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The great iPhone hunt of 2007

Discussion in 'alt.cellular.verizon' started by Lex, Jun 16, 2007.

  1. Lex

    Lex Guest

    http://tech.msn.com/products/articlecnet.aspx?cp-documentid=5013198&GT1=10138

    The great iPhone hunt of 2007
    By Anne Broache, Staff Writer, CNET News.com

    Apple CEO Steve Jobs recently gave free advice to a columnist asking how to
    get an iPhone when they go on sale: head to an AT&T store, Jobs suggested,
    rather than Apple's own retail outlets.

    A CNET News.com survey of 75 Apple and AT&T stores indicates that may be a
    wise approach.

    Not one Apple store contacted offered would-be iPhone buyers the chance to
    get on a waiting list, but some AT&T stores and retailers did. The catch:
    not all stores that sell AT&T phones expect to be selling the iPhone on
    June 29, and some that will expressed concern about receiving sufficient
    quantities of the highly anticipated device.

    An AT&T-owned store in Times Square in midtown Manhattan, for instance,
    said that about 100 people had been placed on a waiting list. When asked
    whether being on that list guarantees priority for buying an iPhone, a
    store employee replied, "It depends how accessible you make yourself. I'm
    going to call you. If you're here, you'll get it."

    One open question is whether AT&T/Cingular franchises and resellers will
    ever be selling the iPhone. (Because exclusive Cingular agents have signs
    and decor that looked just like company-owned stores, it hasn't been easy
    to tell them apart. But as of a few weeks ago, locally owned stores are now
    called AT&T authorized retailers and are labeled as such in the company's
    online directory.)

    AT&T spokesman John Kampfe initially denied on Tuesday that any franchises
    or resellers would receive iPhones. "The iPhone will be available in all
    AT&T-owned retail stores nationwide, which number about 1,800. Again it
    will be sold only in AT&T-owned retail stores, Apple retail stores and
    through Apple's online store," Kampfe said in an e-mail interview.

    But in the News.com survey, some franchises have said the opposite: that
    they expect to supply customers with iPhones starting June 29. Others,
    however, have said they're not getting the product at all; some say they're
    unsure whether they'll stock them; and some said that if they did, the
    phones would likely not arrive until at least July.

    A Manhattan AT&T franchise on Third Avenue said on Tuesday that it's also
    expecting the phone on June 29 but did not have a waiting list. In Miami,
    an employee at an AT&T franchise on Dixie Highway said she had 16 people on
    a waiting list for the 15 phones expected in the first shipment and would
    continue taking names for the next batch of 15 phones. Those are expected
    to arrive two weeks later.

    In a follow-up conversation, AT&T's Kampfe indicated that franchises might
    be able to start selling phones after June 29. "We haven't disclosed what
    we're doing beyond the 29th," he said. "That's not to say we are going to
    make them available, but as of the 29th, it is only going to be in
    AT&T-owned stores, Apple stores, and Apple online."

    Some other tidbits that surfaced in the survey:

    • When asked whether it was possible to get on a waiting list or preorder
    the iPhone, many AT&T store representatives cited an internal company
    memorandum barring both practices. But AT&T's Kampfe said he could not
    confirm or comment on the existence of such a policy. "Our policy is that
    it is going to be sold on the day--no advance sales or anything of that
    nature," he told CNET News.com in a phone interview.

    • In San Francisco, an AT&T franchise store on Chestnut Street said it had
    assembled a waiting list of sorts, but "maxed out" about two weeks ago and
    would no longer be adding names to the list. That store said it expected to
    receive about 30 iPhones, but most likely not until at least a few days
    after the projected launch date. Five more stores in San Francisco, most of
    them AT&T-owned, said they weren't taking preorders or starting waiting
    lists, as did the downtown Apple store. Another franchise on Kearny Street
    said it wasn't stocking the phone at all.

    • Two stores in the Los Angeles area, which appeared from their directory
    listing to be AT&T-owned, said they were taking down names for an informal
    waiting list, but they couldn't guarantee that those on the list would
    actually get their hands on the first crop of phones. (Three other area
    stores, however, declined such requests at all.)

