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Switching to Sprint? Opinions?

Discussion in 'alt.cellular.verizon' started by Michael L., Jun 7, 2004.

  1. On Tue, 08 Jun 2004 02:40:49 GMT, "Bob Smith"
    <usirsclt_No_Spam_@earthlink.net> wrote:


    >
    >I've noticed you've brought back that 1,400,000 number in the past two days.
    >So Phillipe, just where is that simple copy and paste, along with a page
    >number out of the 10Q. After 20 plus requests from quite a few people here,
    >including yours truly, you still haven't backed up your statement.


    I can't speak about the number of customers who have left, but
    according to the FCC 2003 posting of complaint statistics, Sprint PCS
    was second only to AT&T in the number of complaints per 10K users.

    http://www.consumersunion.org/pub/0511 FCC_Cell_ComplaintsAll3.pdf
    is the link to the graphic.

    AT&T wireless had 3.39 per 10K, Sprint had 2.25 per 10K with the other
    providers listed all having 1.6 or less.

    >
    >> I'd say borrow your daughter's friends Sprint phone this weekend.

    >
    >That would be a good idea, as long as she didn't need it and had the N & W
    >option on here account.
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> > I like Verizon very much-- had customer service issues with them in the
    >> > past, but they've been better this past year, and they work well for me
    >> > when I travel in Los Angeles, where I spend a lot of time, and in the
    >> > East Coast, where I often do work as well. Reception in my home is a
    >> > significant issue, however, and I'd like to have it.
    >> >
    >> > The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >> > CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >> > 1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >> > tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >> > with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >> > everywhere in the US.

    >>
    >> Sprint natively uses only 1900 MHz. You can only roam where SprintPCS
    >> allows you to roam, not just anywhere.
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> > I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >> > tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >> > Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >> > an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >> > is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >> > signal that my Verizon phone would?

    >
    >Actually, with SPCS's newly issued PRL, if you were out of SPCS's coverage,
    >you could be roaming on 800 CDMA before 800 Analog. It all depends on who
    >the agreement is with.
    >>
    >> If SprintPCS has a roaming agreement with the same analog provider, then
    >> yes.
    >>
    >> > I understand that, all other things
    >> > being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >> > I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >> > importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.

    >>
    >> Everyplace is different depending on each companies roaming agreements.
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Obviously, the easy answer to this would be to try Sprint for 14 days
    >> > and see how I like it. Unfortunately, I'm on a family plan with 4
    >> > phones, so it would be a huge pain to try it, not like it, and go back
    >> > to Verizon.

    >
    >Well, you can try one phone on their new F & F plan, within the 14 day trial
    >period. If you find that it works for you, then you can decide whether you
    >want to port all your numbers off to SPCS.
    >> >
    >> > I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >> > companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >> > that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >> > changed?
    >> >

    >Yes, it has. SPCS has added a lot of towers in the LA, SF & SD metro areas.
    >We have a few folks who post here from the LA & SF areas, and all find
    >satisfactory coverage.
    >
    >> > Does anyone have any comments comparing the 1900 MHZ CDMA Sprint quality
    >> > with Verizon's 800 MHZ CDMA quality?

    >>
    >> All things being equal (and they never are), 800 MHz would be better;
    >> but you've already indicated you think SprintPCS has better coverage in
    >> your area.
    >> Your best bet is to borrow your daughter's friends' Sprint phone
    >> this weekend. Pay her $20 for the insult, it's a bargain to get good
    >> hands-on knowledge of how good SprintPCS would be for you.
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Thanks in advance,
    >> > Michael

    >
    >Anytime ... :)
    >
    >Bob
    >


    Deb
     



    › See More: Switching to Sprint? Opinions?
  2. On Tue, 08 Jun 2004 02:40:49 GMT, "Bob Smith"
    <usirsclt_No_Spam_@earthlink.net> wrote:


    >
    >I've noticed you've brought back that 1,400,000 number in the past two days.
    >So Phillipe, just where is that simple copy and paste, along with a page
    >number out of the 10Q. After 20 plus requests from quite a few people here,
    >including yours truly, you still haven't backed up your statement.


    I can't speak about the number of customers who have left, but
    according to the FCC 2003 posting of complaint statistics, Sprint PCS
    was second only to AT&T in the number of complaints per 10K users.

    http://www.consumersunion.org/pub/0511 FCC_Cell_ComplaintsAll3.pdf
    is the link to the graphic.

    AT&T wireless had 3.39 per 10K, Sprint had 2.25 per 10K with the other
    providers listed all having 1.6 or less.

    >
    >> I'd say borrow your daughter's friends Sprint phone this weekend.

    >
    >That would be a good idea, as long as she didn't need it and had the N & W
    >option on here account.
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> > I like Verizon very much-- had customer service issues with them in the
    >> > past, but they've been better this past year, and they work well for me
    >> > when I travel in Los Angeles, where I spend a lot of time, and in the
    >> > East Coast, where I often do work as well. Reception in my home is a
    >> > significant issue, however, and I'd like to have it.
    >> >
    >> > The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >> > CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >> > 1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >> > tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >> > with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >> > everywhere in the US.

    >>
    >> Sprint natively uses only 1900 MHz. You can only roam where SprintPCS
    >> allows you to roam, not just anywhere.
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> > I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >> > tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >> > Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >> > an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >> > is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >> > signal that my Verizon phone would?

    >
    >Actually, with SPCS's newly issued PRL, if you were out of SPCS's coverage,
    >you could be roaming on 800 CDMA before 800 Analog. It all depends on who
    >the agreement is with.
    >>
    >> If SprintPCS has a roaming agreement with the same analog provider, then
    >> yes.
    >>
    >> > I understand that, all other things
    >> > being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >> > I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >> > importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.

    >>
    >> Everyplace is different depending on each companies roaming agreements.
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Obviously, the easy answer to this would be to try Sprint for 14 days
    >> > and see how I like it. Unfortunately, I'm on a family plan with 4
    >> > phones, so it would be a huge pain to try it, not like it, and go back
    >> > to Verizon.

