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Verizon Wireless billing trick, scam $40 "mistake"

Discussion in 'alt.cellular.verizon' started by Quick, Jul 1, 2004.

  1. Quick

    Quick Guest

    C C wrote:
    > That activation fee mistake happened to me, too. I got my phone from
    > a VZW store. I am not sure if the salesdroid explained to me on a
    > expected partial billing.


    doh!

    > Random? I signed up last June 3. My first bill showed I had a
    > partial from June 3 to June 11. My billing cycle is every 12th of
    > the month.
    >
    > Why can't Verizon just start the billing cycle on the day of the
    > signing of the contract???


    Sounds like a basis for your next class action.
    "VZW *always* starts your billing cycle a week or less after you
    sign up knowing that you will be using a lot of minutes immediately
    trying out your new phone and service which will result in proration
    overage charges resulting from their intentionally uncomprehensible
    prorating calculation." yea... that's the ticket.

    -Quick

    >
    > "Quick" <dhorwitz@NOSPAMcisco.com> wrote in message
    > news:1088643865.996749@sj-nntpcache-3...
    >> Did they sign up at a VZW store or an agent?
    >> The stores are usually very thorough to point out the
    >> prorating to a billing cycle. Let me guess -- billing
    >> cycle is the 25th of each month? Not very random.
    >>
    >> This is so commonly misunderstood that customer
    >> service usually has the overage charges refunded before
    >> you finish explaining what happened. Same will apply
    >> if you change plans in the middle of a billing cycle but
    >> they are not so apt to give you the auto refund then.
    >>
    >> Your idea of not counting holidays is interesting.
    >> Plans are monthly. Contracts are for years. When
    >> prorating they figure by the month. Unused minutes
    >> do not carry over from month to month and not all
    >> months have holidays in them. How would you
    >> resolve that?
    >>
    >> The activation fee was probably the mistake of the
    >> sales person entering the contracts.
    >>
    >> Here is a trick it sounds like you missed:
    >> Try calling customer service and explain what
    >> happened and ask what they can do for you.
    >>
    >> -Quick
    >>
    >> QuienEs wrote:
    >>> Two of my relatives just signed up for Verizon Wireless' "America's
    >>> Choice" plan.
    >>>
    >>> On the surface it sounds good, 400 shared peak time minutes
    >>> per-month, unlimited nights and weekends usage, no long distance
    >>> charges and additional benefits.
    >>>
    >>> They have been with Verizon Wireless for about 10 days and the 1st
    >>> bill came, with some surprises:
    >>>
    >>> 1/ TRICK
    >>>
    >>> Their "month" did not start when the phones were activated,
    >>> SURPRISE ! -- it started 4 days later. We learned that your
    >>> "month" can start anytime - the dealer told us today it is sort of
    >>> random, 3-days after you sign up, or 10 days or 15 days.
    >>>
    >>> The problem for them was that the first 3 days were treated as a
    >>> pro-rated partial month. They got screwed because they used their
    >>> beautiful new cell phones a lot those 1st 3 days thinking they had
    >>> 400 peak minutes to spread over 30 or 31 days, but Verizon Wireless
    >>> pro-rated the 3 days at 13 peak minutes each which, in their newbie
    >>> enthusiasm, they had exceeded - resulting in a 3-day [ at 45-cents
    >>> per minute ] charge of around $7 for "excess minutes".
    >>>
    >>> 2/ SCAM [ adding insult to injury ]
    >>>
    >>> The scam is the use of 13 minutes per day for the pro-rated period.
    >>> Apparently they get that figure by dividing 4800 minutes per year by
    >>> 365 = 13.15 minutes per day.
    >>>
    >>> The accurate number should take into account that weekends are free.
    >>> 2x52 = 104 free days. 365-104 = 261 days to which peak minutes
    >>> apply. 4800/261 = 18.39 minutes allowance per peak day.
    >>>
    >>> 3/ $40 billing computer "mistake"
    >>>
    >>> They advertise: "One- or Two-year agreement required per line. $35
    >>> activation fee per line on one-year agreements, and $15 activation
    >>> fee per line on two-year agreements."
    >>>
    >>> My relatives signed up for 2-years, confirmed by Verizon's billing
    >>> department and the dealer today. But the bill shows two $35
    >>> activation fees, not two $15 activation fees. One can assume that
    >>> their billing computer makes this "mistake" for everyone.
    >>>
    >>> Comments welcome, especially about any tricks we may ahve missed.
    >>>
    >>> QE in NJ
     



