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What is the technology behind WLNP?

Discussion in 'alt.cellular.verizon' started by CK, Dec 2, 2003.

  1. "Aboutdakota" <aboutdakota@hot-mail.com> wrote in message
    news:3FD2D206.6000103@hot-mail.com...
    >
    >
    > Al Klein wrote:
    > > On Fri, 05 Dec 2003 02:57:31 GMT, Stanley Cline <sc1-news@roamer1.org>
    > > posted in alt.cellular.verizon:
    > >
    > >
    > >>FWIW, I can count the number of wireless carriers that have actually
    > >>shut down their network on one finger -- Carolina Phone in South
    > >>Carolina, which shut down their network and sold their spectrum in a
    > >>three-way split to SunCom, VZW, and T-Mo (CP's bean counters figured
    > >>they could get more money from selling licenses than selling service)
    > >>is the only one I know of that has.

    > >
    > >
    > > Marked Tree, Arkansas, but we're going back to the days of MTS.

    >
    > What does MTS stand for in this instance?
    >
    > ==AD


    Mobile Telephone Service. It was followed by Improved Mobile Telephone
    Service, and Advanced Mobile Phone Service (IMTS and AMPS).

    MTS worked by going off-hook and hearing, "Number, please."
    The improvement of IMTS was adding a rotary dial to the control head
    of the trunk mount radio. I installed several GEs and Motorolas when
    I worked at a two-way radio shop while a high school junior and
    senior, 1971-2.

    John C.



    › See More: What is the technology behind WLNP?
  2. Isaiah Beard

    Isaiah Beard Guest

    Aboutdakota wrote:

    >>
    >> Marked Tree, Arkansas, but we're going back to the days of MTS.

    >
    >
    > What does MTS stand for in this instance?


    Mobile Telephone Service. If AMPS (analog) cell service was the "start"
    of cellular telephone service as we know it today, then MTS and IMTS
    (the "I" stood for "Improved") were the "prehistoric" versions. With
    (I)MTS, there were no such thing as "cell sites," rather, it was just
    one transmitter per channel placed high up around the general center of
    the city, and the hope was to cover the entire area with that one site.
    MTS started with 9 channels in the 35-45Mhz range, and later expanded
    to 11 channels in the 150Mhz band, analog of course. IMTS had 12
    channels in the 450 MHz range. Most small cities only used 1 to 3
    channels, though.

    Oh yeah, and the phones weren't exactly the pocketable wonders we have
    today. MTS versions were the car mounted variety that used vacuum tubes
    and could output 30 watts of transmit power. Early models didn't
    automatically select the first available channel; you had to do that
    yourself.

    Oh, and they didn't dial, either. With MTS, you picked up the phone and
    gave the number you wanted to reach to an operator, who would put the
    call in for you.

    IMTS kind of improved on this. It was similar to MTS, but you *could*
    dial the number yourself, and some models did automatic channel
    selection. Much later versions were transistorized and some even used
    IC chips. For info on a later version, see:

    http://www.privateline.com/IMTS/briefcasephotos.htm

    And if you think cell service isn't the best today, consider the IMTS
    user. If you wanted mobile phone service prior to 1982, you could end
    up on a four year long (!) waiting list. The subscriber equipment
    costed thousands of dollars, and the service itself wasn't cheap either.
    In the early '80s, just before AMPS cellular finally came online,
    plans usually had a base fee around $17-$25 a month which included ZERO
    (0) minutes. That's around $30 to $45 in 2003 money. And airtime costs
    were around $.50 for the first 1 to 4 minutes of a call, and up to $1.00
    for each additional minute.... in 1982 dollars, that is. Today that
    would be around $.90 and $2.00, respectively... more than we pay today
    to roam on analog.