    >
    >Well, you can try one phone on their new F & F plan, within the 14 day trial
    >period. If you find that it works for you, then you can decide whether you
    >want to port all your numbers off to SPCS.
    >> >
    >> > I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >> > companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >> > that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >> > changed?
    >> >

    >Yes, it has. SPCS has added a lot of towers in the LA, SF & SD metro areas.
    >We have a few folks who post here from the LA & SF areas, and all find
    >satisfactory coverage.
    >
    >> > Does anyone have any comments comparing the 1900 MHZ CDMA Sprint quality
    >> > with Verizon's 800 MHZ CDMA quality?

    >>
    >> All things being equal (and they never are), 800 MHz would be better;
    >> but you've already indicated you think SprintPCS has better coverage in
    >> your area.
    >> Your best bet is to borrow your daughter's friends' Sprint phone
    >> this weekend. Pay her $20 for the insult, it's a bargain to get good
    >> hands-on knowledge of how good SprintPCS would be for you.
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Thanks in advance,
    >> > Michael

    >
    >Anytime ... :)
    >
    >Bob
    >


    Deb
     
  3. On Tue, 08 Jun 2004 02:40:49 GMT, "Bob Smith"
    <usirsclt_No_Spam_@earthlink.net> wrote:


    >
    >I've noticed you've brought back that 1,400,000 number in the past two days.
    >So Phillipe, just where is that simple copy and paste, along with a page
    >number out of the 10Q. After 20 plus requests from quite a few people here,
    >including yours truly, you still haven't backed up your statement.


    I can't speak about the number of customers who have left, but
    according to the FCC 2003 posting of complaint statistics, Sprint PCS
    was second only to AT&T in the number of complaints per 10K users.

    http://www.consumersunion.org/pub/0511 FCC_Cell_ComplaintsAll3.pdf
    is the link to the graphic.

    AT&T wireless had 3.39 per 10K, Sprint had 2.25 per 10K with the other
    providers listed all having 1.6 or less.

    >
    >> I'd say borrow your daughter's friends Sprint phone this weekend.

    >
    >That would be a good idea, as long as she didn't need it and had the N & W
    >option on here account.
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> > I like Verizon very much-- had customer service issues with them in the
    >> > past, but they've been better this past year, and they work well for me
    >> > when I travel in Los Angeles, where I spend a lot of time, and in the
    >> > East Coast, where I often do work as well. Reception in my home is a
    >> > significant issue, however, and I'd like to have it.
    >> >
    >> > The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >> > CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >> > 1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >> > tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >> > with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >> > everywhere in the US.

    >>
    >> Sprint natively uses only 1900 MHz. You can only roam where SprintPCS
    >> allows you to roam, not just anywhere.
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> > I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >> > tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >> > Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >> > an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >> > is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >> > signal that my Verizon phone would?

    >
    >Actually, with SPCS's newly issued PRL, if you were out of SPCS's coverage,
    >you could be roaming on 800 CDMA before 800 Analog. It all depends on who
    >the agreement is with.
    >>
    >> If SprintPCS has a roaming agreement with the same analog provider, then
    >> yes.
    >>
    >> > I understand that, all other things
    >> > being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >> > I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >> > importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.

    >>
    >> Everyplace is different depending on each companies roaming agreements.
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Obviously, the easy answer to this would be to try Sprint for 14 days
    >> > and see how I like it. Unfortunately, I'm on a family plan with 4
    >> > phones, so it would be a huge pain to try it, not like it, and go back
    >> > to Verizon.

    >
    >Well, you can try one phone on their new F & F plan, within the 14 day trial
    >period. If you find that it works for you, then you can decide whether you
    >want to port all your numbers off to SPCS.
    >> >
    >> > I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >> > companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >> > that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >> > changed?
    >> >

    >Yes, it has. SPCS has added a lot of towers in the LA, SF & SD metro areas.
    >We have a few folks who post here from the LA & SF areas, and all find
    >satisfactory coverage.
    >
    >> > Does anyone have any comments comparing the 1900 MHZ CDMA Sprint quality
    >> > with Verizon's 800 MHZ CDMA quality?

    >>
    >> All things being equal (and they never are), 800 MHz would be better;
    >> but you've already indicated you think SprintPCS has better coverage in
    >> your area.
    >> Your best bet is to borrow your daughter's friends' Sprint phone
    >> this weekend. Pay her $20 for the insult, it's a bargain to get good
    >> hands-on knowledge of how good SprintPCS would be for you.
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Thanks in advance,
    >> > Michael

    >
    >Anytime ... :)
    >
    >Bob
    >


    Deb
     
  4. On Tue, 08 Jun 2004 02:40:49 GMT, "Bob Smith"
    <usirsclt_No_Spam_@earthlink.net> wrote:


    >
    >I've noticed you've brought back that 1,400,000 number in the past two days.
    >So Phillipe, just where is that simple copy and paste, along with a page
    >number out of the 10Q. After 20 plus requests from quite a few people here,
    >including yours truly, you still haven't backed up your statement.


    I can't speak about the number of customers who have left, but
    according to the FCC 2003 posting of complaint statistics, Sprint PCS
    was second only to AT&T in the number of complaints per 10K users.

    http://www.consumersunion.org/pub/0511 FCC_Cell_ComplaintsAll3.pdf
    is the link to the graphic.

    AT&T wireless had 3.39 per 10K, Sprint had 2.25 per 10K with the other
    providers listed all having 1.6 or less.

    >
    >> I'd say borrow your daughter's friends Sprint phone this weekend.

    >
    >That would be a good idea, as long as she didn't need it and had the N & W
    >option on here account.
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> > I like Verizon very much-- had customer service issues with them in the
    >> > past, but they've been better this past year, and they work well for me
    >> > when I travel in Los Angeles, where I spend a lot of time, and in the
    >> > East Coast, where I often do work as well. Reception in my home is a
    >> > significant issue, however, and I'd like to have it.
    >> >
    >> > The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >> > CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >> > 1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >> > tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >> > with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >> > everywhere in the US.

