL. In the case of one client, I was standing outside
    in their parking lot, immediately next to I95 in the middle of
    Jacksonville, and could not get a signal, other than roaming.

    >The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >everywhere in the US.


    And, roaming is the key word. I travel across the country, and
    frequently wind up with roaming vs. PCS network in cities where you
    would expect to have good PCS coverage. I have had to "add on" a
    feature, with extra monthly charges, to get "free roaming".

    >I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >signal that my Verizon phone would? I understand that, all other things
    >being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.


    Anytime you drop off the PCS network to an analogue signal, you are
    roaming, and roaming charges (in my case, 41 cents a minute) apply.

    >I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >changed?


    I do not have a good opinion of Sprint. Every time I see their ads
    where they talk about "nationwide coverage with no roaming" it just
    infuriates me.

    I am changing at the end of this billing cycle.


    Deb
     
  5. On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 18:37:48 -0700, "Michael L."
    <FIGHTALLSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >My Verizon contract is up, and I went to Radio Shack today to compare
    >phones. I'm very happy with Verizon, except, and this is important, I
    >can only get a Verizon signal in one room of my house, and even that is
    >a bit spotty. My daughter tells me that one of her friends has Sprint,
    >and she gets reception everywhere in my house. My daughter also can't
    >get Verizon reception in her dorm room back in Massachusets, and she
    >says her friends with Sprint phones can.


    I have the opposite experience, although I can receive a signal in my
    home, I cannot receive a signal in my son's home (or within a mile of
    his home, just outside Downtown Disney in Orlando). I also cannot
    receive a signal in many areas of my home calling area in
    Jacksonville, FL. In the case of one client, I was standing outside
    in their parking lot, immediately next to I95 in the middle of
    Jacksonville, and could not get a signal, other than roaming.

    >The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >everywhere in the US.


    And, roaming is the key word. I travel across the country, and
    frequently wind up with roaming vs. PCS network in cities where you
    would expect to have good PCS coverage. I have had to "add on" a
    feature, with extra monthly charges, to get "free roaming".

    >I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >signal that my Verizon phone would? I understand that, all other things
    >being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.


    Anytime you drop off the PCS network to an analogue signal, you are
    roaming, and roaming charges (in my case, 41 cents a minute) apply.

    >I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >changed?


    I do not have a good opinion of Sprint. Every time I see their ads
    where they talk about "nationwide coverage with no roaming" it just
    infuriates me.

    I am changing at the end of this billing cycle.


    Deb
     
  6. On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 18:37:48 -0700, "Michael L."
    <FIGHTALLSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >My Verizon contract is up, and I went to Radio Shack today to compare
    >phones. I'm very happy with Verizon, except, and this is important, I
    >can only get a Verizon signal in one room of my house, and even that is
    >a bit spotty. My daughter tells me that one of her friends has Sprint,
    >and she gets reception everywhere in my house. My daughter also can't
    >get Verizon reception in her dorm room back in Massachusets, and she
    >says her friends with Sprint phones can.


    I have the opposite experience, although I can receive a signal in my
    home, I cannot receive a signal in my son's home (or within a mile of
    his home, just outside Downtown Disney in Orlando). I also cannot
    receive a signal in many areas of my home calling area in
    Jacksonville, FL. In the case of one client, I was standing outside
    in their parking lot, immediately next to I95 in the middle of
    Jacksonville, and could not get a signal, other than roaming.

    >The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >everywhere in the US.


    And, roaming is the key word. I travel across the country, and
    frequently wind up with roaming vs. PCS network in cities where you
    would expect to have good PCS coverage. I have had to "add on" a
    feature, with extra monthly charges, to get "free roaming".

    >I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >signal that my Verizon phone would? I understand that, all other things
    >being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.


    Anytime you drop off the PCS network to an analogue signal, you are
    roaming, and roaming charges (in my case, 41 cents a minute) apply.

    >I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >changed?


    I do not have a good opinion of Sprint. Every time I see their ads
    where they talk about "nationwide coverage with no roaming" it just
    infuriates me.

    I am changing at the end of this billing cycle.


    Deb
     
  7. On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 18:37:48 -0700, "Michael L."
    <FIGHTALLSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >My Verizon contract is up, and I went to Radio Shack today to compare
    >phones. I'm very happy with Verizon, except, and this is important, I
    >can only get a Verizon signal in one room of my house, and even that is
    >a bit spotty. My daughter tells me that one of her friends has Sprint,
    >and she gets reception everywhere in my house. My daughter also can't
    >get Verizon reception in her dorm room back in Massachusets, and she
    >says her friends with Sprint phones can.


