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"Urgency" Use Cellular Services

Discussion in 'alt.cellular.verizon' started by Mike Roman, Jan 25, 2004.

  1. On Sun, 25 Jan 2004 18:58:36 -0500, Mike Roman <eschamp@fastmail.fm>
    wrote:

    >Right now my wife has Verizon analog service that gives her no free
    >minutes for $16/month. Day minutes are aboyt 35 cents and evening,
    >about 16. She uses the phone for outgoing calls only, for specific
    >"informational" calls and for emergencies (such as calling AAA!) and
    >the typical monthly bill is $22-24.
    >
    >Verizon told us that analog service is about to go away so we're
    >looking for something inexpensive to signup for, but all the plans are
    >$40 and up!
    >
    >Can anyone suggest a reasonable replacement? As senior citizens, we
    >have not caught the cellphone bug and don't see a good reason to
    >double our monthly phone bill for features we probably would never
    >use.
    >
    >Thanks.


    They allowed my mother to sign up for a $15/month digital plan. I
    think she gets 30 minutes a month, plus 200 weekend minutes. And they
    even gave her a free Kyo-2325 phone with a 2 year contract. Ask your
    store manager to "look in the book" for such a plan. They don't
    openly advertise such plans for obvious reasons, but they do want to
    keep phones in hands of people who really need them for emergencies.
     



    › See More: "Urgency" Use Cellular Services
  2. In article <qlha105c51288sg2dp3vsn3hsump7r9oki@4ax.com>, Mike wrote:

    > Now, if a GSM phone is without a SIM card, I have no idea what
    > happens. With some sort of SIM card installed, the 911 call should be


    Every GSM phone I've had allows calls to 911/112 with no SIM inserted.

    -SC
    --
    Stanley Cline -- sc1 at roamer1 dot org -- http://www.roamer1.org/
    ....
    "Never put off until tomorrow what you can do today. There might
    be a law against it by that time." -/usr/games/fortune
     
  3. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <slrnc1ator.39j.sc1-news@panix2.panix.com>,
    Stanley Cline <sc1-news@roamer1.org> wrote:
    >In article <qlha105c51288sg2dp3vsn3hsump7r9oki@4ax.com>, Mike wrote:
    >
    >> Now, if a GSM phone is without a SIM card, I have no idea what
    >> happens. With some sort of SIM card installed, the 911 call should be

    >
    >Every GSM phone I've had allows calls to 911/112 with no SIM inserted.


    There was a discussion in one of the cellular newsgroups a few years
    ago where it was pointed out that some countries require GSM phones
    with no SIM to be able to make emergency calls (such as US and Canada),
    but there are other countries that do not require this.
     
  4. Evan Platt

    Evan Platt Guest

    On Mon, 26 Jan 2004 11:58:03 -0500, Mike <inundated9@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >A carrier that does not allow non-activated phones to make 911 calls
    >on their compatible network would be violating federal law.


    Is NextHell exempt? IIRC, I tried 911 on a non-activated Nextel. No
    luck.
    To e-mail me, remove theobvious from my e-mail address.
     
  5. Mike

    Mike Guest

    On Mon, 26 Jan 2004 13:50:42 -0800, Evan Platt
    <evan@theobvious.espphotography.com> wrote:

    >On Mon, 26 Jan 2004 11:58:03 -0500, Mike <inundated9@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    >>A carrier that does not allow non-activated phones to make 911 calls
    >>on their compatible network would be violating federal law.

    >
    >Is NextHell exempt? IIRC, I tried 911 on a non-activated Nextel. No
    >luck.


    Very good question. I half expect John S. to pipe in any minute with
    his "Nextel is not a cellular phone company" line...but it may
    actually mean something in this case. I don't know if the federal law
    I mentioned applies to the voice services of SMR providers, which is
    what Nextel actually is (John, control your joy, please!).

    It may be a loophole...but I'd imagine those who came up with the law
    would not have intended Nextel to be exempt due to a mere technology
    quirk.

    Mike
     
  6. "@(none)" <""cliff\"@(none)"> wrote:
    > I thought 9-1-1 calls should work without any service plans also. But
    > have you ever discontinued with Cingular? Don't know what they do but
    > the phone right after says "No Service" and will not allow 9-1-1 or
    > 6-1-1. And I know they have service there in that area.