    >>
    >> Sprint natively uses only 1900 MHz. You can only roam where SprintPCS
    >> allows you to roam, not just anywhere.
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> > I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >> > tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >> > Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >> > an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >> > is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >> > signal that my Verizon phone would?

    >
    >Actually, with SPCS's newly issued PRL, if you were out of SPCS's coverage,
    >you could be roaming on 800 CDMA before 800 Analog. It all depends on who
    >the agreement is with.
    >>
    >> If SprintPCS has a roaming agreement with the same analog provider, then
    >> yes.
    >>
    >> > I understand that, all other things
    >> > being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >> > I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >> > importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.

    >>
    >> Everyplace is different depending on each companies roaming agreements.
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Obviously, the easy answer to this would be to try Sprint for 14 days
    >> > and see how I like it. Unfortunately, I'm on a family plan with 4
    >> > phones, so it would be a huge pain to try it, not like it, and go back
    >> > to Verizon.

    >
    >Well, you can try one phone on their new F & F plan, within the 14 day trial
    >period. If you find that it works for you, then you can decide whether you
    >want to port all your numbers off to SPCS.
    >> >
    >> > I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >> > companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >> > that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >> > changed?
    >> >

    >Yes, it has. SPCS has added a lot of towers in the LA, SF & SD metro areas.
    >We have a few folks who post here from the LA & SF areas, and all find
    >satisfactory coverage.
    >
    >> > Does anyone have any comments comparing the 1900 MHZ CDMA Sprint quality
    >> > with Verizon's 800 MHZ CDMA quality?

    >>
    >> All things being equal (and they never are), 800 MHz would be better;
    >> but you've already indicated you think SprintPCS has better coverage in
    >> your area.
    >> Your best bet is to borrow your daughter's friends' Sprint phone
    >> this weekend. Pay her $20 for the insult, it's a bargain to get good
    >> hands-on knowledge of how good SprintPCS would be for you.
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Thanks in advance,
    >> > Michael

    >
    >Anytime ... :)
    >
    >Bob
    >


    Deb
     
  5. On Tue, 08 Jun 2004 02:40:49 GMT, "Bob Smith"
    <usirsclt_No_Spam_@earthlink.net> wrote:


    >
    >I've noticed you've brought back that 1,400,000 number in the past two days.
    >So Phillipe, just where is that simple copy and paste, along with a page
    >number out of the 10Q. After 20 plus requests from quite a few people here,
    >including yours truly, you still haven't backed up your statement.


    I can't speak about the number of customers who have left, but
    according to the FCC 2003 posting of complaint statistics, Sprint PCS
    was second only to AT&T in the number of complaints per 10K users.

    http://www.consumersunion.org/pub/0511 FCC_Cell_ComplaintsAll3.pdf
    is the link to the graphic.

    AT&T wireless had 3.39 per 10K, Sprint had 2.25 per 10K with the other
    providers listed all having 1.6 or less.

    >
    >> I'd say borrow your daughter's friends Sprint phone this weekend.

    >
    >That would be a good idea, as long as she didn't need it and had the N & W
    >option on here account.
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> > I like Verizon very much-- had customer service issues with them in the
    >> > past, but they've been better this past year, and they work well for me
    >> > when I travel in Los Angeles, where I spend a lot of time, and in the
    >> > East Coast, where I often do work as well. Reception in my home is a
    >> > significant issue, however, and I'd like to have it.
    >> >
    >> > The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >> > CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >> > 1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >> > tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >> > with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >> > everywhere in the US.

    >>
    >> Sprint natively uses only 1900 MHz. You can only roam where SprintPCS
    >> allows you to roam, not just anywhere.
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> > I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >> > tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >> > Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >> > an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >> > is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >> > signal that my Verizon phone would?

    >
    >Actually, with SPCS's newly issued PRL, if you were out of SPCS's coverage,
    >you could be roaming on 800 CDMA before 800 Analog. It all depends on who
    >the agreement is with.
    >>
    >> If SprintPCS has a roaming agreement with the same analog provider, then
    >> yes.
    >>
    >> > I understand that, all other things
    >> > being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >> > I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >> > importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.

    >>
    >> Everyplace is different depending on each companies roaming agreements.
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Obviously, the easy answer to this would be to try Sprint for 14 days
    >> > and see how I like it. Unfortunately, I'm on a family plan with 4
    >> > phones, so it would be a huge pain to try it, not like it, and go back
    >> > to Verizon.

    >
    >Well, you can try one phone on their new F & F plan, within the 14 day trial
    >period. If you find that it works for you, then you can decide whether you
    >want to port all your numbers off to SPCS.
    >> >
    >> > I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >> > companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >> > that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >> > changed?
    >> >

    >Yes, it has. SPCS has added a lot of towers in the LA, SF & SD metro areas.
    >We have a few folks who post here from the LA & SF areas, and all find
    >satisfactory coverage.
    >
    >> > Does anyone have any comments comparing the 1900 MHZ CDMA Sprint quality
    >> > with Verizon's 800 MHZ CDMA quality?

    >>
    >> All things being equal (and they never are), 800 MHz would be better;
    >> but you've already indicated you think SprintPCS has better coverage in
    >> your area.
    >> Your best bet is to borrow your daughter's friends' Sprint phone
    >> this weekend. Pay her $20 for the insult, it's a bargain to get good
    >> hands-on knowledge of how good SprintPCS would be for you.
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Thanks in advance,
    >> > Michael

    >
    >Anytime ... :)
    >
    >Bob
    >


    Deb
     
  6. On Tue, 08 Jun 2004 02:40:49 GMT, "Bob Smith"
    <usirsclt_No_Spam_@earthlink.net> wrote:


    >
    >I've noticed you've brought back that 1,400,000 number in the past two days.
    >So Phillipe, just where is that simple copy and paste, along with a page
    >number out of the 10Q. After 20 plus requests from quite a few people here,
    >including yours truly, you still haven't backed up your statement.


