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Tri-mode vs. Digital question

Discussion in 'alt.cellular.verizon' started by cjw21, Jun 10, 2004.

  1. Peter Pan

    Peter Pan Guest

    They are, either the other poster is a maroon, or just plain ole stupid...


    "Andy Yee" <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote in message
    news:Xns95078E88A51ACayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88
    > I thought the pink areas are the extended digital network.
    >
    > hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote in
    > news:cag1vj02rbu@news2.newsguy.com:
    >>
    >> If you look at the coverage map on the VZW site for America Choice,
    >> note all areas which are light pink or grey. These are analog. Pink
    >> being part of the extended network, grey not ($0.69/min). (OK...
    >> technically, the grey areas just indicate non-extended-network, but
    >> most of them
    >> are analog.)
    >>

    > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    > Andy Yee E-Mail: ayee AT mn dot rr dot com
    > President Home Page:
    > http://home.mn.rr.com/andyyee New Directions Engineering, Inc.
    >
    > Godwin's Law: As a USENET thread grows, the probability of a
    > reference to Hitler or Nazis approaches 1.00.
    > Corollary: When such a reference is made, it is generally
    > recognized that the poster has LOST the argument.
     



    › See More: Tri-mode vs. Digital question
  2. From my understanding of the Verizon Wireless maps, the Enhanced Services
    Map indicates Verizon native coverage, and on the America's Choice Map the
    red is digital coverage (either native or Extended Network) and the pink is
    analog Extended Network.

    -Eric

    "Andy Yee" <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote in message
    news:Xns95078E88A51ACayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88...
    > I thought the pink areas are the extended digital network.
    >
    > hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote in
    > news:cag1vj02rbu@news2.newsguy.com:
    > >
    > > If you look at the coverage map on the VZW site for America Choice, note
    > > all areas which are light pink or grey. These are analog. Pink being
    > > part of the extended network, grey not ($0.69/min). (OK... technically,
    > > the grey areas just indicate non-extended-network, but most of them
    > > are analog.)
    > >

    > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    > Andy Yee E-Mail: ayee AT mn dot rr dot com
    > President Home Page: http://home.mn.rr.com/andyyee
    > New Directions Engineering, Inc.
    >
    > Godwin's Law: As a USENET thread grows, the probability of a reference
    > to Hitler or Nazis approaches 1.00.
    > Corollary: When such a reference is made, it is generally
    > recognized that the poster has LOST the argument.
     
  3. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <Q6ednVh5pcMm1lDdRVn-gw@comcast.com>,
    Eric Rosenberry <erics@R3MOVErosenberry.org> wrote:
    >From my understanding of the Verizon Wireless maps, the Enhanced Services
    >Map indicates Verizon native coverage, and on the America's Choice Map the
    >red is digital coverage (either native or Extended Network) and the pink is
    >analog Extended Network.
    >
    >-Eric
    >
    >"Andy Yee" <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote in message
    >news:Xns95078E88A51ACayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88...
    >> I thought the pink areas are the extended digital network.
    >>
    >> hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote in
    >> news:cag1vj02rbu@news2.newsguy.com:
    >> >
    >> > If you look at the coverage map on the VZW site for America Choice, note
    >> > all areas which are light pink or grey. These are analog. Pink being
    >> > part of the extended network, grey not ($0.69/min). (OK... technically,
    >> > the grey areas just indicate non-extended-network, but most of them
    >> > are analog.)


    On the America's Choice Coverage map (NOT the Enhanced Services/IN-Network
    map!), the first caption has a red box and is labelled: "America's Choice
    All-Digital Home Airtime Rate and Coverage Area". The next line has a pink
    and red box, and is labelled: "America's Choice Home Airtime Rate and
    Coverage Area". The beige is labelled "Roaming Rate and Coverage Area".
    Since the difference between the red caption and the red+pink caption is
    the phrase "All-Digital", one can conclude that the pink on this map is
    "America's Choice Non-Digital Home Airtime Rate and Coverage Area".

    THIS map does not distinguish native VZW and extended-network coverage.
    Quoting from the "IMPORTANT MAP INFORMATION" on this page: "The America's
    Choice map includes networks operated by other carriers".

    The IN-network map does distinguish VZW and extended network.
     
  4. Andy Yee

    Andy Yee Guest

    According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means digital,
    but probably not native coverage...