    › See More: Verizon Wireless billing trick, scam $40 "mistake"
  2. Quick

    Quick Guest

    C C wrote:
    > That activation fee mistake happened to me, too. I got my phone from
    > a VZW store. I am not sure if the salesdroid explained to me on a
    > expected partial billing.


    doh!

    > Random? I signed up last June 3. My first bill showed I had a
    > partial from June 3 to June 11. My billing cycle is every 12th of
    > the month.
    >
    > Why can't Verizon just start the billing cycle on the day of the
    > signing of the contract???


    Sounds like a basis for your next class action.
    "VZW *always* starts your billing cycle a week or less after you
    sign up knowing that you will be using a lot of minutes immediately
    trying out your new phone and service which will result in proration
    overage charges resulting from their intentionally uncomprehensible
    prorating calculation." yea... that's the ticket.

    -Quick

    >
    > "Quick" <dhorwitz@NOSPAMcisco.com> wrote in message
    > news:1088643865.996749@sj-nntpcache-3...
    >> Did they sign up at a VZW store or an agent?
    >> The stores are usually very thorough to point out the
    >> prorating to a billing cycle. Let me guess -- billing
    >> cycle is the 25th of each month? Not very random.
    >>
    >> This is so commonly misunderstood that customer
    >> service usually has the overage charges refunded before
    >> you finish explaining what happened. Same will apply
    >> if you change plans in the middle of a billing cycle but
    >> they are not so apt to give you the auto refund then.
    >>
    >> Your idea of not counting holidays is interesting.
    >> Plans are monthly. Contracts are for years. When
    >> prorating they figure by the month. Unused minutes
    >> do not carry over from month to month and not all
    >> months have holidays in them. How would you
    >> resolve that?
    >>
    >> The activation fee was probably the mistake of the
    >> sales person entering the contracts.
    >>
    >> Here is a trick it sounds like you missed:
    >> Try calling customer service and explain what
    >> happened and ask what they can do for you.
    >>
    >> -Quick
    >>
    >> QuienEs wrote:
    >>> Two of my relatives just signed up for Verizon Wireless' "America's
    >>> Choice" plan.
    >>>
    >>> On the surface it sounds good, 400 shared peak time minutes
    >>> per-month, unlimited nights and weekends usage, no long distance
    >>> charges and additional benefits.
    >>>
    >>> They have been with Verizon Wireless for about 10 days and the 1st
    >>> bill came, with some surprises:
    >>>
    >>> 1/ TRICK
    >>>
    >>> Their "month" did not start when the phones were activated,
    >>> SURPRISE ! -- it started 4 days later. We learned that your
    >>> "month" can start anytime - the dealer told us today it is sort of
    >>> random, 3-days after you sign up, or 10 days or 15 days.
    >>>
    >>> The problem for them was that the first 3 days were treated as a
    >>> pro-rated partial month. They got screwed because they used their
    >>> beautiful new cell phones a lot those 1st 3 days thinking they had
    >>> 400 peak minutes to spread over 30 or 31 days, but Verizon Wireless
    >>> pro-rated the 3 days at 13 peak minutes each which, in their newbie
    >>> enthusiasm, they had exceeded - resulting in a 3-day [ at 45-cents
    >>> per minute ] charge of around $7 for "excess minutes".
    >>>
    >>> 2/ SCAM [ adding insult to injury ]
    >>>
    >>> The scam is the use of 13 minutes per day for the pro-rated period.
    >>> Apparently they get that figure by dividing 4800 minutes per year by
    >>> 365 = 13.15 minutes per day.
    >>>
    >>> The accurate number should take into account that weekends are free.
    >>> 2x52 = 104 free days. 365-104 = 261 days to which peak minutes
    >>> apply. 4800/261 = 18.39 minutes allowance per peak day.
    >>>
    >>> 3/ $40 billing computer "mistake"
    >>>
    >>> They advertise: "One- or Two-year agreement required per line. $35
    >>> activation fee per line on one-year agreements, and $15 activation
    >>> fee per line on two-year agreements."
    >>>
    >>> My relatives signed up for 2-years, confirmed by Verizon's billing
    >>> department and the dealer today. But the bill shows two $35
    >>> activation fees, not two $15 activation fees. One can assume that
    >>> their billing computer makes this "mistake" for everyone.
    >>>
    >>> Comments welcome, especially about any tricks we may ahve missed.
    >>>
    >>> QE in NJ
     
