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Want to have fun with customer service? Do this!

Discussion in 'alt.cellular.verizon' started by AL, Sep 16, 2003.

  1. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    On Wed, 17 Sep 2003 06:25:52 -0000, malebomb@comcast.net (Male Bomb)
    wrote:

    >
    >
    >
    >> Actually, in SC, ONE carrier DOES provide fairly accurate COVERAGE
    >> maps to the consumers.......
    >>
    >> http://www.nextel.com/cgi-bin/localMarketMap.cgi?market=mkt16
    >>
    >> Notice how its not one solid red color way out in the boondocks, like
    >> Verizon's map of SC.
    >>
    >> The real hoot is the Verizon map showing the whole left side of SC has
    >> digital PTT service! Hell, most places on the left side are AMPS
    >> towers....(c;

    >
    >Well port your # to Nextel and you should be happy.... ya think? MB
    >

    No, Stupid, look at the Nextel HONESTY map. It has no coverage where
    my bagphone works in the boondocks. But, unlike your company, it
    admits it doesn't.



    Larry W4CSC

    3600 planes with transponders are burning 8-10 million
    gallons of kerosene per hour over the USA. R-12 car air
    conditioners are responsible for the ozone hole, right?



    › See More: Want to have fun with customer service? Do this!
  2. PHil_Real

    PHil_Real Guest

    In article <vmf6hn4nm6qc30@corp.supernews.com>,
    CellAcademician@NOXXhotmailXXNO.com (Cell Academician) wrote:

    > lately@late.com (cell play) wrote in article
    > <vmf5j9em2sr689@corp.supernews.com>:
    > > Got me on what? I care about my costs and end product. Just like the
    > > many frivolous lawsuits filed in America every day, those costs are
    > > reflected in our premiums. Calling customer service to ask about every
    > > plank of the Consumer code to get a rise costs $7. Do you think
    > > cellular companies eat that cost? If you do, you're naive. It's
    > > reflected in plan costs.

    >
    > Actually, you are naive. Plan costs are not computed by
    > some formula based on the cost of providing service.
    > The plans are priced according to the market. The reason
    > that there are so many different plans is that the carrier
    > is attempting to both not lose subscribers based on price,
    > but not leave money on the able from subscribers for
    > whom price is not an over-riding issue.
    >
    > Furthermore, even if dividing the cost of customer
    > service by the total calls, comes out to $7, this does
    > not mean that the incremental cost of another call is
    > $7, in reality the incremental cost is close to zero.


    But if the base cost of service (Towers, Phone subsidy, Customer
    Service, Administrative Overhead, Marketing, Billing) is say $50 per
    customer, and you have plans that start at $29.99 for competitive
    reasons; you have a problem. One factor all cell companies compute is
    revenue per customer. If your costs are say $50, and your average
    revenue is less than that because of all the $29.99 customers, or you're
    giving out too many 25% discounts to corporate customers on $60 plans,
    then (like SprintPCS) you're losing money.

    What Sprint has been trying to do (with apparently not enough success as
    they're still losing money) is:

    1. Sell more Services: Vision - Voice Dial - etc.

    2. Sell fancier phones with little or no subsidy: i500 etc.

    3. Cut corners - On Customer Service

    4. Push more 2 year contracts -

    5. Raise activation fees.

    6. Raise the per minute cost of going over your plan amount.
  3. AJ

    AJ Guest

    Justin Green wrote:

    > Funny, but the personnel in the store can falsely represent that coverage is
    > excellent in an area, yet they hold you to a contract based on an oral
    > agreement.


    I take it you never bought a car from those honest salesman as
    opposed to those dishonest cell phone salesman. Or got out of the
    contract when it didn't get 50 MPG..

    AJ
  4. Opentoe

    Opentoe Guest

    A sales rep will lie through their teeth knowing there is no coverage in an
    area and telling you there is. When money is a factor, people will go to no
    lengths to get as much as they can of it. The sales reps are also not
    accountable for what they say, so it's a free for all when you go shopping
    for a cell service. Some of the largest companies in the world are based
    soley on fraud and inflated numbers. Only in America.