    I can't speak about the number of customers who have left, but
    according to the FCC 2003 posting of complaint statistics, Sprint PCS
    was second only to AT&T in the number of complaints per 10K users.

    http://www.consumersunion.org/pub/0511 FCC_Cell_ComplaintsAll3.pdf
    is the link to the graphic.

    AT&T wireless had 3.39 per 10K, Sprint had 2.25 per 10K with the other
    providers listed all having 1.6 or less.

    >
    >> I'd say borrow your daughter's friends Sprint phone this weekend.

    >
    >That would be a good idea, as long as she didn't need it and had the N & W
    >option on here account.
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> > I like Verizon very much-- had customer service issues with them in the
    >> > past, but they've been better this past year, and they work well for me
    >> > when I travel in Los Angeles, where I spend a lot of time, and in the
    >> > East Coast, where I often do work as well. Reception in my home is a
    >> > significant issue, however, and I'd like to have it.
    >> >
    >> > The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >> > CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >> > 1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >> > tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >> > with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >> > everywhere in the US.

    >>
    >> Sprint natively uses only 1900 MHz. You can only roam where SprintPCS
    >> allows you to roam, not just anywhere.
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> > I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >> > tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >> > Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >> > an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >> > is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >> > signal that my Verizon phone would?

    >
    >Actually, with SPCS's newly issued PRL, if you were out of SPCS's coverage,
    >you could be roaming on 800 CDMA before 800 Analog. It all depends on who
    >the agreement is with.
    >>
    >> If SprintPCS has a roaming agreement with the same analog provider, then
    >> yes.
    >>
    >> > I understand that, all other things
    >> > being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >> > I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >> > importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.

    >>
    >> Everyplace is different depending on each companies roaming agreements.
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Obviously, the easy answer to this would be to try Sprint for 14 days
    >> > and see how I like it. Unfortunately, I'm on a family plan with 4
    >> > phones, so it would be a huge pain to try it, not like it, and go back
    >> > to Verizon.

    >
    >Well, you can try one phone on their new F & F plan, within the 14 day trial
    >period. If you find that it works for you, then you can decide whether you
    >want to port all your numbers off to SPCS.
    >> >
    >> > I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >> > companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >> > that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >> > changed?
    >> >

    >Yes, it has. SPCS has added a lot of towers in the LA, SF & SD metro areas.
    >We have a few folks who post here from the LA & SF areas, and all find
    >satisfactory coverage.
    >
    >> > Does anyone have any comments comparing the 1900 MHZ CDMA Sprint quality
    >> > with Verizon's 800 MHZ CDMA quality?

    >>
    >> All things being equal (and they never are), 800 MHz would be better;
    >> but you've already indicated you think SprintPCS has better coverage in
    >> your area.
    >> Your best bet is to borrow your daughter's friends' Sprint phone
    >> this weekend. Pay her $20 for the insult, it's a bargain to get good
    >> hands-on knowledge of how good SprintPCS would be for you.
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Thanks in advance,
    >> > Michael

    >
    >Anytime ... :)
    >
    >Bob
    >


    Deb
     
  7. On Tue, 08 Jun 2004 02:40:49 GMT, "Bob Smith"
    <usirsclt_No_Spam_@earthlink.net> wrote:


    >
    >I've noticed you've brought back that 1,400,000 number in the past two days.
    >So Phillipe, just where is that simple copy and paste, along with a page
    >number out of the 10Q. After 20 plus requests from quite a few people here,
    >including yours truly, you still haven't backed up your statement.


    I can't speak about the number of customers who have left, but
    according to the FCC 2003 posting of complaint statistics, Sprint PCS
    was second only to AT&T in the number of complaints per 10K users.

    http://www.consumersunion.org/pub/0511 FCC_Cell_ComplaintsAll3.pdf
    is the link to the graphic.

    AT&T wireless had 3.39 per 10K, Sprint had 2.25 per 10K with the other
    providers listed all having 1.6 or less.

    >
    >> I'd say borrow your daughter's friends Sprint phone this weekend.

    >
    >That would be a good idea, as long as she didn't need it and had the N & W
    >option on here account.
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> > I like Verizon very much-- had customer service issues with them in the
    >> > past, but they've been better this past year, and they work well for me
    >> > when I travel in Los Angeles, where I spend a lot of time, and in the
    >> > East Coast, where I often do work as well. Reception in my home is a
    >> > significant issue, however, and I'd like to have it.
    >> >
    >> > The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >> > CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >> > 1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >> > tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >> > with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >> > everywhere in the US.

    >>
    >> Sprint natively uses only 1900 MHz. You can only roam where SprintPCS
    >> allows you to roam, not just anywhere.
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> > I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >> > tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >> > Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >> > an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >> > is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >> > signal that my Verizon phone would?

    >
    >Actually, with SPCS's newly issued PRL, if you were out of SPCS's coverage,
    >you could be roaming on 800 CDMA before 800 Analog. It all depends on who
    >the agreement is with.
    >>
    >> If SprintPCS has a roaming agreement with the same analog provider, then
    >> yes.
    >>
    >> > I understand that, all other things
    >> > being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >> > I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >> > importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.

    >>
    >> Everyplace is different depending on each companies roaming agreements.
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Obviously, the easy answer to this would be to try Sprint for 14 days
    >> > and see how I like it. Unfortunately, I'm on a family plan with 4
    >> > phones, so it would be a huge pain to try it, not like it, and go back
    >> > to Verizon.

    >
    >Well, you can try one phone on their new F & F plan, within the 14 day trial
    >period. If you find that it works for you, then you can decide whether you
    >want to port all your numbers off to SPCS.
    >> >
    >> > I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >> > companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >> > that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >> > changed?
    >> >

    >Yes, it has. SPCS has added a lot of towers in the LA, SF & SD metro areas.
    >We have a few folks who post here from the LA & SF areas, and all find
    >satisfactory coverage.
    >
    >> > Does anyone have any comments comparing the 1900 MHZ CDMA Sprint quality
    >> > with Verizon's 800 MHZ CDMA quality?