    *611 is one thing. If they don't allow 911 calls even on a phone that is
    not on an active account, I believe they are violating FCC regulations and
    can get spanked for running their network that way. (And should.)

    *611 is customer service, and calls to *611 typically aren't made because
    there is a life threatening emergency, so I can see no compelling reason why
    Cingular should be forced to carry such calls on an unactivated phone. 911
    calls are a completely different issue...

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services, Apple Valley, CA
    Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / 888.480.4NET (4638) / sjsobol@JustThe.net
    PGP: C57E 8B25 F994 D6D0 5F6B B961 EA08 9410 E3AE 35ED
     
  7. Al Klein

    Al Klein Guest

    On Mon, 26 Jan 2004 13:58:01 -0500, Mike Roman <eschamp@fastmail.fm>
    posted in alt.cellular.verizon:

    >Al Klein wrote:


    >> "Verizon" meaning an insert in your bill? Or meaning some Verizon rep
    >> who wants to make a commission?


    >Verizon meaning the store rep who called the company to answer our
    >questions.


    The question being can you change the ESN on your account? Or would
    they give you a new phone at a subsidized price without renewing your
    contract? (Renewal can only be to some currently-offered plan.)

    If your wife buys a new phone and asks CS to activate it (or she
    activates it herself on-line), I don't think anyone would say
    anything.
     
  8. Scott Nelson

    Scott Nelson Guest

    True. The only thing about doing it that way is that Verizon is turning off
    AMPS "Paging" outbound, which means you can call out but nobody can call you
    in certain areas when you do this. Plus, if she buys a new phone, why bother
    with putting the older phone back on the account at that point?

    Or are you saying, she buy a newer phone and put it on the old AMPS only
    account?
    Which won't work as the account needs to actually have the digital service
    feature turned on.
    Holdover from years ago when digital was actually a feature you paid extra
    for.
    CS never sees this but happens in background and is plan specific now.

    Or am I missing your point? ;-)

    Scotty


    "Al Klein" <rukbat@pern.org> wrote in message
    news:3trb10lt0a16rn8bktch50hb6hiusr7vh6@Pern.rk...
    > On Mon, 26 Jan 2004 13:58:01 -0500, Mike Roman <eschamp@fastmail.fm>
    > posted in alt.cellular.verizon:
    >
    > >Al Klein wrote:

    >
    > >> "Verizon" meaning an insert in your bill? Or meaning some Verizon rep
    > >> who wants to make a commission?

    >
    > >Verizon meaning the store rep who called the company to answer our
    > >questions.

    >
    > The question being can you change the ESN on your account? Or would
    > they give you a new phone at a subsidized price without renewing your
    > contract? (Renewal can only be to some currently-offered plan.)
    >
    > If your wife buys a new phone and asks CS to activate it (or she
    > activates it herself on-line), I don't think anyone would say
    > anything.
     
  9. Bill Radio

    Bill Radio Guest

    I too know of some plans that they do not make well known. If your service
    is acceptable w/analog stick with it until it stops working, or they make a
    deal you can't refuse. They aren't building any new analog sites, but the
    ones there aren't going away for at least 3 to 4 years.

    A very common plan is the $29.99 Local plan and they may provide a new free
    phone for a year's contract. I have several friends who are hanging on to
    their analog phones as long as they work, and the FCC says they should for
    another 4 years.

    Bill Radio
    Click for Western U.S. Wireless Reviews at:
    http://www.mountainwireless.com




    "The Ghost of General Lee" <ghost@general.lee> wrote in message
    news:i6sa105lokloh9nspfdtptohm3m4mhb6b2@4ax.com...
    > On Sun, 25 Jan 2004 18:58:36 -0500, Mike Roman <eschamp@fastmail.fm>
    > wrote:
    >>

    > They allowed my mother to sign up for a $15/month digital plan. I
    > think she gets 30 minutes a month, plus 200 weekend minutes. And they
    > even gave her a free Kyo-2325 phone with a 2 year contract. Ask your
    > store manager to "look in the book" for such a plan. They don't
    > openly advertise such plans for obvious reasons, but they do want to
    > keep phones in hands of people who really need them for emergencies.
    >
     
  10. Scott Nelson

    Scott Nelson Guest

    True. The only thing about doing it that way is that Verizon is turning off
    AMPS "Paging" outbound, which means you can call out but nobody can call you
    in certain areas when you do this. Plus, if she buys a new phone, why bother
    with putting the older phone back on the account at that point?