    "AL" <al145@nospam.hotmail.dot> wrote in message
    news:qFJ9b.379$y63.250@nwrddc03.gnilink.net...
    > I have never had so much heming and hawing as I did today. The new

    10-point
    > consumer information code is now in effect and signed by most cellular
    > companies. Point two says they will "provide coverage maps, illustrating
    > where service is generally available." Voluntary best practices my foot.
    >
    > So I called and asked for one. The rep. said it's in the brochure. I read
    > the line of the brochure that says "These maps show approximately where
    > rates apply based on our internal data." One brochure says "This rate map
    > shows where rates apply and is NOT (their emphasis) a depiction of actual
    > service availability or wireless coverage." Its VZW for those interested.
    >
    > The rep was speechless. Give them a call and see what happens.
    > The bottom line already they are breaking their pledges and this is an
    > industry that needs heavy regulation, tracking of dead spots and of
    > no-service and other service issues and problems.
    > Plus an actual real coverage map would be nice. But I don't think its

    going
    > to happen.
    > What was that FCC number again, oh yeah, 1-888-225-5322
    >
    > AL
    >
    >
    >
  5. Justin

    Justin Guest

    "O/Siris" <robjvargas@sprîntpcs.côm> wrote in message
    news:MPG.19d1ba43afb6b19098968f@netnews.comcast.net...
    In article <qFJ9b.379$y63.250@nwrddc03.gnilink.net>, al145
    @nospam.hotmail.dot says...
    > I have never had so much heming and hawing as I did today. The new

    10-point
    > consumer information code is now in effect and signed by most cellular
    > companies. Point two says they will "provide coverage maps, illustrating
    > where service is generally available." Voluntary best practices my foot.
    >


    "...where service is generally available."

    There's no specificity requirement to it. One of many reasons why that
    code is considered toothless.

    --
    -+-
    RØß
    O/Siris
    I work for SprintPCS
    I *don't* speak for them.

    Wow, if they get a phone to ring one out of a hundred times at 3:00 in the
    morning, they break out the map colors and start coloring.
  6. "BlahBlah Blabber" <blah_blah@blahblah.com> wrote in message
    news:vmf09951m2lf47@corp.supernews.com...
    > No. Who's Cletis? Related to Cooter?
    >
    > I'm posting to a news group not writing a dissertation. Always funny
    > how news group yahoos (like yourself) critique "language" as last
    > resort. "He can't spell therefore the message lacks credibiltiy."
    >
    > "He said the S word...." Well stick to sponge bob buddy. Don't go to a
    > rated PG movie.
    >
    > HS Drop out? Look at your language - Hardly Pulitzer material.
    > There's no need for the "do" and "High School" doesn't need to be
    > capitalized.
    >
    > Or is that capitolized? Hmmmm
    >



    I like you! Intelligent, educated and you take on the group trolls without
    hesitation :)

    Tom Veldhouse
  7. "David Little" <dalite01@sprynet.com> wrote in message
    news:msO9b.22973$Aq2.153@newsread1.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    >
    > I know that the towers aren't moving. Perhaps some maturity in the

    industry
    > would create a plateau where the whole mess could be re-evaluated to
    > discover just where the towers are an who owns them. But, this is still

    an
    > immature industry, and as such will always be prone to instability until

    it
    > matures to the point of stability. .
    >


    The data is all there and it is accessible. Otherwise, it would be
    impossible to bill a single roaming call.

    Tom Veldhouse
  8. 127.0.0.1

    127.0.0.1 Guest

    "BlahBlah Blabber" <blah_blah@blahblah.com> wrote in message
    news:vmficcobn9r5e0@corp.supernews.com...
    > If ther game is so stacked againt, why have the service. If it so full
    > of lies and deciet, why bother?
    >
    > BTW - the days when towers were self supporting structures on cement
    > pads that you describe are over. Although they exist, and will continue
    > to exist, its not the only place carriers have (and often share) towers.
    >
    > Anecdote - this is 100% true, no BS:
    >
    > Big storm, bad weather. Cell tower on a hill accessalbe by dirt road.
    > Cell tower is knocked out. Cell tower has A LOT of traffic compared to
    > other towers within the region. Cell Company shows up on scene w/in 8
    > hourss (still bad weather) to make repairs. Land owner says you ain't
    > driving on my property when its wet and muddy - i don't want the
    > ruts/erosion. Company offers to have gravel laid on site to prevent
    > ruts and erosion. Land owner says no way, you're waiting till its dry.
    > It ain't dry for several days. There ain't coverage for several days.


    this is true. if the tower is located in a business area, right of way
    access is limited to whatever that business owner has set. i have worked at
    a location that right of way access could only be performed after midnight.
    i would assume that towers leased on school property would also have limited
    right of way access (avoiding school recess time?).