    I have the opposite experience, although I can receive a signal in my
    home, I cannot receive a signal in my son's home (or within a mile of
    his home, just outside Downtown Disney in Orlando). I also cannot
    receive a signal in many areas of my home calling area in
    Jacksonville, FL. In the case of one client, I was standing outside
    in their parking lot, immediately next to I95 in the middle of
    Jacksonville, and could not get a signal, other than roaming.

    >The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >everywhere in the US.


    And, roaming is the key word. I travel across the country, and
    frequently wind up with roaming vs. PCS network in cities where you
    would expect to have good PCS coverage. I have had to "add on" a
    feature, with extra monthly charges, to get "free roaming".

    >I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >signal that my Verizon phone would? I understand that, all other things
    >being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.


    Anytime you drop off the PCS network to an analogue signal, you are
    roaming, and roaming charges (in my case, 41 cents a minute) apply.

    >I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >changed?


    I do not have a good opinion of Sprint. Every time I see their ads
    where they talk about "nationwide coverage with no roaming" it just
    infuriates me.

    I am changing at the end of this billing cycle.


    Deb
     
  8. On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 18:37:48 -0700, "Michael L."
    <FIGHTALLSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >My Verizon contract is up, and I went to Radio Shack today to compare
    >phones. I'm very happy with Verizon, except, and this is important, I
    >can only get a Verizon signal in one room of my house, and even that is
    >a bit spotty. My daughter tells me that one of her friends has Sprint,
    >and she gets reception everywhere in my house. My daughter also can't
    >get Verizon reception in her dorm room back in Massachusets, and she
    >says her friends with Sprint phones can.


    I have the opposite experience, although I can receive a signal in my
    home, I cannot receive a signal in my son's home (or within a mile of
    his home, just outside Downtown Disney in Orlando). I also cannot
    receive a signal in many areas of my home calling area in
    Jacksonville, FL. In the case of one client, I was standing outside
    in their parking lot, immediately next to I95 in the middle of
    Jacksonville, and could not get a signal, other than roaming.

    >The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >everywhere in the US.


    And, roaming is the key word. I travel across the country, and
    frequently wind up with roaming vs. PCS network in cities where you
    would expect to have good PCS coverage. I have had to "add on" a
    feature, with extra monthly charges, to get "free roaming".

    >I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >signal that my Verizon phone would? I understand that, all other things
    >being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.


    Anytime you drop off the PCS network to an analogue signal, you are
    roaming, and roaming charges (in my case, 41 cents a minute) apply.

    >I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >changed?


    I do not have a good opinion of Sprint. Every time I see their ads
    where they talk about "nationwide coverage with no roaming" it just
    infuriates me.

    I am changing at the end of this billing cycle.


    Deb
     
  9. On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 18:37:48 -0700, "Michael L."
    <FIGHTALLSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >My Verizon contract is up, and I went to Radio Shack today to compare
    >phones. I'm very happy with Verizon, except, and this is important, I
    >can only get a Verizon signal in one room of my house, and even that is
    >a bit spotty. My daughter tells me that one of her friends has Sprint,
    >and she gets reception everywhere in my house. My daughter also can't
    >get Verizon reception in her dorm room back in Massachusets, and she
    >says her friends with Sprint phones can.


    I have the opposite experience, although I can receive a signal in my
    home, I cannot receive a signal in my son's home (or within a mile of
    his home, just outside Downtown Disney in Orlando). I also cannot
    receive a signal in many areas of my home calling area in
    Jacksonville, FL. In the case of one client, I was standing outside
    in their parking lot, immediately next to I95 in the middle of
    Jacksonville, and could not get a signal, other than roaming.

    >The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >everywhere in the US.


    And, roaming is the key word. I travel across the country, and
    frequently wind up with roaming vs. PCS network in cities where you
    would expect to have good PCS coverage. I have had to "add on" a
    feature, with extra monthly charges, to get "free roaming".

    >I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >signal that my Verizon phone would? I understand that, all other things
    >being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.


    Anytime you drop off the PCS network to an analogue signal, you are
    roaming, and roaming charges (in my case, 41 cents a minute) apply.

    >I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >changed?


    I do not have a good opinion of Sprint. Every time I see their ads
    where they talk about "nationwide coverage with no roaming" it just
    infuriates me.

    I am changing at the end of this billing cycle.