    • Very few employees at AT&T or Apple stores had the faintest idea how many
    phones their stores will stock, with many of them blaming that lack of
    information on secrecy from the corporate powers at Apple.

    • But some were more optimistic than others about the quantities. A Miami
    Beach Apple store employee enthusiastically predicted that there would be
    "enough" for everyone who wanted one, while an Apple store employee in
    Cambridge, Mass., said she'd heard "good numbers" of iPhones would be
    available at her location. A Salt Lake City Apple store employee, for his
    part, couldn't be more specific than "a bunch." Estimates by some AT&T
    store employees were more conservative, however. Employees at company-owned
    stores in downtown San Francisco and Tampa, Fla., admitted they were
    expecting only a "limited" number, at least at first.

    • The cube-shaped Apple store on New York's Fifth Avenue may be open for
    business 24 hours a day, but a representative who answered the phone
    chuckled (knowingly?) when asked whether that location would begin selling
    the phones at midnight on June 29. Apple hasn't told the store anything
    about that, she said.

    • At Apple's Salt Lake City outpost, an employee said he had heard buzz
    about a midnight launch party, but knew only one thing for certain: come
    June 29, there was sure to be a line going out the door. Almost every
    customer that walks into the store asks about the iPhone, he said.

    • An Omaha, Neb., Apple store employee said he fully expected to see people
    camping outside before the launch, while a Portland, Ore. employee actually
    advised doing so: "I recommend pitching a tent," he said, perhaps only half
    kidding.


    Tips for landing an iPhone

    • Log on to Apple's Web-based store on June 29. The phone is set to go on
    sale at 6 p.m. that day, Jobs announced. Sign up for updates here. But
    forget trying AT&T's e-commerce site; the company says it won't be selling
    iPhones online, at least initially.

    • Call a few local AT&T stores and see if you can get on their waiting
    lists or if your local sales representative has any tips about how that
    particular store is handling requests. Most will tell you it's all
    first-come, first-served, but practices appear to vary widely.

    • Show up early at an Apple store or company-owned AT&T store before they
    open on June 29. Most stores say they will be keeping normal hours that
    day, although midnight parties at Apple stores don't appear to be
    completely ruled out. The big question is how many phones each store will
    stock.

    • Wait until the June 29 mania dies down and hope that AT&T and Apple
    decide to allow locally owned AT&T franchises and resellers to carry the
    product as well. More locations should mean more units--and shorter lines.
     



    › See More: The great iPhone hunt of 2007
  2. Jeanette

    Jeanette Guest

    If someone told me in 1977 that in 2007 people would wait in line to buy
    a telephone I would have told them your crazy.