    Or are you saying, she buy a newer phone and put it on the old AMPS only
    account?
    Which won't work as the account needs to actually have the digital service
    feature turned on.
    Holdover from years ago when digital was actually a feature you paid extra
    for.
    CS never sees this but happens in background and is plan specific now.

    Or am I missing your point? ;-)

    Scotty



    "Al Klein" <rukbat@pern.org> wrote in message
    news:3trb10lt0a16rn8bktch50hb6hiusr7vh6@Pern.rk...
    > On Mon, 26 Jan 2004 13:58:01 -0500, Mike Roman <eschamp@fastmail.fm>
    > posted in alt.cellular.verizon:
    >
    > >Al Klein wrote:

    >
    > >> "Verizon" meaning an insert in your bill? Or meaning some Verizon rep
    > >> who wants to make a commission?

    >
    > >Verizon meaning the store rep who called the company to answer our
    > >questions.

    >
    > The question being can you change the ESN on your account? Or would
    > they give you a new phone at a subsidized price without renewing your
    > contract? (Renewal can only be to some currently-offered plan.)
    >
    > If your wife buys a new phone and asks CS to activate it (or she
    > activates it herself on-line), I don't think anyone would say
    > anything.
     
  11. Mike Roman

    Mike Roman Guest

    The Ghost of General Lee wrote:

    > They allowed my mother to sign up for a $15/month digital plan. I
    > think she gets 30 minutes a month, plus 200 weekend minutes. And they
    > even gave her a free Kyo-2325 phone with a 2 year contract. Ask your
    > store manager to "look in the book" for such a plan. They don't
    > openly advertise such plans for obvious reasons, but they do want to
    > keep phones in hands of people who really need them for emergencies.


    Verizon did this?
     
  12. Mike Roman

    Mike Roman Guest

    Bill Radio wrote:

    > I too know of some plans that they do not make well known. If your service
    > is acceptable w/analog stick with it until it stops working, or they make a
    > deal you can't refuse. They aren't building any new analog sites, but the
    > ones there aren't going away for at least 3 to 4 years.


    That's what we'll do. If they try to terminate her current plan, I'll
    come back for additional advice.

    > A very common plan is the $29.99 Local plan and they may provide a new free
    > phone for a year's contract. I have several friends who are hanging on to
    > their analog phones as long as they work, and the FCC says they should for
    > another 4 years.
    >
    > Bill Radio
    > Click for Western U.S. Wireless Reviews at:
    > http://www.mountainwireless.com


    Thanks.
     
  13. Mike Roman

    Mike Roman Guest

    Isaiah Beard wrote:

    > Another option would be a prepaid phone. You will have to buy your
    > airtime up-front (like a prepaid calling card) and you'll also probably
    > have to pay for a new phone, but once you buy the minutes, they are
    > generally good for 60-90 days or longer depending on the carrier you go
    > with. So your costs should stay roughly the same as the plan you're on
    > now, or you might even save some money, seeing as you won't have to pay
    > a monthly rate anymore. Verizon's Free-up phones are an option if you
    > wish to continue with them:
    >
    > http://www.verizonwireless.com/zip/plsql/vzw_zip.zip?p_alias=vzw_freeup_direct


    Forgive the naive questions, perhaps of a "senior" nature!

    Verizon offers a $30 "setup card" and a Kyocera KWC 2325pp phone with:

    Standard Lithium Ion Battery
    Charger
    Owner's Manual
    Warranty Card
    250 Bonus Weekend Minutes
    $30 Setup Card
    $30 Mail-in Rebate or $50 Refill / [REUP] Card
    SETUP Guide
    Set up Fee May Apply

    all for $129.99 plus tax.

    What's the setup card for? Does that pay for the minutes I use (\at the
    apparently reasonable rates of 30 cents for daytime weekday minutes and
    15 cents for evening, weekend and "mobile to mobile" (can I call
    somebody's cell phone directly?)?

    Also, they have a "refill" card good for 30 days for $15. Does that
    mean, that if I make less than $15 worth of calls in a month, my monthly
    cost is only $15???