    Deb
     
  10. On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 18:37:48 -0700, "Michael L."
    <FIGHTALLSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >My Verizon contract is up, and I went to Radio Shack today to compare
    >phones. I'm very happy with Verizon, except, and this is important, I
    >can only get a Verizon signal in one room of my house, and even that is
    >a bit spotty. My daughter tells me that one of her friends has Sprint,
    >and she gets reception everywhere in my house. My daughter also can't
    >get Verizon reception in her dorm room back in Massachusets, and she
    >says her friends with Sprint phones can.


    I have the opposite experience, although I can receive a signal in my
    home, I cannot receive a signal in my son's home (or within a mile of
    his home, just outside Downtown Disney in Orlando). I also cannot
    receive a signal in many areas of my home calling area in
    Jacksonville, FL. In the case of one client, I was standing outside
    in their parking lot, immediately next to I95 in the middle of
    Jacksonville, and could not get a signal, other than roaming.

    >The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >everywhere in the US.


    And, roaming is the key word. I travel across the country, and
    frequently wind up with roaming vs. PCS network in cities where you
    would expect to have good PCS coverage. I have had to "add on" a
    feature, with extra monthly charges, to get "free roaming".

    >I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >signal that my Verizon phone would? I understand that, all other things
    >being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.


    Anytime you drop off the PCS network to an analogue signal, you are
    roaming, and roaming charges (in my case, 41 cents a minute) apply.

    >I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >changed?


    I do not have a good opinion of Sprint. Every time I see their ads
    where they talk about "nationwide coverage with no roaming" it just
    infuriates me.

    I am changing at the end of this billing cycle.


    Deb
     
  11. On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 18:37:48 -0700, "Michael L."
    <FIGHTALLSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >My Verizon contract is up, and I went to Radio Shack today to compare
    >phones. I'm very happy with Verizon, except, and this is important, I
    >can only get a Verizon signal in one room of my house, and even that is
    >a bit spotty. My daughter tells me that one of her friends has Sprint,
    >and she gets reception everywhere in my house. My daughter also can't
    >get Verizon reception in her dorm room back in Massachusets, and she
    >says her friends with Sprint phones can.


    I have the opposite experience, although I can receive a signal in my
    home, I cannot receive a signal in my son's home (or within a mile of
    his home, just outside Downtown Disney in Orlando). I also cannot
    receive a signal in many areas of my home calling area in
    Jacksonville, FL. In the case of one client, I was standing outside
    in their parking lot, immediately next to I95 in the middle of
    Jacksonville, and could not get a signal, other than roaming.

    >The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >everywhere in the US.


    And, roaming is the key word. I travel across the country, and
    frequently wind up with roaming vs. PCS network in cities where you
    would expect to have good PCS coverage. I have had to "add on" a
    feature, with extra monthly charges, to get "free roaming".

    >I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >signal that my Verizon phone would? I understand that, all other things
    >being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.


    Anytime you drop off the PCS network to an analogue signal, you are
    roaming, and roaming charges (in my case, 41 cents a minute) apply.

    >I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >changed?


    I do not have a good opinion of Sprint. Every time I see their ads
    where they talk about "nationwide coverage with no roaming" it just
    infuriates me.

    I am changing at the end of this billing cycle.


    Deb
     
  12. On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 18:37:48 -0700, "Michael L."
    <FIGHTALLSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >My Verizon contract is up, and I went to Radio Shack today to compare
    >phones. I'm very happy with Verizon, except, and this is important, I
    >can only get a Verizon signal in one room of my house, and even that is
    >a bit spotty. My daughter tells me that one of her friends has Sprint,
    >and she gets reception everywhere in my house. My daughter also can't
    >get Verizon reception in her dorm room back in Massachusets, and she
    >says her friends with Sprint phones can.


    I have the opposite experience, although I can receive a signal in my
    home, I cannot receive a signal in my son's home (or within a mile of
    his home, just outside Downtown Disney in Orlando). I also cannot
    receive a signal in many areas of my home calling area in
    Jacksonville, FL. In the case of one client, I was standing outside
    in their parking lot, immediately next to I95 in the middle of
    Jacksonville, and could not get a signal, other than roaming.

    >The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >everywhere in the US.


    And, roaming is the key word. I travel across the country, and
    frequently wind up with roaming vs. PCS network in cities where you
    would expect to have good PCS coverage. I have had to "add on" a
    feature, with extra monthly charges, to get "free roaming".