    Lex wrote:
    > http://tech.msn.com/products/articlecnet.aspx?cp-documentid=5013198&GT1=10138
    >
    > The great iPhone hunt of 2007
    > By Anne Broache, Staff Writer, CNET News.com
    >
    > Apple CEO Steve Jobs recently gave free advice to a columnist asking how to
    > get an iPhone when they go on sale: head to an AT&T store, Jobs suggested,
    > rather than Apple's own retail outlets.
    >
    > A CNET News.com survey of 75 Apple and AT&T stores indicates that may be a
    > wise approach.
    >
    > Not one Apple store contacted offered would-be iPhone buyers the chance to
    > get on a waiting list, but some AT&T stores and retailers did. The catch:
    > not all stores that sell AT&T phones expect to be selling the iPhone on
    > June 29, and some that will expressed concern about receiving sufficient
    > quantities of the highly anticipated device.
    >
    > An AT&T-owned store in Times Square in midtown Manhattan, for instance,
    > said that about 100 people had been placed on a waiting list. When asked
    > whether being on that list guarantees priority for buying an iPhone, a
    > store employee replied, "It depends how accessible you make yourself. I'm
    > going to call you. If you're here, you'll get it."
    >
    > One open question is whether AT&T/Cingular franchises and resellers will
    > ever be selling the iPhone. (Because exclusive Cingular agents have signs
    > and decor that looked just like company-owned stores, it hasn't been easy
    > to tell them apart. But as of a few weeks ago, locally owned stores are now
    > called AT&T authorized retailers and are labeled as such in the company's
    > online directory.)
    >
    > AT&T spokesman John Kampfe initially denied on Tuesday that any franchises
    > or resellers would receive iPhones. "The iPhone will be available in all
    > AT&T-owned retail stores nationwide, which number about 1,800. Again it
    > will be sold only in AT&T-owned retail stores, Apple retail stores and
    > through Apple's online store," Kampfe said in an e-mail interview.
    >
    > But in the News.com survey, some franchises have said the opposite: that
    > they expect to supply customers with iPhones starting June 29. Others,
    > however, have said they're not getting the product at all; some say they're
    > unsure whether they'll stock them; and some said that if they did, the
    > phones would likely not arrive until at least July.
    >
    > A Manhattan AT&T franchise on Third Avenue said on Tuesday that it's also
    > expecting the phone on June 29 but did not have a waiting list. In Miami,
    > an employee at an AT&T franchise on Dixie Highway said she had 16 people on
    > a waiting list for the 15 phones expected in the first shipment and would
    > continue taking names for the next batch of 15 phones. Those are expected
    > to arrive two weeks later.
    >
    > In a follow-up conversation, AT&T's Kampfe indicated that franchises might
    > be able to start selling phones after June 29. "We haven't disclosed what
    > we're doing beyond the 29th," he said. "That's not to say we are going to
    > make them available, but as of the 29th, it is only going to be in
    > AT&T-owned stores, Apple stores, and Apple online."
    >
    > Some other tidbits that surfaced in the survey:
    >
    > • When asked whether it was possible to get on a waiting list or preorder
    > the iPhone, many AT&T store representatives cited an internal company
    > memorandum barring both practices. But AT&T's Kampfe said he could not
    > confirm or comment on the existence of such a policy. "Our policy is that
    > it is going to be sold on the day--no advance sales or anything of that
    > nature," he told CNET News.com in a phone interview.
    >
    > • In San Francisco, an AT&T franchise store on Chestnut Street said it had
    > assembled a waiting list of sorts, but "maxed out" about two weeks ago and
    > would no longer be adding names to the list. That store said it expected to
    > receive about 30 iPhones, but most likely not until at least a few days
    > after the projected launch date. Five more stores in San Francisco, most of
    > them AT&T-owned, said they weren't taking preorders or starting waiting
    > lists, as did the downtown Apple store. Another franchise on Kearny Street
    > said it wasn't stocking the phone at all.
    >
    > • Two stores in the Los Angeles area, which appeared from their directory
    > listing to be AT&T-owned, said they were taking down names for an informal
    > waiting list, but they couldn't guarantee that those on the list would
    > actually get their hands on the first crop of phones. (Three other area
    > stores, however, declined such requests at all.)
    >
    > • Very few employees at AT&T or Apple stores had the faintest idea how many
    > phones their stores will stock, with many of them blaming that lack of
    > information on secrecy from the corporate powers at Apple.
    >
    > • But some were more optimistic than others about the quantities. A Miami
    > Beach Apple store employee enthusiastically predicted that there would be
    > "enough" for everyone who wanted one, while an Apple store employee in
    > Cambridge, Mass., said she'd heard "good numbers" of iPhones would be
    > available at her location. A Salt Lake City Apple store employee, for his
    > part, couldn't be more specific than "a bunch." Estimates by some AT&T
    > store employees were more conservative, however. Employees at company-owned
    > stores in downtown San Francisco and Tampa, Fla., admitted they were
    > expecting only a "limited" number, at least at first.
    >
    > • The cube-shaped Apple store on New York's Fifth Avenue may be open for
    > business 24 hours a day, but a representative who answered the phone
    > chuckled (knowingly?) when asked whether that location would begin selling
    > the phones at midnight on June 29. Apple hasn't told the store anything
    > about that, she said.
    >
    > • At Apple's Salt Lake City outpost, an employee said he had heard buzz
    > about a midnight launch party, but knew only one thing for certain: come
    > June 29, there was sure to be a line going out the door. Almost every
    > customer that walks into the store asks about the iPhone, he said.
    >
    > • An Omaha, Neb., Apple store employee said he fully expected to see people
    > camping outside before the launch, while a Portland, Ore. employee actually
    > advised doing so: "I recommend pitching a tent," he said, perhaps only half
    > kidding.
    >
    >
    > Tips for landing an iPhone
    >
    > • Log on to Apple's Web-based store on June 29. The phone is set to go on
    > sale at 6 p.m. that day, Jobs announced. Sign up for updates here. But
    > forget trying AT&T's e-commerce site; the company says it won't be selling
    > iPhones online, at least initially.
    >
    > • Call a few local AT&T stores and see if you can get on their waiting
    > lists or if your local sales representative has any tips about how that
    > particular store is handling requests. Most will tell you it's all
    > first-come, first-served, but practices appear to vary widely.
    >
    > • Show up early at an Apple store or company-owned AT&T store before they
    > open on June 29. Most stores say they will be keeping normal hours that
    > day, although midnight parties at Apple stores don't appear to be
    > completely ruled out. The big question is how many phones each store will
    > stock.
    >
    > • Wait until the June 29 mania dies down and hope that AT&T and Apple
    > decide to allow locally owned AT&T franchises and resellers to carry the
    > product as well. More locations should mean more units--and shorter lines.
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
  3. Hadron Quark