    > Ancedote:
    >
    > I have satellite TV. I have to pay my bill every month and have a
    > contract. I have a contract because they gave me 2 recievers just to
    > sign up with them. Sometimes a storm blows through, I lose my satellite
    > tv. Do I call Direct TV to complain every single time? Do I demand
    > advanced alert when my service may be out?
    >
    > I have electricitly. Sometimes the electricity goes out. I have to pay
    > my electric bill everymonth.. I can switch providers but all they really
    > are are a reseller of the power comapny.....etc. etc. etc.
    >
    > I have cable tv. I have to pay my cable bill everymonth. sometimes the
    > cable goes out. etc. etc. etc.
    >
    > The milk is spilt. Quit crying. Your phone works better than itdid 10
    > years and works worse than it will in 10 years.
    >
    > --
    > The trivial wireless concerns of certain segments of the population is
    > totally amazing.


    when i had roadrunner cablemodem, the company would refund the down-time if
    it wasn't cause by nature or an act of terrorism. i presently have earthlink
    2-way satellite and they don't gauranty 100% uptime. i'm surprise that
    people view coverage maps as a precise evaluation. there is a difference
    between accuracy and precision. the coverage may be accurate, but may not be
    precise.

    opinion: i'm not sure if a coverage map is a gauranty of service. it just
    gives the consumer an idea of the service area. it is not uncommon to find
    pockets of dropped signals in covered service areas due to the
    terrain/buildings/geographical dead spots caused by unknown phnemenons. if a
    salesperson want to keep his/her job, it would be wise not to gauranty exact
    coverage.
  9. Justin

    Justin Guest

    "127.0.0.1" <unavailable@spam-me.not> wrote in message
    news:Sf_9b.27015$Aq2.56@newsread1.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    >
    > "BlahBlah Blabber" <blah_blah@blahblah.com> wrote in message
    > news:vmficcobn9r5e0@corp.supernews.com...
    > > If ther game is so stacked againt, why have the service. If it so full
    > > of lies and deciet, why bother?
    > >
    > > BTW - the days when towers were self supporting structures on cement
    > > pads that you describe are over. Although they exist, and will continue
    > > to exist, its not the only place carriers have (and often share) towers.
    > >
    > > Anecdote - this is 100% true, no BS:
    > >
    > > Big storm, bad weather. Cell tower on a hill accessalbe by dirt road.
    > > Cell tower is knocked out. Cell tower has A LOT of traffic compared to
    > > other towers within the region. Cell Company shows up on scene w/in 8
    > > hourss (still bad weather) to make repairs. Land owner says you ain't
    > > driving on my property when its wet and muddy - i don't want the
    > > ruts/erosion. Company offers to have gravel laid on site to prevent
    > > ruts and erosion. Land owner says no way, you're waiting till its dry.
    > > It ain't dry for several days. There ain't coverage for several days.

    >
    > this is true. if the tower is located in a business area, right of way
    > access is limited to whatever that business owner has set. i have worked

    at
    > a location that right of way access could only be performed after

    midnight.
    > i would assume that towers leased on school property would also have

    limited
    > right of way access (avoiding school recess time?).
    >
    > > Ancedote:
    > >
    > > I have satellite TV. I have to pay my bill every month and have a
    > > contract. I have a contract because they gave me 2 recievers just to
    > > sign up with them. Sometimes a storm blows through, I lose my satellite
    > > tv. Do I call Direct TV to complain every single time? Do I demand
    > > advanced alert when my service may be out?
    > >
    > > I have electricitly. Sometimes the electricity goes out. I have to pay
    > > my electric bill everymonth.. I can switch providers but all they really
    > > are are a reseller of the power comapny.....etc. etc. etc.
    > >
    > > I have cable tv. I have to pay my cable bill everymonth. sometimes the
    > > cable goes out. etc. etc. etc.
    > >
    > > The milk is spilt. Quit crying. Your phone works better than itdid 10
    > > years and works worse than it will in 10 years.
    > >
    > > --
    > > The trivial wireless concerns of certain segments of the population is
    > > totally amazing.