  3. Elector

    Elector Guest

    "Quick" <dhorwitz@NOSPAMcisco.com> wrote in message
    news:1088790266.873544@sj-nntpcache-3...
    > C C wrote:
    >
    > > What if I wasn't paying attention to my bill? Verizon could have
    > > sucked my extra $20 on the "billing mistake".
    > > Can this be ground for class action? Just curious.

    >
    > Why sure. Claim that they routinely and intentionally do this.
    > Of course I think you have to show damage/loss. You have
    > to wonder how large the class would be. People who pay
    > their initial bill without looking at it for more than what it was
    > suppose to be. You wouldn't be part of the class since you
    > called them and they fixed it.
    >
    > -Quick
    >
    >


    A class action can be done even if they get a call and its corrected.
    Its the act of commission or omission that makes the class action
    viable. They are doing this to others that have not had it taken care
    of or to others that just paid the bill and never checked, or verizon
    is doing it routinely as to enrich themselves illegally. All of which
    a good attorney will gladly point out.

    When I call lets say I tell them that they are doing this to all the
    new activation customers with full knowledge that its wrong and to
    steal from the customer base. It then becomes a job for Verizon to
    check every single persons new activation to confirm it is correct. Of
    course you file suit while they are looking and that is how the game
    is played.

    The lawyers make a gang of money, the class participants get a voucher
    for goods or services etc. or the credit back to their account. In the
    meantime the company finds other ways to rip off the customer base to
    pay out the class. Nice of the legal system huh?

    Elector
     
  4. Elector

    Elector Guest

    "Quick" <dhorwitz@NOSPAMcisco.com> wrote in message
    news:1088790266.873544@sj-nntpcache-3...
    > C C wrote:
    >
    > > What if I wasn't paying attention to my bill? Verizon could have
    > > sucked my extra $20 on the "billing mistake".
    > > Can this be ground for class action? Just curious.

    >
    > Why sure. Claim that they routinely and intentionally do this.
    > Of course I think you have to show damage/loss. You have
    > to wonder how large the class would be. People who pay
    > their initial bill without looking at it for more than what it was
    > suppose to be. You wouldn't be part of the class since you
    > called them and they fixed it.
    >
    > -Quick
    >
    >


    A class action can be done even if they get a call and its corrected.
    Its the act of commission or omission that makes the class action
    viable. They are doing this to others that have not had it taken care
    of or to others that just paid the bill and never checked, or verizon
    is doing it routinely as to enrich themselves illegally. All of which
    a good attorney will gladly point out.

    When I call lets say I tell them that they are doing this to all the
    new activation customers with full knowledge that its wrong and to
    steal from the customer base. It then becomes a job for Verizon to
    check every single persons new activation to confirm it is correct. Of
    course you file suit while they are looking and that is how the game
    is played.

    The lawyers make a gang of money, the class participants get a voucher
    for goods or services etc. or the credit back to their account. In the
    meantime the company finds other ways to rip off the customer base to
    pay out the class. Nice of the legal system huh?

    Elector
     
  5. Elector

    Elector Guest

    "Quick" <dhorwitz@NOSPAMcisco.com> wrote in message
    news:1088790266.873544@sj-nntpcache-3...
    > C C wrote:
    >
    > > What if I wasn't paying attention to my bill? Verizon could have
    > > sucked my extra $20 on the "billing mistake".
    > > Can this be ground for class action? Just curious.