    Hadron Quark Guest

    Jeanette <jrusso2@hotmail.com> writes:

    > If someone told me in 1977 that in 2007 people would wait in line to
    > buy a telephone I would have told them your crazy.


    Why would you tell them that Lex was crazy? (Assuming you meant "you're").
     
  4. Larry

    Larry Guest

    lex@afutureweb.com (Lex) wrote in news:HNKWEFW739249.4217592593
    @anonymous.poster:

    > Tips for landing an iPhone
    >


    People have just GOT to be NUTS! There's no other way to explain their
    stupidity being lead around like dogs on a leash....by the ad hypers.

    I just hope the iphone doesn't suck as bad as the ipod does, and always
    has.....

    Larry
    --
    How silly......
     
  5. Geoff  Miller

    Geoff Miller Guest

    Larry <noone@home.com> writes:

    > I just hope the iphone doesn't suck as bad as the ipod does,
    > and always has.....



    Yeah, it's got to suck, considering how many of them have been
    sold.

    What I don't understand about the whole iPod/Walkman/Discman
    phenomenon is why so many people feel the need to listen to
    music so much of the time. Personally, I find music distrac-
    ting when I'm trying to concentrate on something else. And
    even when I'm not concentrating on anything in particular, I'm
    usually quite content just to think.



    Geoff

    --
    "Hell has no fury like a pacifist." -- Pete Stickney
     
  6. George Kerby

    George Kerby Guest

    On 6/16/07 3:03 PM, in article TlXci.1000$nQ5.583@bignews2.bellsouth.net,
    "William Michael Greene" <wmg63@bellsouth.net> wrote:

    > iPod sucks?
    >
    > Strange!
    >
    >

    Some folks see a green sky...
     
  7. Geoff  Miller

    Geoff Miller Guest

    Elmo P. Shagnasty <elmop@nastydesigns.com> writes:

    [iPods]

    : Yeah, it's got to suck, considering how many of them have been
    : sold.

    > Just because everyone else is doing it, doesn't mean it makes sense.



    Its making sense or not isn't the point. Its not sucking is the point.

    What better evidence of a consumer product's not sucking could there
    possibly be than the fact that a shitload of them have been sold?

    And why _would_ the iPod suck, exactly? What is it that you don't
    like?



    Geoff

    --
    "Hell has no fury like a pacifist." -- Pete Stickney
     
  8. George

    George Guest

    Geoff Miller wrote:
    > Larry <noone@home.com> writes:
    >
    >> I just hope the iphone doesn't suck as bad as the ipod does,
    >> and always has.....