    >I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >signal that my Verizon phone would? I understand that, all other things
    >being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.


    Anytime you drop off the PCS network to an analogue signal, you are
    roaming, and roaming charges (in my case, 41 cents a minute) apply.

    >I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >changed?


    I do not have a good opinion of Sprint. Every time I see their ads
    where they talk about "nationwide coverage with no roaming" it just
    infuriates me.

    I am changing at the end of this billing cycle.


    Deb
     
  13. On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 18:37:48 -0700, "Michael L."
    <FIGHTALLSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >My Verizon contract is up, and I went to Radio Shack today to compare
    >phones. I'm very happy with Verizon, except, and this is important, I
    >can only get a Verizon signal in one room of my house, and even that is
    >a bit spotty. My daughter tells me that one of her friends has Sprint,
    >and she gets reception everywhere in my house. My daughter also can't
    >get Verizon reception in her dorm room back in Massachusets, and she
    >says her friends with Sprint phones can.


    I have the opposite experience, although I can receive a signal in my
    home, I cannot receive a signal in my son's home (or within a mile of
    his home, just outside Downtown Disney in Orlando). I also cannot
    receive a signal in many areas of my home calling area in
    Jacksonville, FL. In the case of one client, I was standing outside
    in their parking lot, immediately next to I95 in the middle of
    Jacksonville, and could not get a signal, other than roaming.

    >The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >everywhere in the US.


    And, roaming is the key word. I travel across the country, and
    frequently wind up with roaming vs. PCS network in cities where you
    would expect to have good PCS coverage. I have had to "add on" a
    feature, with extra monthly charges, to get "free roaming".

    >I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >signal that my Verizon phone would? I understand that, all other things
    >being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.


    Anytime you drop off the PCS network to an analogue signal, you are
    roaming, and roaming charges (in my case, 41 cents a minute) apply.

    >I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >changed?


    I do not have a good opinion of Sprint. Every time I see their ads
    where they talk about "nationwide coverage with no roaming" it just
    infuriates me.

    I am changing at the end of this billing cycle.


    Deb
     
  14. On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 18:37:48 -0700, "Michael L."
    <FIGHTALLSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >My Verizon contract is up, and I went to Radio Shack today to compare
    >phones. I'm very happy with Verizon, except, and this is important, I
    >can only get a Verizon signal in one room of my house, and even that is
    >a bit spotty. My daughter tells me that one of her friends has Sprint,
    >and she gets reception everywhere in my house. My daughter also can't
    >get Verizon reception in her dorm room back in Massachusets, and she
    >says her friends with Sprint phones can.


    I have the opposite experience, although I can receive a signal in my
    home, I cannot receive a signal in my son's home (or within a mile of
    his home, just outside Downtown Disney in Orlando). I also cannot
    receive a signal in many areas of my home calling area in
    Jacksonville, FL. In the case of one client, I was standing outside
    in their parking lot, immediately next to I95 in the middle of
    Jacksonville, and could not get a signal, other than roaming.

    >The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >everywhere in the US.


    And, roaming is the key word. I travel across the country, and
    frequently wind up with roaming vs. PCS network in cities where you
    would expect to have good PCS coverage. I have had to "add on" a
    feature, with extra monthly charges, to get "free roaming".

    >I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >signal that my Verizon phone would? I understand that, all other things
    >being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.


    Anytime you drop off the PCS network to an analogue signal, you are
    roaming, and roaming charges (in my case, 41 cents a minute) apply.

    >I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >changed?


    I do not have a good opinion of Sprint. Every time I see their ads
    where they talk about "nationwide coverage with no roaming" it just
    infuriates me.

    I am changing at the end of this billing cycle.


    Deb
     
  15. On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 18:37:48 -0700, "Michael L."
    <FIGHTALLSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >My Verizon contract is up, and I went to Radio Shack today to compare
    >phones. I'm very happy with Verizon, except, and this is important, I
    >can only get a Verizon signal in one room of my house, and even that is
    >a bit spotty. My daughter tells me that one of her friends has Sprint,
    >and she gets reception everywhere in my house. My daughter also can't
    >get Verizon reception in her dorm room back in Massachusets, and she
    >says her friends with Sprint phones can.


    I have the opposite experience, although I can receive a signal in my
    home, I cannot receive a signal in my son's home (or within a mile of
    his home, just outside Downtown Disney in Orlando). I also cannot
    receive a signal in many areas of my home calling area in
    Jacksonville, FL. In the case of one client, I was standing outside
    in their parking lot, immediately next to I95 in the middle of
    Jacksonville, and could not get a signal, other than roaming.