    >>
    >> All things being equal (and they never are), 800 MHz would be better;
    >> but you've already indicated you think SprintPCS has better coverage in
    >> your area.
    >> Your best bet is to borrow your daughter's friends' Sprint phone
    >> this weekend. Pay her $20 for the insult, it's a bargain to get good
    >> hands-on knowledge of how good SprintPCS would be for you.
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Thanks in advance,
    >> > Michael

    >
    >Anytime ... :)
    >
    >Bob
    >


    Deb
     
  8. On Tue, 08 Jun 2004 02:40:49 GMT, "Bob Smith"
    <usirsclt_No_Spam_@earthlink.net> wrote:


    >
    >I've noticed you've brought back that 1,400,000 number in the past two days.
    >So Phillipe, just where is that simple copy and paste, along with a page
    >number out of the 10Q. After 20 plus requests from quite a few people here,
    >including yours truly, you still haven't backed up your statement.


    I can't speak about the number of customers who have left, but
    according to the FCC 2003 posting of complaint statistics, Sprint PCS
    was second only to AT&T in the number of complaints per 10K users.

    http://www.consumersunion.org/pub/0511 FCC_Cell_ComplaintsAll3.pdf
    is the link to the graphic.

    AT&T wireless had 3.39 per 10K, Sprint had 2.25 per 10K with the other
    providers listed all having 1.6 or less.

    >
    >> I'd say borrow your daughter's friends Sprint phone this weekend.

    >
    >That would be a good idea, as long as she didn't need it and had the N & W
    >option on here account.
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> > I like Verizon very much-- had customer service issues with them in the
    >> > past, but they've been better this past year, and they work well for me
    >> > when I travel in Los Angeles, where I spend a lot of time, and in the
    >> > East Coast, where I often do work as well. Reception in my home is a
    >> > significant issue, however, and I'd like to have it.
    >> >
    >> > The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >> > CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >> > 1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >> > tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >> > with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >> > everywhere in the US.

    >>
    >> Sprint natively uses only 1900 MHz. You can only roam where SprintPCS
    >> allows you to roam, not just anywhere.
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> > I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >> > tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >> > Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >> > an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >> > is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >> > signal that my Verizon phone would?

    >
    >Actually, with SPCS's newly issued PRL, if you were out of SPCS's coverage,
    >you could be roaming on 800 CDMA before 800 Analog. It all depends on who
    >the agreement is with.
    >>
    >> If SprintPCS has a roaming agreement with the same analog provider, then
    >> yes.
    >>
    >> > I understand that, all other things
    >> > being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >> > I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >> > importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.

    >>
    >> Everyplace is different depending on each companies roaming agreements.
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Obviously, the easy answer to this would be to try Sprint for 14 days
    >> > and see how I like it. Unfortunately, I'm on a family plan with 4
    >> > phones, so it would be a huge pain to try it, not like it, and go back
    >> > to Verizon.

    >
    >Well, you can try one phone on their new F & F plan, within the 14 day trial
    >period. If you find that it works for you, then you can decide whether you
    >want to port all your numbers off to SPCS.
    >> >
    >> > I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >> > companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >> > that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >> > changed?
    >> >

    >Yes, it has. SPCS has added a lot of towers in the LA, SF & SD metro areas.
    >We have a few folks who post here from the LA & SF areas, and all find
    >satisfactory coverage.
    >
    >> > Does anyone have any comments comparing the 1900 MHZ CDMA Sprint quality
    >> > with Verizon's 800 MHZ CDMA quality?

    >>
    >> All things being equal (and they never are), 800 MHz would be better;
    >> but you've already indicated you think SprintPCS has better coverage in
    >> your area.
    >> Your best bet is to borrow your daughter's friends' Sprint phone
    >> this weekend. Pay her $20 for the insult, it's a bargain to get good
    >> hands-on knowledge of how good SprintPCS would be for you.
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Thanks in advance,
    >> > Michael

    >
    >Anytime ... :)
    >
    >Bob
    >


    Deb
     
  9. On Tue, 08 Jun 2004 02:40:49 GMT, "Bob Smith"
    <usirsclt_No_Spam_@earthlink.net> wrote:


    >
    >I've noticed you've brought back that 1,400,000 number in the past two days.
    >So Phillipe, just where is that simple copy and paste, along with a page
    >number out of the 10Q. After 20 plus requests from quite a few people here,
    >including yours truly, you still haven't backed up your statement.


    I can't speak about the number of customers who have left, but
    according to the FCC 2003 posting of complaint statistics, Sprint PCS
    was second only to AT&T in the number of complaints per 10K users.

    http://www.consumersunion.org/pub/0511 FCC_Cell_ComplaintsAll3.pdf
    is the link to the graphic.

    AT&T wireless had 3.39 per 10K, Sprint had 2.25 per 10K with the other
    providers listed all having 1.6 or less.

    >
    >> I'd say borrow your daughter's friends Sprint phone this weekend.

    >
    >That would be a good idea, as long as she didn't need it and had the N & W
    >option on here account.
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> > I like Verizon very much-- had customer service issues with them in the
    >> > past, but they've been better this past year, and they work well for me
    >> > when I travel in Los Angeles, where I spend a lot of time, and in the
    >> > East Coast, where I often do work as well. Reception in my home is a
    >> > significant issue, however, and I'd like to have it.
    >> >
    >> > The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >> > CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >> > 1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >> > tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >> > with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >> > everywhere in the US.

    >>
    >> Sprint natively uses only 1900 MHz. You can only roam where SprintPCS
    >> allows you to roam, not just anywhere.
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> > I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >> > tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >> > Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >> > an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >> > is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >> > signal that my Verizon phone would?

    >
    >Actually, with SPCS's newly issued PRL, if you were out of SPCS's coverage,
    >you could be roaming on 800 CDMA before 800 Analog. It all depends on who
    >the agreement is with.
    >>
    >> If SprintPCS has a roaming agreement with the same analog provider, then
    >> yes.
    >>
    >> > I understand that, all other things
    >> > being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >> > I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >> > importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.