    >
    > when i had roadrunner cablemodem, the company would refund the down-time

    if
    > it wasn't cause by nature or an act of terrorism. i presently have

    earthlink
    > 2-way satellite and they don't gauranty 100% uptime. i'm surprise that
    > people view coverage maps as a precise evaluation. there is a difference
    > between accuracy and precision. the coverage may be accurate, but may not

    be
    > precise.
    >
    > opinion: i'm not sure if a coverage map is a gauranty of service. it just
    > gives the consumer an idea of the service area. it is not uncommon to find
    > pockets of dropped signals in covered service areas due to the
    > terrain/buildings/geographical dead spots caused by unknown phnemenons. if

    a
    > salesperson want to keep his/her job, it would be wise not to gauranty

    exact
    > coverage.



    Sometimes pockets are huge. Sometimes they continue advertising after their
    towers in surrounding areas are overloaded to the point where the cell
    shrinks.
  10. "PHil_Real" <phil_tape@email.org> wrote in message
    news:phil_tape-B5FE97.07342117092003@news02.west.earthlink.net...
    > In article <vmf6hn4nm6qc30@corp.supernews.com>,
    > CellAcademician@NOXXhotmailXXNO.com (Cell Academician) wrote:
    >
    > > lately@late.com (cell play) wrote in article
    > > <vmf5j9em2sr689@corp.supernews.com>:
    > > > Got me on what? I care about my costs and end product. Just like the
    > > > many frivolous lawsuits filed in America every day, those costs are
    > > > reflected in our premiums. Calling customer service to ask about

    every
    > > > plank of the Consumer code to get a rise costs $7. Do you think
    > > > cellular companies eat that cost? If you do, you're naive. It's
    > > > reflected in plan costs.

    > >
    > > Actually, you are naive. Plan costs are not computed by
    > > some formula based on the cost of providing service.
    > > The plans are priced according to the market. The reason
    > > that there are so many different plans is that the carrier
    > > is attempting to both not lose subscribers based on price,
    > > but not leave money on the able from subscribers for
    > > whom price is not an over-riding issue.
    > >
    > > Furthermore, even if dividing the cost of customer
    > > service by the total calls, comes out to $7, this does
    > > not mean that the incremental cost of another call is
    > > $7, in reality the incremental cost is close to zero.

    >
    > But if the base cost of service (Towers, Phone subsidy, Customer
    > Service, Administrative Overhead, Marketing, Billing) is say $50 per
    > customer, and you have plans that start at $29.99 for competitive
    > reasons; you have a problem. One factor all cell companies compute is
    > revenue per customer. If your costs are say $50, and your average
    > revenue is less than that because of all the $29.99 customers, or you're
    > giving out too many 25% discounts to corporate customers on $60 plans,
    > then (like SprintPCS) you're losing money.


    All true, but they way the company looks at it is that every extra $30 is
    an extra $30, that requires only a tiny extra expeniture to support. They
    only get into trouble when they take on more customers than the network
    can support, but they'll worry about that later. Cingular got into trouble
    with this in 2001 when their Special Olympics promotion proved wildly
    popular, and their California network became seriously overloaded.

    It's naive to think that the price of a product is determined by the cost
    of manufacturing it or providing it. The price is determined by the market.
    Look at the U.S. car companies that lose money on every compact and
    mid-size vehicle, but they can't exit that market because of government
    regulations on fuel economy. Yet they can't charge more than their
    competition such as Honda and Toyota (who incidentally manufacture
    these vehicles in the U.S. as well (actually the so-called U.S.
    manufacturers
    manufacture a lot of these vehicles in Mexico)).

    Eventually, if a company's costs are higher than they can charge for
    a product, they go out of business. They can't raise their prices to
    recover costs if the competition is priced lower.
  11. cell play

    cell play Guest

    Gotcha. You ask if I work for a living and then you waste probably an
    hour composing your post. Genius! My whole theme to my original post
    is why post a message to have people call and waste CS time about a
    question that we all know the answer to. If the person had read the
    consumer code, then his question would've been invalid. He stated that
    the consumer code was already being broken. How so? The website was
    updated immediately. It will take time to reprint brochures with
    correct wording. All compnies will need a grace period to get the
    proper material out to the stores. I'm not defending any company, but
    the industry. Things don't happen over night.