    >The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >everywhere in the US.


    And, roaming is the key word. I travel across the country, and
    frequently wind up with roaming vs. PCS network in cities where you
    would expect to have good PCS coverage. I have had to "add on" a
    feature, with extra monthly charges, to get "free roaming".

    >I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >signal that my Verizon phone would? I understand that, all other things
    >being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.


    Anytime you drop off the PCS network to an analogue signal, you are
    roaming, and roaming charges (in my case, 41 cents a minute) apply.

    >I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >changed?


    I do not have a good opinion of Sprint. Every time I see their ads
    where they talk about "nationwide coverage with no roaming" it just
    infuriates me.

    I am changing at the end of this billing cycle.


    Deb
     
  16. On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 18:37:48 -0700, "Michael L."
    <FIGHTALLSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >My Verizon contract is up, and I went to Radio Shack today to compare
    >phones. I'm very happy with Verizon, except, and this is important, I
    >can only get a Verizon signal in one room of my house, and even that is
    >a bit spotty. My daughter tells me that one of her friends has Sprint,
    >and she gets reception everywhere in my house. My daughter also can't
    >get Verizon reception in her dorm room back in Massachusets, and she
    >says her friends with Sprint phones can.


    I have the opposite experience, although I can receive a signal in my
    home, I cannot receive a signal in my son's home (or within a mile of
    his home, just outside Downtown Disney in Orlando). I also cannot
    receive a signal in many areas of my home calling area in
    Jacksonville, FL. In the case of one client, I was standing outside
    in their parking lot, immediately next to I95 in the middle of
    Jacksonville, and could not get a signal, other than roaming.

    >The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >everywhere in the US.


    And, roaming is the key word. I travel across the country, and
    frequently wind up with roaming vs. PCS network in cities where you
    would expect to have good PCS coverage. I have had to "add on" a
    feature, with extra monthly charges, to get "free roaming".

    >I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >signal that my Verizon phone would? I understand that, all other things
    >being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.


    Anytime you drop off the PCS network to an analogue signal, you are
    roaming, and roaming charges (in my case, 41 cents a minute) apply.

    >I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >changed?


    I do not have a good opinion of Sprint. Every time I see their ads
    where they talk about "nationwide coverage with no roaming" it just
    infuriates me.

    I am changing at the end of this billing cycle.


    Deb
     
  17. On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 18:37:48 -0700, "Michael L."
    <FIGHTALLSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >My Verizon contract is up, and I went to Radio Shack today to compare
    >phones. I'm very happy with Verizon, except, and this is important, I
    >can only get a Verizon signal in one room of my house, and even that is
    >a bit spotty. My daughter tells me that one of her friends has Sprint,
    >and she gets reception everywhere in my house. My daughter also can't
    >get Verizon reception in her dorm room back in Massachusets, and she
    >says her friends with Sprint phones can.


    I have the opposite experience, although I can receive a signal in my
    home, I cannot receive a signal in my son's home (or within a mile of
    his home, just outside Downtown Disney in Orlando). I also cannot
    receive a signal in many areas of my home calling area in
    Jacksonville, FL. In the case of one client, I was standing outside
    in their parking lot, immediately next to I95 in the middle of
    Jacksonville, and could not get a signal, other than roaming.

    >The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >everywhere in the US.


    And, roaming is the key word. I travel across the country, and
    frequently wind up with roaming vs. PCS network in cities where you
    would expect to have good PCS coverage. I have had to "add on" a
    feature, with extra monthly charges, to get "free roaming".

    >I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >signal that my Verizon phone would? I understand that, all other things
    >being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.


    Anytime you drop off the PCS network to an analogue signal, you are
    roaming, and roaming charges (in my case, 41 cents a minute) apply.

    >I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >changed?


    I do not have a good opinion of Sprint. Every time I see their ads
    where they talk about "nationwide coverage with no roaming" it just
    infuriates me.

    I am changing at the end of this billing cycle.


    Deb
     
  18. On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 18:37:48 -0700, "Michael L."
    <FIGHTALLSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >My Verizon contract is up, and I went to Radio Shack today to compare
    >phones. I'm very happy with Verizon, except, and this is important, I
    >can only get a Verizon signal in one room of my house, and even that is
    >a bit spotty. My daughter tells me that one of her friends has Sprint,
    >and she gets reception everywhere in my house. My daughter also can't
    >get Verizon reception in her dorm room back in Massachusets, and she
    >says her friends with Sprint phones can.