    >>
    >> Everyplace is different depending on each companies roaming agreements.
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Obviously, the easy answer to this would be to try Sprint for 14 days
    >> > and see how I like it. Unfortunately, I'm on a family plan with 4
    >> > phones, so it would be a huge pain to try it, not like it, and go back
    >> > to Verizon.

    >
    >Well, you can try one phone on their new F & F plan, within the 14 day trial
    >period. If you find that it works for you, then you can decide whether you
    >want to port all your numbers off to SPCS.
    >> >
    >> > I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >> > companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >> > that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >> > changed?
    >> >

    >Yes, it has. SPCS has added a lot of towers in the LA, SF & SD metro areas.
    >We have a few folks who post here from the LA & SF areas, and all find
    >satisfactory coverage.
    >
    >> > Does anyone have any comments comparing the 1900 MHZ CDMA Sprint quality
    >> > with Verizon's 800 MHZ CDMA quality?

    >>
    >> All things being equal (and they never are), 800 MHz would be better;
    >> but you've already indicated you think SprintPCS has better coverage in
    >> your area.
    >> Your best bet is to borrow your daughter's friends' Sprint phone
    >> this weekend. Pay her $20 for the insult, it's a bargain to get good
    >> hands-on knowledge of how good SprintPCS would be for you.
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Thanks in advance,
    >> > Michael

    >
    >Anytime ... :)
    >
    >Bob
    >


    Deb
     
  10. On Tue, 08 Jun 2004 02:40:49 GMT, "Bob Smith"
    <usirsclt_No_Spam_@earthlink.net> wrote:


    >
    >I've noticed you've brought back that 1,400,000 number in the past two days.
    >So Phillipe, just where is that simple copy and paste, along with a page
    >number out of the 10Q. After 20 plus requests from quite a few people here,
    >including yours truly, you still haven't backed up your statement.


    I can't speak about the number of customers who have left, but
    according to the FCC 2003 posting of complaint statistics, Sprint PCS
    was second only to AT&T in the number of complaints per 10K users.

    http://www.consumersunion.org/pub/0511 FCC_Cell_ComplaintsAll3.pdf
    is the link to the graphic.

    AT&T wireless had 3.39 per 10K, Sprint had 2.25 per 10K with the other
    providers listed all having 1.6 or less.

    >
    >> I'd say borrow your daughter's friends Sprint phone this weekend.

    >
    >That would be a good idea, as long as she didn't need it and had the N & W
    >option on here account.
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> > I like Verizon very much-- had customer service issues with them in the
    >> > past, but they've been better this past year, and they work well for me
    >> > when I travel in Los Angeles, where I spend a lot of time, and in the
    >> > East Coast, where I often do work as well. Reception in my home is a
    >> > significant issue, however, and I'd like to have it.
    >> >
    >> > The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >> > CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >> > 1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >> > tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >> > with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >> > everywhere in the US.

    >>
    >> Sprint natively uses only 1900 MHz. You can only roam where SprintPCS
    >> allows you to roam, not just anywhere.
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> > I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >> > tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >> > Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >> > an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >> > is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >> > signal that my Verizon phone would?

    >
    >Actually, with SPCS's newly issued PRL, if you were out of SPCS's coverage,
    >you could be roaming on 800 CDMA before 800 Analog. It all depends on who
    >the agreement is with.
    >>
    >> If SprintPCS has a roaming agreement with the same analog provider, then
    >> yes.
    >>
    >> > I understand that, all other things
    >> > being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >> > I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >> > importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.

    >>
    >> Everyplace is different depending on each companies roaming agreements.
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Obviously, the easy answer to this would be to try Sprint for 14 days
    >> > and see how I like it. Unfortunately, I'm on a family plan with 4
    >> > phones, so it would be a huge pain to try it, not like it, and go back
    >> > to Verizon.

    >
    >Well, you can try one phone on their new F & F plan, within the 14 day trial
    >period. If you find that it works for you, then you can decide whether you
    >want to port all your numbers off to SPCS.
    >> >
    >> > I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >> > companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >> > that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >> > changed?
    >> >

    >Yes, it has. SPCS has added a lot of towers in the LA, SF & SD metro areas.
    >We have a few folks who post here from the LA & SF areas, and all find
    >satisfactory coverage.
    >
    >> > Does anyone have any comments comparing the 1900 MHZ CDMA Sprint quality
    >> > with Verizon's 800 MHZ CDMA quality?

    >>
    >> All things being equal (and they never are), 800 MHz would be better;
    >> but you've already indicated you think SprintPCS has better coverage in
    >> your area.
    >> Your best bet is to borrow your daughter's friends' Sprint phone
    >> this weekend. Pay her $20 for the insult, it's a bargain to get good
    >> hands-on knowledge of how good SprintPCS would be for you.
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Thanks in advance,
    >> > Michael

    >
    >Anytime ... :)
    >
    >Bob
    >


    Deb
     
  11. On Tue, 08 Jun 2004 02:40:49 GMT, "Bob Smith"
    <usirsclt_No_Spam_@earthlink.net> wrote:


    >
    >I've noticed you've brought back that 1,400,000 number in the past two days.
    >So Phillipe, just where is that simple copy and paste, along with a page
    >number out of the 10Q. After 20 plus requests from quite a few people here,
    >including yours truly, you still haven't backed up your statement.


    I can't speak about the number of customers who have left, but
    according to the FCC 2003 posting of complaint statistics, Sprint PCS
    was second only to AT&T in the number of complaints per 10K users.

    http://www.consumersunion.org/pub/0511 FCC_Cell_ComplaintsAll3.pdf
    is the link to the graphic.

    AT&T wireless had 3.39 per 10K, Sprint had 2.25 per 10K with the other
    providers listed all having 1.6 or less.

    >
    >> I'd say borrow your daughter's friends Sprint phone this weekend.