    The idea behind this type of rate structure was to get people to make
    the quickest calls possible, and to not linger on the phone. Why?
    Because 12 channels in even the largest cities for just a few hundred
    users meant LOTS of "network busy" signals. Needless to say, there was
    no such thing as unlimited off-peak minutes, or unlimited "IMTS-to-IMTS"
    minutes, no matter how much you were willing to pay for such a luxury.
    And if you asked for nationwide long distance to be included in your
    plan price, I'm sure you'd be laughed at. :)



    --
    E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.
  3. Al Klein

    Al Klein Guest

    On Sun, 07 Dec 2003 01:08:54 -0600, Aboutdakota
    <aboutdakota@hot-mail.com> posted in alt.cellular.verizon:

    >Al Klein wrote:
    >> On Fri, 05 Dec 2003 02:57:31 GMT, Stanley Cline <sc1-news@roamer1.org>
    >> posted in alt.cellular.verizon:


    >>>FWIW, I can count the number of wireless carriers that have actually
    >>>shut down their network on one finger -- Carolina Phone in South
    >>>Carolina, which shut down their network and sold their spectrum in a
    >>>three-way split to SunCom, VZW, and T-Mo (CP's bean counters figured
    >>>they could get more money from selling licenses than selling service)
    >>>is the only one I know of that has.


    >> Marked Tree, Arkansas, but we're going back to the days of MTS.


    >What does MTS stand for in this instance?


    Mobile Telephone Service. You keyed the mic, said "mobile operator?"
    and waited for a response, or until you got tired of waiting and tried
    again. I seem to recall that it went to duplex before IMTS (Improved
    Mobile Telephone Service - a dial on the control head so you could
    dial your own calls - came out, but the memory's a bit hazy.
  4. Al Klein

    Al Klein Guest

    On Sun, 7 Dec 2003 01:27:45 -0600, "John Cummings"
    <n4bkn.no@spam.bellsouth.net> posted in alt.cellular.verizon:

    >MTS worked by going off-hook and hearing, "Number, please."


    What telephone company were YOU working with? In NYC, if you got the
    operator on the first try you might as well bet on a horse at random -
    it would probably win at 50:1 odds. But just keying up and getting a
    response? I can't recall that happening more than once or twice.

    The marine operators were a little better - boats could have
    emergencies with no help around.
  5. Al Klein

    Al Klein Guest

    On Sun, 07 Dec 2003 11:23:09 -0500, Isaiah Beard
    <sacredpoet@sacredpoet.com> posted in alt.cellular.verizon:

    >Oh yeah, and the phones weren't exactly the pocketable wonders we have
    >today. MTS versions were the car mounted variety that used vacuum tubes
    >and could output 30 watts of transmit power.


    I don't remember the manufacturer, but there was an all-transistor MTS
    box (I don't remember whether the final was tube or transistor) that I
    had in my car during the late 60s or early 70s. Put 30 watts into the
    duplexer, and it was small enough to mount under the dash, if you
    didn't mind reducing the seating to 2 in the front. (We had bench
    seats in those days, remember.)

    >And if you think cell service isn't the best today, consider the IMTS
    >user. If you wanted mobile phone service prior to 1982, you could end
    >up on a four year long (!) waiting list.


    Which is why a lot of NYC MTS phones were Marked Tree, Arkansas
    registry. :)

    >The subscriber equipment
    >costed thousands of dollars, and the service itself wasn't cheap either.
    > In the early '80s, just before AMPS cellular finally came online,
    >plans usually had a base fee around $17-$25 a month which included ZERO
    >(0) minutes. That's around $30 to $45 in 2003 money. And airtime costs
    >were around $.50 for the first 1 to 4 minutes of a call, and up to $1.00
    >for each additional minute.... in 1982 dollars, that is. Today that
    >would be around $.90 and $2.00, respectively... more than we pay today
    >to roam on analog.


    And that's in the 80s. The prices were about the same in the 60s, but
    money was worth a lot more, so the prices, relative to earnings, were
    much higher. ($10,000 was a great annual salary through the 60s.
    Most people didn't come close to that.)
  6. Jer

    Jer Guest

    Al Klein wrote:


    > Mobile Telephone Service. You keyed the mic, said "mobile operator?"
    > and waited for a response, or until you got tired of waiting and tried
    > again. I seem to recall that it went to duplex before IMTS (Improved
    > Mobile Telephone Service - a dial on the control head so you could
    > dial your own calls - came out, but the memory's a bit hazy.



    Sure, full duplex was available on the Moto TLD-1100. I had two, the
    UHF-IMTS one on Bell and the VHF-MTS on cheap-ass RCC.


    --
    jer email reply - I am not a 'ten' ICQ = 35253273
    "All that we do is touched with ocean, yet we remain on the shore of
    what we know." -- Richard Wilbur

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