    >
    > Why sure. Claim that they routinely and intentionally do this.
    > Of course I think you have to show damage/loss. You have
    > to wonder how large the class would be. People who pay
    > their initial bill without looking at it for more than what it was
    > suppose to be. You wouldn't be part of the class since you
    > called them and they fixed it.
    >
    > -Quick
    >
    >


    A class action can be done even if they get a call and its corrected.
    Its the act of commission or omission that makes the class action
    viable. They are doing this to others that have not had it taken care
    of or to others that just paid the bill and never checked, or verizon
    is doing it routinely as to enrich themselves illegally. All of which
    a good attorney will gladly point out.

    When I call lets say I tell them that they are doing this to all the
    new activation customers with full knowledge that its wrong and to
    steal from the customer base. It then becomes a job for Verizon to
    check every single persons new activation to confirm it is correct. Of
    course you file suit while they are looking and that is how the game
    is played.

    The lawyers make a gang of money, the class participants get a voucher
    for goods or services etc. or the credit back to their account. In the
    meantime the company finds other ways to rip off the customer base to
    pay out the class. Nice of the legal system huh?

    Elector
     
  6. Elector

    Elector Guest

    "Quick" <dhorwitz@NOSPAMcisco.com> wrote in message
    news:1088790266.873544@sj-nntpcache-3...
    > C C wrote:
    >
    > > What if I wasn't paying attention to my bill? Verizon could have
    > > sucked my extra $20 on the "billing mistake".
    > > Can this be ground for class action? Just curious.

    >
    > Why sure. Claim that they routinely and intentionally do this.
    > Of course I think you have to show damage/loss. You have
    > to wonder how large the class would be. People who pay
    > their initial bill without looking at it for more than what it was
    > suppose to be. You wouldn't be part of the class since you
    > called them and they fixed it.
    >
    > -Quick
    >
    >


    A class action can be done even if they get a call and its corrected.
    Its the act of commission or omission that makes the class action
    viable. They are doing this to others that have not had it taken care
    of or to others that just paid the bill and never checked, or verizon
    is doing it routinely as to enrich themselves illegally. All of which
    a good attorney will gladly point out.

    When I call lets say I tell them that they are doing this to all the
    new activation customers with full knowledge that its wrong and to
    steal from the customer base. It then becomes a job for Verizon to
    check every single persons new activation to confirm it is correct. Of
    course you file suit while they are looking and that is how the game
    is played.

    The lawyers make a gang of money, the class participants get a voucher
    for goods or services etc. or the credit back to their account. In the
    meantime the company finds other ways to rip off the customer base to
    pay out the class. Nice of the legal system huh?

    Elector
     
  7. Bob Scheurle

    Bob Scheurle Guest

    On Thu, 1 Jul 2004 09:46:49 -0400, "Killer Madness" <killermo@cnet.com>
    wrote:
    >Why the FUCK do we have to be nice to expect a refund of stolen
    >money????????


    It's not "stolen money". It's the way the billing system works, and it
    would have been described to you if you had gone to a Verizon Store.
    (You didn't answer my question about that.) It seems to me that the
    problem was with the agent you bought the service from, not Verizon
    itself. But I'm sure Verizon will take care of the misunderstanding
    quickly and with no hassle.

    >Some incompetent idiot on the other end of the phone is the
    >decision maker if I get any money back or help with a mistake on my bill, so
    >we have to be nice to make sure it's corrected in a professional fashsion?


    All the customer service folks at Verizon that I've talked to were highly
    competent and solved any problems very quickly. They also took however
    much time was necessary to explain details to me, answer my questions,
    and solve my problems. You don't get 39 MILLION customers by providing
    poor service.

    >People, doesn't this PISS you off? Where you have to be nice (because if you
    >don't, you'll never see a billing mistake fixed) or you'll never get a
    >billing mikstake fixed!!???


    It's nice to be important, but it's more important to be nice.

    >I say screw that, open up your fat mouth Verizon
    >I'm taking a dump. You can't be serious to *have* to be nice to get some
    >help, specially when it's a known billing mistake or a frauderlant code
    >written in their billing software.


    So have you canceled your service yet? If not, why are you giving your
    business to a company that supposedly acts like you say? Or do you bitch
    and moan because you like to bitch and moan?
     
