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Tri-mode vs. Digital question

Discussion in 'alt.cellular.verizon' started by cjw21, Jun 10, 2004.

  1. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     



    › See More: Tri-mode vs. Digital question
  2. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  3. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  4. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  5. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  6. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  7. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  8. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  9. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  10. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  11. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  12. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  13. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  14. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  15. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  16. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  17. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  18. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  19. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     
  20. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
    >> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
    >>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
    >>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
    >>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
    >>>
    >>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
    >>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
    >>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
    >>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

    >>
    >> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
    >> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
    >> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
    >> haven't seen every map.

    >
    >The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
    >While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
    >is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
    >providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
    >and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
    >depending on the provider.
    >
    >If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
    >out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
    >absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.


    I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
    One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
    clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
    only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
    red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
    coverage (red and pink areas).

    As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
    native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
    VZW areas.
     

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