    >
    >
    > Yeah, it's got to suck, considering how many of them have been
    > sold.
    >
    > What I don't understand about the whole iPod/Walkman/Discman
    > phenomenon is why so many people feel the need to listen to
    > music so much of the time. Personally, I find music distrac-
    > ting when I'm trying to concentrate on something else. And
    > even when I'm not concentrating on anything in particular, I'm
    > usually quite content just to think.
    >
    >
    >

    I also shake my head at that. I also don't understand the need to get on
    your growling quad and race through the forest to "enjoy nature".
     
  9. Bert Hyman

    Bert Hyman Guest

    In news:137ah3k7df60aaf@corp.supernews.com geoffm@lava.net (Geoff
    Miller) wrote:

    > What I don't understand about the whole iPod/Walkman/Discman
    > phenomenon is why so many people feel the need to listen to
    > music so much of the time.


    Since this is cross-posted to a couple of cellphone-related newsgroups,
    I guess it's OK for me to express my curiosity about why so many
    people feel the need to be on the phone talking to somebody so much of
    the time.

    Kids I can understand; hanging on the landline phone was common long
    before the advent of the cellphone.

    Adults however, they're a different story, aren't they?

    --
    Bert Hyman St. Paul, MN bert@iphouse.com
     
  10. Geoff  Miller

    Geoff Miller Guest

    Elmo P. Shagnasty <elmop@nastydesigns.com> writes:

    : Its making sense or not isn't the point. Its not sucking is the point.

    > OK...just because everyone else is doing it, doesn't mean it doesn't
    > suck.



    Of course it does. Consumer products that suck don't sell in vast
    numbers like iPods do.

    And you never did tell me *why* you insist that iPods suck.



    Geoff

    --
    "Hell has no fury like a pacifist." -- Pete Stickney
     
  11. Kier

    Kier Guest

    On Sun, 17 Jun 2007 14:25:56 +0000, Geoff Miller wrote:

    >
    >
    > Larry <noone@home.com> writes:
    >
    >> I just hope the iphone doesn't suck as bad as the ipod does,
    >> and always has.....

    >
    >
    > Yeah, it's got to suck, considering how many of them have been
    > sold.


    I certainly don't think the iPod sucks. They're extremely well-designed
    items, very attractive physically, and easy to use. My brother just bought
    himself a video iPod. But my own preference is the Archos series of media
    players. They're not as pretty, and the controls are somewhat clunky, but
    they're great players.

    >
    > What I don't understand about the whole iPod/Walkman/Discman
    > phenomenon is why so many people feel the need to listen to
    > music so much of the time. Personally, I find music distrac-
    > ting when I'm trying to concentrate on something else. And
    > even when I'm not concentrating on anything in particular, I'm
    > usually quite content just to think.


    Depending on circumstance, I find music helps the thought process. As I
    don't drive, I travel on buses a fair bit, and the combination of riding
    the bus and listening to music really helps my imagination to flow freely.

    Other times, I just like to listen to the world go by. It depends on mood.
    Riding in a car, for instance, seems to demand music (usually rock or
    metal of some sort.

    But as you say, not everyone likes to have a soundtrack in their daily
    lives. Maybe it's something to do with watching so many films and TV
    shows where all the action takes place to a thumping beat; perhaps we've
    subconsciously come to believe that's how life should be too.

    (follow-ups set to COLA, as I don't read the other groups)

    --
    Kier
     
  12. Geoff  Miller

    Geoff Miller Guest

    Elmo P. Shagnasty <elmop@nastydesigns.com> writes:

    : What better evidence of a consumer product's not sucking could there
    : possibly be than the fact that a shitload of them have been sold?

    > Microsoft Windows.


    > 'Nuff said.



    Not so fast.

    Windows works just fine for most people most of the time. That's
    why it sells as well as it does, and it's why it doesn't suck.
    Not that there aren't better O/S's out there. But do Chevies suck
    because they aren't Lexuses? Of course not. They and their
    equivalents are perfectly satisfactory for most people most of the
    time, and are cost-effective in the bargain.

    I'm using Windows XP Home Edition right now, in fact, and I'm quite
    happy with it. I also run XP Professioal on my company-provided
    laptop; it also works more than adequately well. And being a UNIX
    system administrator, I do have a basis for comparison.