    I was just questioning the validity of his post and his statements. But
    because I do have a job and I do work for a living, I'm done. Obviously
    there are people on here that I would guess live in their mom's basement
    and have nothing better to do than to post to multiple news group all
    day.

    "David Little" <dalite01@sprynet.com> wrote in article
    <aKO9b.23089$Aq2.9481@newsread1.news.atl.earthlink.net>:
    > Now here is the beginning of the perfect marriage between Mr. Paradox and
    > Ms. Oxy-Moron.
    >
    > It is wrong to expect a company to produce, so we are to be criticized when
    > we expect it.
    >
    > When we ask a company to live up to their promises, we are accused of making
    > them spend more money and raising the rates of others; and they still don't
    > comply.
    >
    > You care about CS costs to the point that it is easier to complain about
    > costs and never correct the problem than to spend the money to correct the
    > problem and avoid the CS costs.
    >
    > More productive : Go along to get along? That did Reginald Denny a lot of
    > good, didn't it? Talk about getting your cake, eating it, and then
    > complaining about the stomach ache. Want some cheese with that whine?
    >
    > Oh, and anyone that is "goaded" into expecting to get what they were
    > promised in exchange for their monthly rate payment is a moron? So much for
    > integrity...
    >
    > And lastly, anyone who tries to get a company to do what they promised is
    > suspect of loosing IQ points for doing so? Do you read your posts before
    > you make them? I guess this is what we are will have to learn to expect in
    > the future. Anything goes, and those who complain are less than human.
    > Ever thought about working for a living?
    >
    > "cell play" <lately@late.com> wrote in message
    > news:vmf5j9em2sr689@corp.supernews.com...
    > > Got me on what? I care about my costs and end product. Just like the
    > > many frivolous lawsuits filed in America every day, those costs are
    > > reflected in our premiums. Calling customer service to ask about every
    > > plank of the Consumer code to get a rise costs $7. Do you think
    > > cellular companies eat that cost? If you do, you're naive. It's
    > > reflected in plan costs. All I'm saying is to spend your time doing
    > > something more productive and quit wasting everyone's money, just like
    > > you've wasted my time to prove that your statement about calling
    > > customer care is idiotic. The sad thing is your statements probably
    > > goaded some other moronic individuals (like PHil.... my nutz) into
    > > calling customer care, thusly compounding the wasted time and money with
    > > unneccessary calls to cust care.
    > >
    > > Have a good day genius.
    > >
    > > "AL" <al145@nospam.hotmail.dot> wrote in article
    > > <PUL9b.1895$uF3.222@nwrddc01.gnilink.net>:
    > > > Yep, torment small simple minds like yours... And I gotcha :)
    > > >
    > > > AL
    > > >
    > > > p.s. The brochure was June of 2003 if anyone caress. But they signed the
    > > > Code, now the have to produce, but they won't, not for many moons.
    > > >
    > > > "cell play" <lately@late.com> wrote in message
    > > > news:vmevc33ipto3e0@corp.supernews.com...
    > > > > Hey AL, you're a moron. Look on their website, the map has changed

    > and
    > > > > is much clearer. Every carrier has the same thing on all their

    > coverage
    > > > > maps. And it is an approximation due to the fact that cellular

    > service
    > > > > and signal strength can vary based upon many conditions, including
    > > > > weather. All in all, don't you have anything better to do?
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > > [posted via phonescoop.com]

    >
    >


    [posted via phonescoop.com]
  12. PHil_Real

    PHil_Real Guest

    In article <0f5f485101d5413c415121dcd7272390@news.teranews.com>,
    "Justin" <justin@cjteam.com> wrote:

    >
    > Sometimes pockets are huge. Sometimes they continue advertising after their
    > towers in surrounding areas are overloaded to the point where the cell
    > shrinks.


    Thats because the maps are drawn by marketing people.
  13. PHil_Real

    PHil_Real Guest

    In article <Sf_9b.27015$Aq2.56@newsread1.news.atl.earthlink.net>,
    "127.0.0.1" <unavailable@spam-me.not> wrote:

    > this is true. if the tower is located in a business area, right of way
    > access is limited to whatever that business owner has set.


    Right of way is llimited by whatever contract the Tower Builder agrees
    to. If they agree to limit their necessary access, whose fault is that?