    > There's also tracfone:
    >
    > http://www.tracfone.com


    Too many choices!! :)

    > and VirginMobile:
    >
    > http://www.virginmobileusa.com


    Ditto!
    >
    > Most of the other carriers have their own version of prepay, as well.
    > Just be aware: prepay is best if you either have really bad credit or,
    > as you say, you'll be using the phone very little and just plan to use
    > it for urgent situations. If by chance you do catch the "cellphone
    > bug," then you're going to want to sign up to a term plan (similar to
    > what verizon was offering you). For regular everyday use, prepaid
    > service rates will gouge you compared to the bucket plans that are out
    > there.


    Do the people who have the cell phone bug give up their landlines? What
    will a cell do for you (other than the "constant contact" aspect of
    having a mobile communications device) that a landline phone will not,
    and vice versa?

    Thanks for the suggestions.
     
  14. Dr. WireMORE

    Dr. WireMORE Guest

    In the midwest, this is called a "convenience" plan: $15/month + tax; local
    digital choice, no long distance, 25 minutes a month anytime. No
    nights/weekends here, but I didn't check all the options.

    Dr WireMORE
    Wireless Consulting/Training and Midwest Master Agent

    "Mike Roman" <eschamp@fastmail.fm> wrote in message
    news:20040127192414.931$EH@news.newsreader.com...
    > The Ghost of General Lee wrote:
    >
    > > They allowed my mother to sign up for a $15/month digital plan. I
    > > think she gets 30 minutes a month, plus 200 weekend minutes. And they
    > > even gave her a free Kyo-2325 phone with a 2 year contract. Ask your
    > > store manager to "look in the book" for such a plan. They don't
    > > openly advertise such plans for obvious reasons, but they do want to
    > > keep phones in hands of people who really need them for emergencies.

    >
    > Verizon did this?
     
  15. On Tue, 27 Jan 2004 19:24:14 -0500, Mike Roman <eschamp@fastmail.fm>
    wrote:

    >The Ghost of General Lee wrote:
    >
    >> They allowed my mother to sign up for a $15/month digital plan. I
    >> think she gets 30 minutes a month, plus 200 weekend minutes. And they
    >> even gave her a free Kyo-2325 phone with a 2 year contract. Ask your
    >> store manager to "look in the book" for such a plan. They don't
    >> openly advertise such plans for obvious reasons, but they do want to
    >> keep phones in hands of people who really need them for emergencies.

    >
    >Verizon did this?


    Yep. Simpsonville, SC.
     
  16. On Tue, 27 Jan 2004 19:46:59 -0500, Mike Roman <eschamp@fastmail.fm>
    wrote:

    >Forgive the naive questions, perhaps of a "senior" nature!
    >
    >Verizon offers a $30 "setup card" and a Kyocera KWC 2325pp phone with:
    >
    >Standard Lithium Ion Battery
    >Charger
    >Owner's Manual
    >Warranty Card
    >250 Bonus Weekend Minutes
    >$30 Setup Card
    >$30 Mail-in Rebate or $50 Refill / [REUP] Card
    >SETUP Guide
    >Set up Fee May Apply
    >
    >all for $129.99 plus tax.
    >
    >What's the setup card for?


    To "set up" the account. Basically, it's a service fee which gives
    you no minutes. Not saying I agree with it, but that's just the way
    it is.

    >Does that pay for the minutes I use (\at the
    >apparently reasonable rates of 30 cents for daytime weekday minutes and
    >15 cents for evening, weekend and "mobile to mobile"


    That's what Re-Up cards are for. And I think they changed the Free-Up
    rates. IIRC, they now charge a flat fee for each call, and a lower
    rate per minute. Good if you talk for long periods of time, but you
    get hosed on short calls. I'm sure someone will jump in with the
    details.

    >(can I call
    >somebody's cell phone directly?)?


    Yes, and if it is another VZW phone, you get the M2M rate any time of
    the day.

    >Also, they have a "refill" card good for 30 days for $15. Does that
    >mean, that if I make less than $15 worth of calls in a month, my monthly
    >cost is only $15???


    Well, yes, in a way. This is my only big gripe about the Free-Up
    program. The $15 card minutes are good for 30 days, $30 card minutes
    are good for 60 days, etc. So it is by number of days, and not by the
    month. Seniors, especially those on fixed incomes, could expect to
    have to re-up twice within a month once in a while. I wish they would
    do away with the day count and make them valid for 1 month, 2 months,
    etc. I think VZW could live with eating the extra 5 (or in this
    year's case, 6) days per year. The upside is if you re-up before your
    minutes expire, you carry over unused minutes into the next period.
     