    >
    >That would be a good idea, as long as she didn't need it and had the N & W
    >option on here account.
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> > I like Verizon very much-- had customer service issues with them in the
    >> > past, but they've been better this past year, and they work well for me
    >> > when I travel in Los Angeles, where I spend a lot of time, and in the
    >> > East Coast, where I often do work as well. Reception in my home is a
    >> > significant issue, however, and I'd like to have it.
    >> >
    >> > The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >> > CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >> > 1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >> > tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >> > with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >> > everywhere in the US.

    >>
    >> Sprint natively uses only 1900 MHz. You can only roam where SprintPCS
    >> allows you to roam, not just anywhere.
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> > I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >> > tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >> > Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >> > an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >> > is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >> > signal that my Verizon phone would?

    >
    >Actually, with SPCS's newly issued PRL, if you were out of SPCS's coverage,
    >you could be roaming on 800 CDMA before 800 Analog. It all depends on who
    >the agreement is with.
    >>
    >> If SprintPCS has a roaming agreement with the same analog provider, then
    >> yes.
    >>
    >> > I understand that, all other things
    >> > being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >> > I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >> > importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.

    >>
    >> Everyplace is different depending on each companies roaming agreements.
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Obviously, the easy answer to this would be to try Sprint for 14 days
    >> > and see how I like it. Unfortunately, I'm on a family plan with 4
    >> > phones, so it would be a huge pain to try it, not like it, and go back
    >> > to Verizon.

    >
    >Well, you can try one phone on their new F & F plan, within the 14 day trial
    >period. If you find that it works for you, then you can decide whether you
    >want to port all your numbers off to SPCS.
    >> >
    >> > I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >> > companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >> > that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >> > changed?
    >> >

    >Yes, it has. SPCS has added a lot of towers in the LA, SF & SD metro areas.
    >We have a few folks who post here from the LA & SF areas, and all find
    >satisfactory coverage.
    >
    >> > Does anyone have any comments comparing the 1900 MHZ CDMA Sprint quality
    >> > with Verizon's 800 MHZ CDMA quality?

    >>
    >> All things being equal (and they never are), 800 MHz would be better;
    >> but you've already indicated you think SprintPCS has better coverage in
    >> your area.
    >> Your best bet is to borrow your daughter's friends' Sprint phone
    >> this weekend. Pay her $20 for the insult, it's a bargain to get good
    >> hands-on knowledge of how good SprintPCS would be for you.
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Thanks in advance,
    >> > Michael

    >
    >Anytime ... :)
    >
    >Bob
    >


    Deb
     
  12. On Tue, 08 Jun 2004 02:40:49 GMT, "Bob Smith"
    <usirsclt_No_Spam_@earthlink.net> wrote:


    >
    >I've noticed you've brought back that 1,400,000 number in the past two days.
    >So Phillipe, just where is that simple copy and paste, along with a page
    >number out of the 10Q. After 20 plus requests from quite a few people here,
    >including yours truly, you still haven't backed up your statement.


    I can't speak about the number of customers who have left, but
    according to the FCC 2003 posting of complaint statistics, Sprint PCS
    was second only to AT&T in the number of complaints per 10K users.

    http://www.consumersunion.org/pub/0511 FCC_Cell_ComplaintsAll3.pdf
    is the link to the graphic.

    AT&T wireless had 3.39 per 10K, Sprint had 2.25 per 10K with the other
    providers listed all having 1.6 or less.

    >
    >> I'd say borrow your daughter's friends Sprint phone this weekend.

    >
    >That would be a good idea, as long as she didn't need it and had the N & W
    >option on here account.
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> > I like Verizon very much-- had customer service issues with them in the
    >> > past, but they've been better this past year, and they work well for me
    >> > when I travel in Los Angeles, where I spend a lot of time, and in the
    >> > East Coast, where I often do work as well. Reception in my home is a
    >> > significant issue, however, and I'd like to have it.
    >> >
    >> > The sales rep at Radio Shack pointed out that Sprint, like Verizon, is a
    >> > CDMA system and that many Sprint phones are tri-mode. I've read that
    >> > 1900 MHZ systems are not as good as 800 Mhz, but he pointed out that the
    >> > tri-mode Sprint phones are 1900, 800, and analogue, and he said that
    >> > with Sprint's Expanded Voice Coverage, a Sprint phone can roam nearly
    >> > everywhere in the US.

    >>
    >> Sprint natively uses only 1900 MHz. You can only roam where SprintPCS
    >> allows you to roam, not just anywhere.
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> > I have a few technical questions about that: does that mean that a
    >> > tri-mode Sprint phone would pick up the SAME analogue signal as my
    >> > Verizon phone in the outer reaches of Marin, where I sometimes rely on
    >> > an analogue signal? Does that mean that when a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal
    >> > is not reaching my phone when I travel, it will pick up the same 800 MHZ
    >> > signal that my Verizon phone would?

    >
    >Actually, with SPCS's newly issued PRL, if you were out of SPCS's coverage,
    >you could be roaming on 800 CDMA before 800 Analog. It all depends on who
    >the agreement is with.
    >>
    >> If SprintPCS has a roaming agreement with the same analog provider, then
    >> yes.
    >>
    >> > I understand that, all other things
    >> > being equal, the Sprint phone will default to a 1900 MHZ Sprint signal;
    >> > I'm just not clear what happens when roaming on Sprint and, more
    >> > importantly, how it would compare with Verizon.

    >>
    >> Everyplace is different depending on each companies roaming agreements.
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Obviously, the easy answer to this would be to try Sprint for 14 days
    >> > and see how I like it. Unfortunately, I'm on a family plan with 4
    >> > phones, so it would be a huge pain to try it, not like it, and go back
    >> > to Verizon.

    >
    >Well, you can try one phone on their new F & F plan, within the 14 day trial
    >period. If you find that it works for you, then you can decide whether you
    >want to port all your numbers off to SPCS.
    >> >
    >> > I must say I haven't heard much good about Sprint in the past, but these
    >> > companies change all the time. Any opinions? I remember in particular
    >> > that Sprint had weak coverage in the Los Angeles area. Has that
    >> > changed?
    >> >

    >Yes, it has. SPCS has added a lot of towers in the LA, SF & SD metro areas.
    >We have a few folks who post here from the LA & SF areas, and all find
    >satisfactory coverage.
    >
    >> > Does anyone have any comments comparing the 1900 MHZ CDMA Sprint quality
    >> > with Verizon's 800 MHZ CDMA quality?