    Geoff

    --
    "Hell has no fury like a pacifist." -- Pete Stickney
     
  13. Notan

    Notan Guest

    Geoff Miller wrote:
    > Larry <noone@home.com> writes:
    >
    >> I just hope the iphone doesn't suck as bad as the ipod does,
    >> and always has.....

    >
    >
    > Yeah, it's got to suck, considering how many of them have been
    > sold.
    >
    > What I don't understand about the whole iPod/Walkman/Discman
    > phenomenon is why so many people feel the need to listen to
    > music so much of the time. Personally, I find music distrac-
    > ting when I'm trying to concentrate on something else. And
    > even when I'm not concentrating on anything in particular, I'm
    > usually quite content just to think.


    I'm with you, but what *really* kills me is people requesting
    different screen savers for their cell phones... Does it get
    *any* more mindless!!! <g>

    --
    Notan
     
  14. Kier

    Kier Guest

    On Sun, 17 Jun 2007 11:11:06 -0400, Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

    > In article <137ajbi3c0ojta5@corp.supernews.com>,
    > geoffm@lava.net (Geoff Miller) wrote:
    >
    >> > Just because everyone else is doing it, doesn't mean it makes sense.

    >>
    >>
    >> Its making sense or not isn't the point. Its not sucking is the point.
    >>
    >> What better evidence of a consumer product's not sucking could there
    >> possibly be than the fact that a shitload of them have been sold?

    >
    > Microsoft Windows.
    >
    > 'Nuff said.


    The iPod is hardware, though, not software.

    --
    Kier
     
  15. Geoff  Miller

    Geoff Miller Guest

    Justin <nospam@insightbb.com> writes:

    > To keep other noises out, to keep entertained going to and from
    > locations, to listen to things beside music. Look at the podcast
    > community.



    Admittedly, podcasts are something that intrgues me more and more.



    Geoff

    --
    "Hell has no fury like a pacifist." -- Pete Stickney
     
  16. aemeijers

    aemeijers Guest

    "Kier" <vallon@tiscali.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:pan.2007.06.17.16.42.20.152114@tiscali.co.uk...
    > On Sun, 17 Jun 2007 15:14:13 +0000, Bert Hyman wrote:
    >
    >> In news:137ah3k7df60aaf@corp.supernews.com geoffm@lava.net (Geoff
    >> Miller) wrote:
    >>
    >>> What I don't understand about the whole iPod/Walkman/Discman
    >>> phenomenon is why so many people feel the need to listen to
    >>> music so much of the time.

    >>
    >> Since this is cross-posted to a couple of cellphone-related newsgroups,
    >> I guess it's OK for me to express my curiosity about why so many
    >> people feel the need to be on the phone talking to somebody so much of
    >> the time.

    >
    > Hey, don't feel you have to excuse getting into this.
    >
    >>
    >> Kids I can understand; hanging on the landline phone was common long
    >> before the advent of the cellphone.
    >>
    >> Adults however, they're a different story, aren't they?

    >
    > Personally, I don't realy enjoy talking on the phone. I like to speak to
    > people I can see.
    >
    > I suppose it's just an extension of the usual yakking everyone does, not
    > just kids, this new trend. Gues I must be just an old dinosaur type.
    >

    Chuckle. The one that makes me shake my head is people yakking on cells in
    the frigging grocery store. Not 'honey, what was that you told me not to
    forget?' calls, just yakking. Can they not go 20 ninutes with only their own
    thoughts, paying attention to the task at hand?

    aem sends....
     
  17. Kier

    Kier Guest

    On Sun, 17 Jun 2007 15:13:58 +0000, Geoff Miller wrote:

    >
    >
    > Kier <vallon@tiscali.co.uk> writes:
    >
    > : Yeah, it's got to suck, considering how many of them have been
    > : sold.
    >
    >> I certainly don't think the iPod sucks.

    >
    > I was being sarcastic.


    Yeah, I did get that :)

    >
    >
    >> They're extremely well-designed items, very attractive physically,
    >> and easy to use.

    >
    > I think so, too. I personally don't care to own one, but I can
    > appreciate the quality of their conception and design.