    I used to be in the oil inudstry and saw the exact same issues with
    access to drilling sites and oil/gas wells on lands the oil/gas company
    had minreal rights to. They usually negociated themselves airtight
    leases that gave them the access they might ever need.
  14. John

    John Guest

    "David Little" <dalite01@sprynet.com> wrote in message
    news:WYT9b.26306$NM1.19287@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    > I can go along with part of that premise, but it is somewhat like "I don't
    > know how many grandchildren she has, but I doubt that she can keep each

    one
    > from murdering their next-door neighbor; and for that they should not be
    > punished for the crime".


    Um...that's completely different. In your case, the grandchild is the one
    doing the murdering, and that specific one will be punished. Not the
    grandmother. The grandmother has no control of the grandchildren, so won't
    be punished. The grandchildren, presumbably, do have control over their
    actions, so will be punished. Sprint, however, has no control over where
    the Times (and its ads) go, so can't/shouldn't be held responsible if their
    ads end up in Little Town USA.

    To respond to Justin, they do have complete control over their maps and
    those should be reasonably accurate. The reason why I asked how big Little
    Elm is because if Little Elm is one square mile and the entire surrounding
    area is covered (basically a dead spot), I'd be more willing to let the map
    inaccuracy slide. If Little Elm is the size of NYC and the whole thing is
    not covered, that'd be unforgivable. Another thing is if Little Elm is on
    the fringe of the coverage map.

    > No one here is asking cellular providers to defy gravity or make time go
    > backwards. All anyone here is asking is that they advertise based on

    truth,
    > not fantasy; and that they be willing to stand behind their individual and
    > collective actions.


    No problem with that. Just as long as you crucify them based on things they
    can actually do something about.
  15. PHil_Real

    PHil_Real Guest

    In article <TI_9b.6416$UN4.179@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net>,
    "Steven M. Scharf" <scharf.steven@linkearth.net> wrote:

    > It's naive to think that the price of a product is determined by the cost
    > of manufacturing it or providing it. The price is determined by the market.
    > Look at the U.S. car companies that lose money on every compact and
    > mid-size vehicle, but they can't exit that market because of government
    > regulations on fuel economy. Yet they can't charge more than their
    > competition such as Honda and Toyota (who incidentally manufacture
    > these vehicles in the U.S. as well (actually the so-called U.S.
    > manufacturers
    > manufacture a lot of these vehicles in Mexico)).
    >
    > Eventually, if a company's costs are higher than they can charge for
    > a product, they go out of business. They can't raise their prices to
    > recover costs if the competition is priced lower.


    Luckily there's $10,000 profit in a typical Explorer, TrailBlazer or
    Durango.
  16. The mandated maps will appear in stores on September 29th. Temporary
    maps should be available in stores today.

    "AL" <al145@nospam.hotmail.dot> wrote in article
    <qFJ9b.379$y63.250@nwrddc03.gnilink.net>:
    > I have never had so much heming and hawing as I did today. The new 10-point
    > consumer information code is now in effect and signed by most cellular
    > companies. Point two says they will "provide coverage maps, illustrating
    > where service is generally available." Voluntary best practices my foot.
    >
    > So I called and asked for one. The rep. said it's in the brochure. I read
    > the line of the brochure that says "These maps show approximately where
    > rates apply based on our internal data." One brochure says "This rate map
    > shows where rates apply and is NOT (their emphasis) a depiction of actual
    > service availability or wireless coverage." Its VZW for those interested.
    >
    > The rep was speechless. Give them a call and see what happens.
    > The bottom line already they are breaking their pledges and this is an
    > industry that needs heavy regulation, tracking of dead spots and of
    > no-service and other service issues and problems.
    > Plus an actual real coverage map would be nice. But I don't think its going
    > to happen.
    > What was that FCC number again, oh yeah, 1-888-225-5322
    >
    > AL
    >
    >
    >


    [posted via phonescoop.com]
  17. PHil_Real

    PHil_Real Guest

    In article <vmh01l89558m78@corp.supernews.com>,
    lately@late.com (cell play) wrote:

    > Gotcha. You ask if I work for a living and then you waste probably an
    > hour composing your post. Genius! My whole theme to my original post
    > is why post a message to have people call and waste CS time about a
    > question that we all know the answer to. If the person had read the
    > consumer code, then his question would've been invalid. He stated that
    > the consumer code was already being broken. How so? The website was
    > updated immediately. It will take time to reprint brochures with
    > correct wording. All compnies will need a grace period to get the
    > proper material out to the stores. I'm not defending any company, but
    > the industry. Things don't happen over night.