  8. Bob Scheurle

    Bob Scheurle Guest

    On Thu, 1 Jul 2004 09:46:49 -0400, "Killer Madness" <killermo@cnet.com>
    wrote:
    >Why the FUCK do we have to be nice to expect a refund of stolen
    >money????????


    It's not "stolen money". It's the way the billing system works, and it
    would have been described to you if you had gone to a Verizon Store.
    (You didn't answer my question about that.) It seems to me that the
    problem was with the agent you bought the service from, not Verizon
    itself. But I'm sure Verizon will take care of the misunderstanding
    quickly and with no hassle.

    >Some incompetent idiot on the other end of the phone is the
    >decision maker if I get any money back or help with a mistake on my bill, so
    >we have to be nice to make sure it's corrected in a professional fashsion?


    All the customer service folks at Verizon that I've talked to were highly
    competent and solved any problems very quickly. They also took however
    much time was necessary to explain details to me, answer my questions,
    and solve my problems. You don't get 39 MILLION customers by providing
    poor service.

    >People, doesn't this PISS you off? Where you have to be nice (because if you
    >don't, you'll never see a billing mistake fixed) or you'll never get a
    >billing mikstake fixed!!???


    It's nice to be important, but it's more important to be nice.

    >I say screw that, open up your fat mouth Verizon
    >I'm taking a dump. You can't be serious to *have* to be nice to get some
    >help, specially when it's a known billing mistake or a frauderlant code
    >written in their billing software.


    So have you canceled your service yet? If not, why are you giving your
    business to a company that supposedly acts like you say? Or do you bitch
    and moan because you like to bitch and moan?
     
  9. Bob Scheurle

    Bob Scheurle Guest

    On Thu, 1 Jul 2004 09:46:49 -0400, "Killer Madness" <killermo@cnet.com>
    wrote:
    >Why the FUCK do we have to be nice to expect a refund of stolen
    >money????????


    It's not "stolen money". It's the way the billing system works, and it
    would have been described to you if you had gone to a Verizon Store.
    (You didn't answer my question about that.) It seems to me that the
    problem was with the agent you bought the service from, not Verizon
    itself. But I'm sure Verizon will take care of the misunderstanding
    quickly and with no hassle.

    >Some incompetent idiot on the other end of the phone is the
    >decision maker if I get any money back or help with a mistake on my bill, so
    >we have to be nice to make sure it's corrected in a professional fashsion?


    All the customer service folks at Verizon that I've talked to were highly
    competent and solved any problems very quickly. They also took however
    much time was necessary to explain details to me, answer my questions,
    and solve my problems. You don't get 39 MILLION customers by providing
    poor service.

    >People, doesn't this PISS you off? Where you have to be nice (because if you
    >don't, you'll never see a billing mistake fixed) or you'll never get a
    >billing mikstake fixed!!???


    It's nice to be important, but it's more important to be nice.

    >I say screw that, open up your fat mouth Verizon
    >I'm taking a dump. You can't be serious to *have* to be nice to get some
    >help, specially when it's a known billing mistake or a frauderlant code
    >written in their billing software.


    So have you canceled your service yet? If not, why are you giving your
    business to a company that supposedly acts like you say? Or do you bitch
    and moan because you like to bitch and moan?
     
  10. Bob Scheurle

    Bob Scheurle Guest

    On Thu, 1 Jul 2004 09:46:49 -0400, "Killer Madness" <killermo@cnet.com>
    wrote:
    >Why the FUCK do we have to be nice to expect a refund of stolen
    >money????????


    It's not "stolen money". It's the way the billing system works, and it
    would have been described to you if you had gone to a Verizon Store.
    (You didn't answer my question about that.) It seems to me that the
    problem was with the agent you bought the service from, not Verizon
    itself. But I'm sure Verizon will take care of the misunderstanding
    quickly and with no hassle.

    >Some incompetent idiot on the other end of the phone is the
    >decision maker if I get any money back or help with a mistake on my bill, so
    >we have to be nice to make sure it's corrected in a professional fashsion?


    All the customer service folks at Verizon that I've talked to were highly
    competent and solved any problems very quickly. They also took however
    much time was necessary to explain details to me, answer my questions,
    and solve my problems. You don't get 39 MILLION customers by providing
    poor service.