    I have the opposite experience, although I can receive a signal in my
    home, I cannot receive a signal in my son's home (or within a mile of
    his home, just outside Downtown Disney in Orlando). I also cannot
    receive a signal in many areas of my home calling area in
    Jacksonville, FL. In the case of one client, I was standing outside
    in their parking lot, immediately next to I95 in the middle of
    Jacksonville, and could not get a signal, other than roaming.

    >The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >everywhere in the US.


    And, roaming is the key word. I travel across the country, and
    frequently wind up with roaming vs. PCS network in cities where you
    would expect to have good PCS coverage. I have had to "add on" a
    feature, with extra monthly charges, to get "free roaming".

    >I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >signal that my Verizon phone would? I understand that, all other things
    >being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.


    Anytime you drop off the PCS network to an analogue signal, you are
    roaming, and roaming charges (in my case, 41 cents a minute) apply.

    >I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >changed?


    I do not have a good opinion of Sprint. Every time I see their ads
    where they talk about "nationwide coverage with no roaming" it just
    infuriates me.

    I am changing at the end of this billing cycle.


    Deb
     
  19. On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 18:37:48 -0700, "Michael L."
    <FIGHTALLSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >My Verizon contract is up, and I went to Radio Shack today to compare
    >phones. I'm very happy with Verizon, except, and this is important, I
    >can only get a Verizon signal in one room of my house, and even that is
    >a bit spotty. My daughter tells me that one of her friends has Sprint,
    >and she gets reception everywhere in my house. My daughter also can't
    >get Verizon reception in her dorm room back in Massachusets, and she
    >says her friends with Sprint phones can.


    I have the opposite experience, although I can receive a signal in my
    home, I cannot receive a signal in my son's home (or within a mile of
    his home, just outside Downtown Disney in Orlando). I also cannot
    receive a signal in many areas of my home calling area in
    Jacksonville, FL. In the case of one client, I was standing outside
    in their parking lot, immediately next to I95 in the middle of
    Jacksonville, and could not get a signal, other than roaming.

    >The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >everywhere in the US.


    And, roaming is the key word. I travel across the country, and
    frequently wind up with roaming vs. PCS network in cities where you
    would expect to have good PCS coverage. I have had to "add on" a
    feature, with extra monthly charges, to get "free roaming".

    >I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >signal that my Verizon phone would? I understand that, all other things
    >being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.


    Anytime you drop off the PCS network to an analogue signal, you are
    roaming, and roaming charges (in my case, 41 cents a minute) apply.

    >I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >changed?


    I do not have a good opinion of Sprint. Every time I see their ads
    where they talk about "nationwide coverage with no roaming" it just
    infuriates me.

    I am changing at the end of this billing cycle.


    Deb
     
  20. On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 18:37:48 -0700, "Michael L."
    <FIGHTALLSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >My Verizon contract is up, and I went to Radio Shack today to compare
    >phones. I'm very happy with Verizon, except, and this is important, I
    >can only get a Verizon signal in one room of my house, and even that is
    >a bit spotty. My daughter tells me that one of her friends has Sprint,
    >and she gets reception everywhere in my house. My daughter also can't
    >get Verizon reception in her dorm room back in Massachusets, and she
    >says her friends with Sprint phones can.


    I have the opposite experience, although I can receive a signal in my
    home, I cannot receive a signal in my son's home (or within a mile of
    his home, just outside Downtown Disney in Orlando). I also cannot
    receive a signal in many areas of my home calling area in
    Jacksonville, FL. In the case of one client, I was standing outside
    in their parking lot, immediately next to I95 in the middle of
    Jacksonville, and could not get a signal, other than roaming.

    >The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >everywhere in the US.


    And, roaming is the key word. I travel across the country, and
    frequently wind up with roaming vs. PCS network in cities where you
    would expect to have good PCS coverage. I have had to "add on" a
    feature, with extra monthly charges, to get "free roaming".

    >I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >signal that my Verizon phone would? I understand that, all other things
    >being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.


    Anytime you drop off the PCS network to an analogue signal, you are
    roaming, and roaming charges (in my case, 41 cents a minute) apply.

    >I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >changed?


    I do not have a good opinion of Sprint. Every time I see their ads
    where they talk about "nationwide coverage with no roaming" it just
    infuriates me.

    I am changing at the end of this billing cycle.


    Deb
     

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