    Likewise.

    >
    >
    >> Depending on circumstance, I find music helps the thought process.
    >> As I don't drive, I travel on buses a fair bit, and the combination
    >> of riding the bus and listening to music really helps my imagination
    >> to flow freely.

    >
    > I can see how that would be true when using public transportation.


    Cuts out peole nattering, for one. I don't mind hearing the conversations
    of others, but they distract me, as I start following along, getting
    interested in what they're talking about <grin>

    >
    > Driving a car is different, at least to me. Music once in a while
    > is good. Mostly, though, I find it distracting. I'm usually happy
    > just to listen to the sound of the wind and the tires. I don't
    > understand people who have to have music whenever they're in a car.
    > I've actually had passengers who squirmed with visible discomfort
    > when I failed to turn on the radio.
    >
    >
    >> (follow-ups set to COLA, as I don't read the other groups)

    >
    > Well, other people who are following this thread do. Myself
    > among them (I'm reading this in misc.consumers.)
    >


    Difficult, ain't it? I'll leave out follow-ups if you like, but I'll
    probably get blasted by someone for cross-posting. But what the hell...

    --
    Kier
     
  18. Kier

    Kier Guest

    On Sun, 17 Jun 2007 15:14:13 +0000, Bert Hyman wrote:

    > In news:137ah3k7df60aaf@corp.supernews.com geoffm@lava.net (Geoff
    > Miller) wrote:
    >
    >> What I don't understand about the whole iPod/Walkman/Discman
    >> phenomenon is why so many people feel the need to listen to
    >> music so much of the time.

    >
    > Since this is cross-posted to a couple of cellphone-related newsgroups,
    > I guess it's OK for me to express my curiosity about why so many
    > people feel the need to be on the phone talking to somebody so much of
    > the time.


    Hey, don't feel you have to excuse getting into this.

    >
    > Kids I can understand; hanging on the landline phone was common long
    > before the advent of the cellphone.
    >
    > Adults however, they're a different story, aren't they?


    Personally, I don't realy enjoy talking on the phone. I like to speak to
    people I can see.

    I suppose it's just an extension of the usual yakking everyone does, not
    just kids, this new trend. Gues I must be just an old dinosaur type.

    --
    Kier
     
  19. Kier

    Kier Guest

    On Sun, 17 Jun 2007 10:45:28 -0500, Justin wrote:

    > Geoff Miller wrote on [Sun, 17 Jun 2007 14:25:56 -0000]:
    >>
    >> What I don't understand about the whole iPod/Walkman/Discman
    >> phenomenon is why so many people feel the need to listen to
    >> music so much of the time. Personally, I find music distrac-
    >> ting when I'm trying to concentrate on something else. And
    >> even when I'm not concentrating on anything in particular, I'm
    >> usually quite content just to think.

    >
    > To keep other noises out, to keep entertained going to and from
    > locations, to listen to things beside music. Look at the podcast
    > community.


    Talking books and audio dramas, too, I should imagine, for the busy
    commuter.

    --
    Kier
     
  20. Jolly Roger

    Jolly Roger Guest

    On 2007-06-17 12:15:26 -0500, Scott en Aztlán <scottenaztlan@yahoo.com> said:

    > geoffm@lava.net (Geoff Miller) said in misc.consumers:
    >
    >> : What better evidence of a consumer product's not sucking could there
    >> : possibly be than the fact that a shitload of them have been sold?
    >>
    >>> Microsoft Windows.

    >>
    >>> 'Nuff said.

    >>
    >> Not so fast.
    >>
    >> Windows works just fine for most people most of the time. That's
    >> why it sells as well as it does, and it's why it doesn't suck.

    >
    > That same argument could be applied to "prove" that factory car
    > stereos made by Delco and Visteon don't suck. After all, millions of
    > them are sold every year, making them among the most successful
    > consumer electronic products of all time.
    >
    > Oh, and the Vortec Cyclone Fuel Saver must not suck, either, since a
    > shitload of those are sold every day too.


    ....and shit must taste really good, because billions of flies can't be wrong!

    *smirk*

    --
    JR
     

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