    >People, doesn't this PISS you off? Where you have to be nice (because if you
    >don't, you'll never see a billing mistake fixed) or you'll never get a
    >billing mikstake fixed!!???


    It's nice to be important, but it's more important to be nice.

    >I say screw that, open up your fat mouth Verizon
    >I'm taking a dump. You can't be serious to *have* to be nice to get some
    >help, specially when it's a known billing mistake or a frauderlant code
    >written in their billing software.


    So have you canceled your service yet? If not, why are you giving your
    business to a company that supposedly acts like you say? Or do you bitch
    and moan because you like to bitch and moan?
     
  11. Bob Scheurle

    Bob Scheurle Guest

    On Thu, 1 Jul 2004 09:46:49 -0400, "Killer Madness" <killermo@cnet.com>
    wrote:
    >Why the FUCK do we have to be nice to expect a refund of stolen
    >money????????


    It's not "stolen money". It's the way the billing system works, and it
    would have been described to you if you had gone to a Verizon Store.
    (You didn't answer my question about that.) It seems to me that the
    problem was with the agent you bought the service from, not Verizon
    itself. But I'm sure Verizon will take care of the misunderstanding
    quickly and with no hassle.

    >Some incompetent idiot on the other end of the phone is the
    >decision maker if I get any money back or help with a mistake on my bill, so
    >we have to be nice to make sure it's corrected in a professional fashsion?


    All the customer service folks at Verizon that I've talked to were highly
    competent and solved any problems very quickly. They also took however
    much time was necessary to explain details to me, answer my questions,
    and solve my problems. You don't get 39 MILLION customers by providing
    poor service.

    >People, doesn't this PISS you off? Where you have to be nice (because if you
    >don't, you'll never see a billing mistake fixed) or you'll never get a
    >billing mikstake fixed!!???


    It's nice to be important, but it's more important to be nice.

    >I say screw that, open up your fat mouth Verizon
    >I'm taking a dump. You can't be serious to *have* to be nice to get some
    >help, specially when it's a known billing mistake or a frauderlant code
    >written in their billing software.


    So have you canceled your service yet? If not, why are you giving your
    business to a company that supposedly acts like you say? Or do you bitch
    and moan because you like to bitch and moan?
     
  12. Bob Scheurle

    Bob Scheurle Guest

    On Thu, 1 Jul 2004 22:48:29 -0400, "Killer Madness" <killermo@cnet.com>
    wrote:
    >Hey Putz...I bet no one EVER on here posted a billing mistake in the
    >customer's favor.


    Of course not. You'd have to be a moron to do that. Someone might see
    the post and fix the mistake. I've seen people do similar things
    regarding their Internet Service Provider (e.g., brag about how they're
    being undercharged), and two days later their account gets cut off.

    >How is that possible with so many customer's? O, I know.
    >The billing system was designed to NEVER make a mistake IN the customer's
    >favor.


    Oh, so you'd design a system that WOULD make mistakes in the customer's
    favor? I hope you don't look for a job in the software industry. I can
    see your resume now: Wrote a billing system that intentionally made
    mistakes. Sure!
     
  13. Bob Scheurle

    Bob Scheurle Guest

    On Thu, 1 Jul 2004 22:48:29 -0400, "Killer Madness" <killermo@cnet.com>
    wrote:
    >Hey Putz...I bet no one EVER on here posted a billing mistake in the
    >customer's favor.


    Of course not. You'd have to be a moron to do that. Someone might see
    the post and fix the mistake. I've seen people do similar things
    regarding their Internet Service Provider (e.g., brag about how they're
    being undercharged), and two days later their account gets cut off.

    >How is that possible with so many customer's? O, I know.
    >The billing system was designed to NEVER make a mistake IN the customer's
    >favor.


    Oh, so you'd design a system that WOULD make mistakes in the customer's
    favor? I hope you don't look for a job in the software industry. I can
    see your resume now: Wrote a billing system that intentionally made
    mistakes. Sure!
     