    The SprintPCS maps on the SPRINTPCS website have gotten worse instead of
    better. In the cities I know, Its now a smaller scale map, a hundred
    miles across is a good as one can enlarge it, and the person who colored
    areas in went bezerk. Obviously done by marketing, with no thought of
    the new Cunsumer code.
  18. Quick

    Quick Guest

    "David Little" <dalite01@sprynet.com> wrote

    > Look what that got us; the legislation around
    > mid 1990s that makes it a felony to have a scanner that isn't cell

    blocked.

    What!? I thought it was simply that they couldn't sell them (or agreed not
    to)...
    How am I going to get that resister that I snipped out of my BearCat scanner
    back in there?

    -Quick
  19. Mike James

    Mike James Guest

    Check out the disclaimer on the Verizon Wireless website with regard to
    coverage:

    "This map is not a guarentee of coverage and contains area with no
    service"

    Plus, how much has the AC map shrunk in the last few months...

    But yes... It is fun to play with customer service, but I prefer Sprint
    PCS Customer Service... They are the stupidist most ignorant untrained
    individuals on the face of the earth... Although Verizon customer
    service has been deteriorating over the last year...




    "Justin" <justin@cjteam.com> wrote in article
    <274cd33ef2f214c4a319a281b56329c8@news.teranews.com>:
    >
    > "O/Siris" <robjvargas@sprîntpcs.côm> wrote in message
    > news:MPG.19d1ba43afb6b19098968f@netnews.comcast.net...
    > In article <qFJ9b.379$y63.250@nwrddc03.gnilink.net>, al145
    > @nospam.hotmail.dot says...
    > > I have never had so much heming and hawing as I did today. The new

    > 10-point
    > > consumer information code is now in effect and signed by most cellular
    > > companies. Point two says they will "provide coverage maps, illustrating
    > > where service is generally available." Voluntary best practices my foot.
    > >

    >
    > "...where service is generally available."
    >
    > There's no specificity requirement to it. One of many reasons why that
    > code is considered toothless.
    >
    > --
    > -+-
    > RØß
    > O/Siris
    > I work for SprintPCS
    > I *don't* speak for them.
    >
    > Wow, if they get a phone to ring one out of a hundred times at 3:00 in the
    > morning, they break out the map colors and start coloring.
    >
    >


    [posted via phonescoop.com]
  20. Justin

    Justin Guest

    "John" <invalid@invalid.com> wrote in message
    news:NPqcneLNYK-9F_WiXTWJkg@comcast.com...
    >
    > "David Little" <dalite01@sprynet.com> wrote in message
    > news:WYT9b.26306$NM1.19287@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    > > I can go along with part of that premise, but it is somewhat like "I

    don't
    > > know how many grandchildren she has, but I doubt that she can keep each

    > one
    > > from murdering their next-door neighbor; and for that they should not be
    > > punished for the crime".

    >
    > Um...that's completely different. In your case, the grandchild is the one
    > doing the murdering, and that specific one will be punished. Not the
    > grandmother. The grandmother has no control of the grandchildren, so

    won't
    > be punished. The grandchildren, presumbably, do have control over their
    > actions, so will be punished. Sprint, however, has no control over where
    > the Times (and its ads) go, so can't/shouldn't be held responsible if

    their
    > ads end up in Little Town USA.
    >
    > To respond to Justin, they do have complete control over their maps and
    > those should be reasonably accurate. The reason why I asked how big

    Little
    > Elm is because if Little Elm is one square mile and the entire surrounding
    > area is covered (basically a dead spot), I'd be more willing to let the

    map
    > inaccuracy slide. If Little Elm is the size of NYC and the whole thing is
    > not covered, that'd be unforgivable. Another thing is if Little Elm is on
    > the fringe of the coverage map.




    Little Elm's about five to seven miles north and south, and about four miles
    east and west. But the dead spot extends north outside of Little Elm city
    limits for another 4 or 5 miles. All of this is pretty clearly *not* on the
    edge of the map.

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