  17. Jim Ancona

    Jim Ancona Guest

    Mike Roman <eschamp@fastmail.fm> wrote in
    news:40170683.8060003@fastmail.fm:

    > Isaiah Beard wrote:
    >
    >> Another option would be a prepaid phone. You will have to buy
    >> your airtime up-front (like a prepaid calling card) and you'll
    >> also probably have to pay for a new phone, but once you buy the
    >> minutes, they are generally good for 60-90 days or longer
    >> depending on the carrier you go with. So your costs should stay
    >> roughly the same as the plan you're on now, or you might even
    >> save some money, seeing as you won't have to pay a monthly rate
    >> anymore.


    By far the best prepaid deal I've seen is from Callplus/Locus Telecom.
    They resell time on AT&T's TDMA network, which means the phones work
    just about anywhere. No roaming charges, and you can buy a phone from
    one of their resellers, or for cheap on eBay. Depending on where you
    buy cards, your cost can be as low as $3.33/month. See Dave Markson's
    site for more info:

    http://markson.net/cell_nh_callplus.htm

    He also has a FAQ at http://markson.net/cell_nh_callplus_faq.htm

    I'm just a satisfied customer.

    Good luck!

    Jim
     
  18. Dr. WireMORE

    Dr. WireMORE Guest

    The slightest correction on what the $30 Setup Card does: It does 2 things:
    1)is the initial setup for your phone, and is required as part of getting
    your initial phone number. 2)The $30 does translate to $30 of value/minutes
    into your phone. 3) Many times there is a special bonus with the starter
    card, like some bonus minutes.

    The $30 re-up card assumes you already have a working number; adds $30 of
    value, and may have it's own bonus (but usually different from above).

    There is no mandatory activation fee. However, the VZW web site says that
    an activation fee may be up to $35 and has nothing to do with either the
    starter card or the re-up card. It is charged by the POS (if charged at
    all) and we charge $35 activation when the customer provides their own
    phone. If we provide the phone, there is no $35 activation fee. Again the
    activation fee is "ours" and is not charged by VZW. Don't exactly know why
    they mention the activation fee... but there is little profit in a pre-pay
    for the POS, so the money is made on either the phone or the activation fee.

    And why charge anything.... to stay in business, the smallest of profits are
    required.


    "The Ghost of General Lee" <ghost@general.lee> wrote in message
    news:ukae10l22m784td1bb785qth827s6g9k3q@4ax.com...
    > On Tue, 27 Jan 2004 19:46:59 -0500, Mike Roman <eschamp@fastmail.fm>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Forgive the naive questions, perhaps of a "senior" nature!
    > >
    > >Verizon offers a $30 "setup card" and a Kyocera KWC 2325pp phone with:
    > >
    > >Standard Lithium Ion Battery
    > >Charger
    > >Owner's Manual
    > >Warranty Card
    > >250 Bonus Weekend Minutes
    > >$30 Setup Card
    > >$30 Mail-in Rebate or $50 Refill / [REUP] Card
    > >SETUP Guide
    > >Set up Fee May Apply
    > >
    > >all for $129.99 plus tax.
    > >
    > >What's the setup card for?

    >
    > To "set up" the account. Basically, it's a service fee which gives
    > you no minutes. Not saying I agree with it, but that's just the way
    > it is.
    >
    > >Does that pay for the minutes I use (\at the
    > >apparently reasonable rates of 30 cents for daytime weekday minutes and
    > >15 cents for evening, weekend and "mobile to mobile"

    >
    > That's what Re-Up cards are for. And I think they changed the Free-Up
    > rates. IIRC, they now charge a flat fee for each call, and a lower
    > rate per minute. Good if you talk for long periods of time, but you
    > get hosed on short calls. I'm sure someone will jump in with the
    > details.
    >
    > >(can I call
    > >somebody's cell phone directly?)?

    >
    > Yes, and if it is another VZW phone, you get the M2M rate any time of
    > the day.
    >
    > >Also, they have a "refill" card good for 30 days for $15. Does that
    > >mean, that if I make less than $15 worth of calls in a month, my monthly
    > >cost is only $15???