    Also, the following link shows a bit more detail...

    http://www.verizonwireless.com/b2c/CoverageLocatorController?requesttype=NE
    WREQUEST

    Also shows that the area in pink is indeed extended (non-native) digital
    coverage...

    "Eric Rosenberry" <erics@R3MOVErosenberry.org> wrote in
    news:Q6ednVh5pcMm1lDdRVn-gw@comcast.com:

    > From my understanding of the Verizon Wireless maps, the Enhanced
    > Services Map indicates Verizon native coverage, and on the America's
    > Choice Map the red is digital coverage (either native or Extended
    > Network) and the pink is analog Extended Network.
    >


    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Andy Yee E-Mail: ayee AT mn dot rr dot com
    President Home Page: http://home.mn.rr.com/andyyee
    New Directions Engineering, Inc.

    Godwin's Law: As a USENET thread grows, the probability of a reference
    to Hitler or Nazis approaches 1.00.
    Corollary: When such a reference is made, it is generally
    recognized that the poster has LOST the argument.
     
  5. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means digital,
    >but probably not native coverage...


    ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red labelled
    as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but without the
    "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??
     
  6. Teddeli

    Teddeli Guest

    On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:

    >In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means digital,
    >>but probably not native coverage...

    >
    >??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >(Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red labelled
    >as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but without the
    >"all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??


    Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    haven't seen every map.
     
  7. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com>,
    Teddeli <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:
    >On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >
    >>In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means digital,
    >>>but probably not native coverage...

    >>
    >>??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>(Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red labelled
    >>as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but without the
    >>"all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >
    >Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >haven't seen every map.


    OK... the map I am looking at is:

    <http://www.verizonwireless.com/images_b2c/maps/national/ac.gif>

    I used zip 95014 to get to the page containing this map.

    The caption with only a red box says:

    America's Choice All-Digital Home Airtime Rate and Coverage Area

    The caption with red and pink boxes says:

    America's Choice Home Airtime Rate and Coverage Area

    Where am I going wrong in interpreting pink as analog on this map?

    No mention of native vs. extended.
     
  8. Steven J Sobol wrote:
    >
    > Correct. AT&T Wireless used to advertise its 1900 MHz TDMA as Digital

    PCS,
    > and of course 1900 MHz CDMA has always been advertised by Sprint as

    PCS.
    > Technically, the GSM carriers use "PCS" too since they run at both

    850 and
    > 1900 MHz (the 1900 MHz being the "PCS" band).


    Actually, AT&TWS promoted *all* of its Cellular 800 MHz & PCS 1900 MHz
    IS-136 TDMA markets as Digital PCS -- an only partly incorrect
    misnomer. Probably in response to Sprint PCS' marketing of the PCS
    term, AT&TWS as well presented PCS as some sort of moral good above &
    beyond Cellular. Unfortunately, AT&TWS inaccurately applied the term
    to all of its markets, misrepresenting the roughly half of its IS-136
    footprint that is Cellular 800 MHz.

    Across the Pond in the EU, GSM initially referred only to 900 MHz.
    Though it shared a common air-interface w/ GSM, 1800 MHz was not GSM --
    it was instead DCS (Digital Cellular Service). There was GSM 900. And
    there was DCS 1800. In time, a consistent application of the GSM name
    to all frequency bands prevailed. But some of the earlier nomenclature
    found its way into early North American GSM methodology, such as the
    name BellSouth Mobility DCS & the term PCS 1900. And GSM -- as
    singularly deployed in North America c.1995-2002 -- could accurately
    proclaim itself PCS. Indeed, GSM 1900 was sometimes presented as PCS
    1900. But -- just as GSM 900 is not DCS -- more recent GSM 850 is not
    PCS. Digital, yes. PCS, no.

    Call it what they will, but technically PCS is not a generic term for
    any digital airlink Cellular-like service.

    Andrew
    --
    Andrew Shepherd
    cinema@ku.edu
    cinema@sprintpcs.com
    http://www.wirelesswavelength.com/
     
  9. Peter Pan

    Peter Pan Guest

    "Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    > On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >
    >> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>> digital, but probably not native coverage...

    >>
    >> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >
    > Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    > Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    > Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    > haven't seen every map.


    The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    depending on the provider.

    If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.
     
  10. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  11. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  12. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  13. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  14. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  15. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  16. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  17. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  18. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  19. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  20. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     

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