  14. Bob Scheurle

    Bob Scheurle Guest

    On Thu, 1 Jul 2004 22:48:29 -0400, "Killer Madness" <killermo@cnet.com>
    wrote:
    >Hey Putz...I bet no one EVER on here posted a billing mistake in the
    >customer's favor.


    Of course not. You'd have to be a moron to do that. Someone might see
    the post and fix the mistake. I've seen people do similar things
    regarding their Internet Service Provider (e.g., brag about how they're
    being undercharged), and two days later their account gets cut off.

    >How is that possible with so many customer's? O, I know.
    >The billing system was designed to NEVER make a mistake IN the customer's
    >favor.


    Oh, so you'd design a system that WOULD make mistakes in the customer's
    favor? I hope you don't look for a job in the software industry. I can
    see your resume now: Wrote a billing system that intentionally made
    mistakes. Sure!
     
  15. Bob Scheurle

    Bob Scheurle Guest

    On Thu, 1 Jul 2004 22:48:29 -0400, "Killer Madness" <killermo@cnet.com>
    wrote:
    >Hey Putz...I bet no one EVER on here posted a billing mistake in the
    >customer's favor.


    Of course not. You'd have to be a moron to do that. Someone might see
    the post and fix the mistake. I've seen people do similar things
    regarding their Internet Service Provider (e.g., brag about how they're
    being undercharged), and two days later their account gets cut off.

    >How is that possible with so many customer's? O, I know.
    >The billing system was designed to NEVER make a mistake IN the customer's
    >favor.


    Oh, so you'd design a system that WOULD make mistakes in the customer's
    favor? I hope you don't look for a job in the software industry. I can
    see your resume now: Wrote a billing system that intentionally made
    mistakes. Sure!
     
  16. Bob Scheurle

    Bob Scheurle Guest

    On Thu, 1 Jul 2004 22:48:29 -0400, "Killer Madness" <killermo@cnet.com>
    wrote:
    >Hey Putz...I bet no one EVER on here posted a billing mistake in the
    >customer's favor.


    Of course not. You'd have to be a moron to do that. Someone might see
    the post and fix the mistake. I've seen people do similar things
    regarding their Internet Service Provider (e.g., brag about how they're
    being undercharged), and two days later their account gets cut off.

    >How is that possible with so many customer's? O, I know.
    >The billing system was designed to NEVER make a mistake IN the customer's
    >favor.


    Oh, so you'd design a system that WOULD make mistakes in the customer's
    favor? I hope you don't look for a job in the software industry. I can
    see your resume now: Wrote a billing system that intentionally made
    mistakes. Sure!
     
  17. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    "Killer Madness" <killermo@cnet.com> wrote in
    news:KDUEc.3347$YK5.1122@fe32.usenetserver.com:

    > Thank you Tom. And of course we'll come to expect people saying, "did
    > you read the fine print", or, "did you ask those questions before
    > signing". I bet half the people in this group has been robbed or has
    > had money taken from them every month without even knowing about it.
    > Not a lot of money to notice right away...but like I said before. When
    > you have billing *mistakes* happen to hundred of thousands of people,
    > your going to get a lot of money out of it.
    >


    Conversely, I won the lottery a few years ago when a credit for over $400
    showed up on my Verizon Wireless bill! I sat tight, figuring the idiots
    running the company would notice their error and kept putting money into
    the wireless pot to pay the bill after the error was discovered.

    The same idiots you've dealt with never noticed or wouldn't admit they'd
    made a mistake of this proportion to their managers, putting their asses on
    the block. So, I got a "Good Customer Bonus" for a few months before my
    credit ran out....to my delight.....(c;

    Does anyone but me ALWAYS overpay and recurring bill by some odd amount
    like 73 cents? I always do. If the bill is for $42, I send them a check
    for $42.73 and always maintain that little credit to my account. You just
    KNOW whatever company has these few dollars on that stupid computer have
    GOTTA screw up every so many billings......ad nauseum. I used to play this
    game with Bell$not landline for 30 years.....worked great!

    Larry
    try it....great fun.
     