    >
    > Well, yes, in a way. This is my only big gripe about the Free-Up
    > program. The $15 card minutes are good for 30 days, $30 card minutes
    > are good for 60 days, etc. So it is by number of days, and not by the
    > month. Seniors, especially those on fixed incomes, could expect to
    > have to re-up twice within a month once in a while. I wish they would
    > do away with the day count and make them valid for 1 month, 2 months,
    > etc. I think VZW could live with eating the extra 5 (or in this
    > year's case, 6) days per year. The upside is if you re-up before your
    > minutes expire, you carry over unused minutes into the next period.
    >
     
  19. Stores have "quotas", and a pre-pay activation counts as one more
    activation. So even if you make some money, or no money, it is good for
    quotas.

    Dr. WireMORE
    Wireless Consulting/Training and Midwest-Master Agent.

    "Stanley Reynolds" <nospam_stanley_reynolds@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:6dydnXFQ6LqBVordRVn-hQ@pghconnect.com...
    > You can buy your re-up card from him or anyone else.
    > I think the $35 plus $30 is all profit for the store or he would not do
    > this, my guess the sells more cards and makes his profits that way. I did
    > buy my first card from him after my phone was activated. I've seen other
    > deals where $30+tax and you end up with your phone active and $30 air time
    > but then I've paid $60 to activate my own phone with $30 airtime. Like
    > anyone who is short of cash live and learn, then go look for the best

    deal.
    >
    > Stanley
    > Catch you can only get FL numbers not a catch for me I wanted a FL number.
    >
    >
     
  20. Isaiah Beard

    Isaiah Beard Guest

    Mike Roman wrote:


    > Forgive the naive questions, perhaps of a "senior" nature!
    >
    > Verizon offers a $30 "setup card" and a Kyocera KWC 2325pp phone with:
    >

    [SNIP of offer details for brevity]

    > What's the setup card for? Does that pay for the minutes I use (\at the
    > apparently reasonable rates of 30 cents for daytime weekday minutes and
    > 15 cents for evening, weekend and "mobile to mobile" (can I call
    > somebody's cell phone directly?)?



    Yes, the setup card should probably be though of as your starter pre-pay
    card that sets you up with $30 in your account. It mentioned a setup
    fee may apply, so in that case, the setup card would probably cover the
    setup fee, and whatever balance is left over would go toward your minutes.

    And yes, you can call someone else's cell phone directly. It would get
    charged at the mobile-to-mobile rate ($.15/minute)

    > Also, they have a "refill" card good for 30 days for $15. Does that
    > mean, that if I make less than $15 worth of calls in a month, my monthly
    > cost is only $15???


    That's correct, the cost would be $15 per month. Also, under "the
    consumer information" section, it appears that unused minutes carry
    forward as long as you "re-up" before the expiration date of your
    previous card.


    >> If by chance you do catch the "cellphone
    >> bug," then you're going to want to sign up to a term plan (similar to
    >> what verizon was offering you). For regular everyday use, prepaid
    >> service rates will gouge you compared to the bucket plans that are out
    >> there.

    >
    >
    > Do the people who have the cell phone bug give up their landlines?


    Some do. I have, simply because the plan I have includes long distance
    charges, all the features I would want, the minutes I have are ample
    enough to cover all the talking I would care to do on the phone every
    month, and coverage is good at my home. Given this, the landline kinda
    became redundant, so I got rid of it.

    > What
    > will a cell do for you (other than the "constant contact" aspect of
    > having a mobile communications device) that a landline phone will not,
    > and vice versa?


    Well, it depends a lot on what kind of calls you make. If you make a
    lot of long distance calls, it's nice not to have to pay those fees,
    since in most cases, long distance is included on most cell phone plans.
    Other than this, portability and convenience are the primary advantages.

    A lot of people say the landline phone has the advantage over cellular
    in that it's more reliable in an emergency. However, my experiences
    have been that the two are about equal. During September 11, and during
    the 2003 northeast blackout, both my cell phone and office lanldine
    phone were unusable for voice calls... in both cases, only text
    messaging on my cell phone worked. Maybe it's just that Verizon;s
    landline service isn't that reliable in Central NJ, but might be better
    in other areas. *shrug*

    >
    > Thanks for the suggestions.



    --
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    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.
     

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