    >>
    >> All things being equal (and they never are), 800 MHz would be better;
    >> but you've already indicated you think SprintPCS has better coverage in
    >> your area.
    >> Your best bet is to borrow your daughter's friends' Sprint phone
    >> this weekend. Pay her $20 for the insult, it's a bargain to get good
    >> hands-on knowledge of how good SprintPCS would be for you.
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Thanks in advance,
    >> > Michael

    >
    >Anytime ... :)
    >
    >Bob
    >


    Deb
     
  13. On Wed, 09 Jun 2004 03:13:49 GMT, O/Siris <0siris@sprîntpcs.com>
    wrote:

    >> Sprint natively uses only 1900 MHz. You can only roam where SprintPCS
    >> allows you to roam, not just anywhere.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >???
    >
    >Aside from some really small regional carriers, we've got roaming
    >agreements that cover 97% of the entire land area of the country.


    Other than many 'dead' areas, I have to say that if there is a signal
    at all, I can get roaming service when not on the PCS network.
    However, that also means I pay roaming charges, and that happens in
    far too many metropolitan areas for a "nationwide, no roaming
    network".


    Deb
     
  14. On Wed, 09 Jun 2004 03:13:49 GMT, O/Siris <0siris@sprîntpcs.com>
    wrote:

    >> Sprint natively uses only 1900 MHz. You can only roam where SprintPCS
    >> allows you to roam, not just anywhere.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >???
    >
    >Aside from some really small regional carriers, we've got roaming
    >agreements that cover 97% of the entire land area of the country.


    Other than many 'dead' areas, I have to say that if there is a signal
    at all, I can get roaming service when not on the PCS network.
    However, that also means I pay roaming charges, and that happens in
    far too many metropolitan areas for a "nationwide, no roaming
    network".


    Deb
     
  15. On Wed, 09 Jun 2004 03:13:49 GMT, O/Siris <0siris@sprîntpcs.com>
    wrote:

    >> Sprint natively uses only 1900 MHz. You can only roam where SprintPCS
    >> allows you to roam, not just anywhere.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >???
    >
    >Aside from some really small regional carriers, we've got roaming
    >agreements that cover 97% of the entire land area of the country.


    Other than many 'dead' areas, I have to say that if there is a signal
    at all, I can get roaming service when not on the PCS network.
    However, that also means I pay roaming charges, and that happens in
    far too many metropolitan areas for a "nationwide, no roaming
    network".


    Deb
     
  16. On Wed, 09 Jun 2004 03:13:49 GMT, O/Siris <0siris@sprîntpcs.com>
    wrote:

    >> Sprint natively uses only 1900 MHz. You can only roam where SprintPCS
    >> allows you to roam, not just anywhere.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >???
    >
    >Aside from some really small regional carriers, we've got roaming
    >agreements that cover 97% of the entire land area of the country.


    Other than many 'dead' areas, I have to say that if there is a signal
    at all, I can get roaming service when not on the PCS network.
    However, that also means I pay roaming charges, and that happens in
    far too many metropolitan areas for a "nationwide, no roaming
    network".


    Deb
     
  17. On Wed, 09 Jun 2004 03:13:49 GMT, O/Siris <0siris@sprîntpcs.com>
    wrote:

    >> Sprint natively uses only 1900 MHz. You can only roam where SprintPCS
    >> allows you to roam, not just anywhere.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >???
    >
    >Aside from some really small regional carriers, we've got roaming
    >agreements that cover 97% of the entire land area of the country.


    Other than many 'dead' areas, I have to say that if there is a signal
    at all, I can get roaming service when not on the PCS network.
    However, that also means I pay roaming charges, and that happens in
    far too many metropolitan areas for a "nationwide, no roaming
    network".


    Deb
     
  18. On Wed, 09 Jun 2004 03:13:49 GMT, O/Siris <0siris@sprîntpcs.com>
    wrote:

    >> Sprint natively uses only 1900 MHz. You can only roam where SprintPCS
    >> allows you to roam, not just anywhere.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >???
    >
    >Aside from some really small regional carriers, we've got roaming
    >agreements that cover 97% of the entire land area of the country.


    Other than many 'dead' areas, I have to say that if there is a signal
    at all, I can get roaming service when not on the PCS network.
    However, that also means I pay roaming charges, and that happens in
    far too many metropolitan areas for a "nationwide, no roaming
    network".


    Deb
     
  19. On Wed, 09 Jun 2004 03:13:49 GMT, O/Siris <0siris@sprîntpcs.com>
    wrote:

    >> Sprint natively uses only 1900 MHz. You can only roam where SprintPCS
    >> allows you to roam, not just anywhere.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >???
    >
    >Aside from some really small regional carriers, we've got roaming
    >agreements that cover 97% of the entire land area of the country.


    Other than many 'dead' areas, I have to say that if there is a signal
    at all, I can get roaming service when not on the PCS network.
    However, that also means I pay roaming charges, and that happens in
    far too many metropolitan areas for a "nationwide, no roaming
    network".


    Deb
     
  20. On Wed, 09 Jun 2004 03:13:49 GMT, O/Siris <0siris@sprîntpcs.com>
    wrote:

    >> Sprint natively uses only 1900 MHz. You can only roam where SprintPCS
    >> allows you to roam, not just anywhere.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >???
    >
    >Aside from some really small regional carriers, we've got roaming
    >agreements that cover 97% of the entire land area of the country.


    Other than many 'dead' areas, I have to say that if there is a signal
    at all, I can get roaming service when not on the PCS network.
    However, that also means I pay roaming charges, and that happens in
    far too many metropolitan areas for a "nationwide, no roaming
    network".


    Deb
     

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