  18. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    "Killer Madness" <killermo@cnet.com> wrote in
    news:KDUEc.3347$YK5.1122@fe32.usenetserver.com:

    > Thank you Tom. And of course we'll come to expect people saying, "did
    > you read the fine print", or, "did you ask those questions before
    > signing". I bet half the people in this group has been robbed or has
    > had money taken from them every month without even knowing about it.
    > Not a lot of money to notice right away...but like I said before. When
    > you have billing *mistakes* happen to hundred of thousands of people,
    > your going to get a lot of money out of it.
    >


    Conversely, I won the lottery a few years ago when a credit for over $400
    showed up on my Verizon Wireless bill! I sat tight, figuring the idiots
    running the company would notice their error and kept putting money into
    the wireless pot to pay the bill after the error was discovered.

    The same idiots you've dealt with never noticed or wouldn't admit they'd
    made a mistake of this proportion to their managers, putting their asses on
    the block. So, I got a "Good Customer Bonus" for a few months before my
    credit ran out....to my delight.....(c;

    Does anyone but me ALWAYS overpay and recurring bill by some odd amount
    like 73 cents? I always do. If the bill is for $42, I send them a check
    for $42.73 and always maintain that little credit to my account. You just
    KNOW whatever company has these few dollars on that stupid computer have
    GOTTA screw up every so many billings......ad nauseum. I used to play this
    game with Bell$not landline for 30 years.....worked great!

    Larry
    try it....great fun.
     
  19. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    "Killer Madness" <killermo@cnet.com> wrote in
    news:KDUEc.3347$YK5.1122@fe32.usenetserver.com:

    > Thank you Tom. And of course we'll come to expect people saying, "did
    > you read the fine print", or, "did you ask those questions before
    > signing". I bet half the people in this group has been robbed or has
    > had money taken from them every month without even knowing about it.
    > Not a lot of money to notice right away...but like I said before. When
    > you have billing *mistakes* happen to hundred of thousands of people,
    > your going to get a lot of money out of it.
    >


    Conversely, I won the lottery a few years ago when a credit for over $400
    showed up on my Verizon Wireless bill! I sat tight, figuring the idiots
    running the company would notice their error and kept putting money into
    the wireless pot to pay the bill after the error was discovered.

    The same idiots you've dealt with never noticed or wouldn't admit they'd
    made a mistake of this proportion to their managers, putting their asses on
    the block. So, I got a "Good Customer Bonus" for a few months before my
    credit ran out....to my delight.....(c;

    Does anyone but me ALWAYS overpay and recurring bill by some odd amount
    like 73 cents? I always do. If the bill is for $42, I send them a check
    for $42.73 and always maintain that little credit to my account. You just
    KNOW whatever company has these few dollars on that stupid computer have
    GOTTA screw up every so many billings......ad nauseum. I used to play this
    game with Bell$not landline for 30 years.....worked great!

    Larry
    try it....great fun.
     
  20. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    "Killer Madness" <killermo@cnet.com> wrote in
    news:KDUEc.3347$YK5.1122@fe32.usenetserver.com:

    > Thank you Tom. And of course we'll come to expect people saying, "did
    > you read the fine print", or, "did you ask those questions before
    > signing". I bet half the people in this group has been robbed or has
    > had money taken from them every month without even knowing about it.
    > Not a lot of money to notice right away...but like I said before. When
    > you have billing *mistakes* happen to hundred of thousands of people,
    > your going to get a lot of money out of it.
    >


    Conversely, I won the lottery a few years ago when a credit for over $400
    showed up on my Verizon Wireless bill! I sat tight, figuring the idiots
    running the company would notice their error and kept putting money into
    the wireless pot to pay the bill after the error was discovered.

    The same idiots you've dealt with never noticed or wouldn't admit they'd
    made a mistake of this proportion to their managers, putting their asses on
    the block. So, I got a "Good Customer Bonus" for a few months before my
    credit ran out....to my delight.....(c;

    Does anyone but me ALWAYS overpay and recurring bill by some odd amount
    like 73 cents? I always do. If the bill is for $42, I send them a check
    for $42.73 and always maintain that little credit to my account. You just
    KNOW whatever company has these few dollars on that stupid computer have
    GOTTA screw up every so many billings......ad nauseum. I used to play this
    game with Bell$not landline for 30 years.....worked great!

    Larry
    try it....great fun.
     

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