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What's with the "can you hear me now" guy?

Discussion in 'alt.cellular.verizon' started by PistolPete, Oct 2, 2003.

  1. PistolPete

    PistolPete Guest

    Verizon can't really test their network this way? It's totally non-
    technical. What if they could not hear him, what would he do? Does he carry
    a GPS system? I would think that network testing would involve much more
    sophisticated equipment and procedures.
     



    › See More: What's with the "can you hear me now" guy?
  2. Jim Williams

    Jim Williams Guest

    The "real" guy was on one of the TV news shows (I don't remember which one)
    awhile back. He drives a car around wired with six phones (both Verizon and
    competors). Signal and location information is stored on a computer - all
    he has to do is drive.

    "PistolPete" <ppete@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:Xns94092EF833C9pegomaccom@199.184.165.241...
    > Verizon can't really test their network this way? It's totally non-
    > technical. What if they could not hear him, what would he do? Does he

    carry
    > a GPS system? I would think that network testing would involve much more
    > sophisticated equipment and procedures.
     
  3. N9WOS

    N9WOS Guest

    > Verizon can't really test their network this way? It's totally non-
    > technical. What if they could not hear him, what would he do? Does he

    carry
    > a GPS system? I would think that network testing would involve much more
    > sophisticated equipment and procedures.


    They probably do test their network that way.
    It would explain a lot about verizon. :)
     
  4. Rich

    Rich Guest

    PistolPete wrote:
    > Verizon can't really test their network this way? It's totally non-
    > technical. What if they could not hear him, what would he do? Does he carry
    > a GPS system? I would think that network testing would involve much more
    > sophisticated equipment and procedures.


    The can you hear me now guy is just an advertising person. Click here
    http://www.verizonwireless.com/b2c/aboutUs/imagegallery/networkQuality.jsp
    to see some pictures of the true test equipment.

    Rich
     
  5. CharlesH

    CharlesH Guest

    In article <Xns94092EF833C9pegomaccom@199.184.165.241>,
    PistolPete <ppete@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >Verizon can't really test their network this way? It's totally non-
    >technical. What if they could not hear him, what would he do? Does he carry
    >a GPS system? I would think that network testing would involve much more
    >sophisticated equipment and procedures.


    In this newsgroup we have heard from real "Can you hear me now?" people.
    They are not nerds carrying a cell phone saying "Can you hear me now?".
    They are people driving trucks full of test equipment, including GPS.
     
  6. N9WOS

    N9WOS Guest


    > The can you hear me now guy is just an advertising person. Click here
    > http://www.verizonwireless.com/b2c/aboutUs/imagegallery/networkQuality.jsp
    > to see some pictures of the true test equipment.


    What??????????????
    You have got to be kidding me......
    That antenna placement is will not give anything close
    to accurate data.

    It looks like they are setting them as quarter wave
    dipoles mounted on the roof top.
    That will give you a good 3db gain over a
    free space half wave dipole.

    It won't even be comparable to a phone
    using it's internal antenna in free space.
    Let alone being inside the car.

    The antennas on the outer edge of the roof will
    have a horribly distorted pattern.

    And being on a metal ground plane, the
    low angle takeoff levels will be leagues better than
    in a normal environment with a soil ground plane
    or in free space.

    They need the antennas elevated above the roof top
    with a RF absorbing layer covering the roof top.

    That will give you something "close" to useable results.
     
  7. About Dakota

    About Dakota Guest

    N9WOS wrote:
    >>Verizon can't really test their network this way? It's totally non-
    >>technical. What if they could not hear him, what would he do? Does he

    >
    > carry
    >
    >>a GPS system? I would think that network testing would involve much more
    >>sophisticated equipment and procedures.

    >
    >
    > They probably do test their network that way.
    > It would explain a lot about verizon. :)


    It would explain a lot about Verizon, except when he gets to the upper
    midwest (ND, SD, MT, NE, WY). What does he do when the call is dropped
    every 15 miles?

    AD
     
  8. Mij Adyaw

    Mij Adyaw Guest

    Yes,

    But they are still Geeks (Geek is the politically correct term for "nerd")

    "CharlesH" <hoch@exemplary.invalid> wrote in message
    news:bliv3u21hnn@enews2.newsguy.com...
    > In article <Xns94092EF833C9pegomaccom@199.184.165.241>,
    > PistolPete <ppete@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > >Verizon can't really test their network this way? It's totally non-
    > >technical. What if they could not hear him, what would he do? Does he

    carry
    > >a GPS system? I would think that network testing would involve much more
    > >sophisticated equipment and procedures.

    >
    > In this newsgroup we have heard from real "Can you hear me now?" people.
    > They are not nerds carrying a cell phone saying "Can you hear me now?".
    > They are people driving trucks full of test equipment, including GPS.
     
  9. Mike

    Mike Guest

    On Fri, 03 Oct 2003 04:54:32 GMT, "N9WOS"
    <n9wos@nobug.worldnet.att.net> wrote:

    >
    >
    >> The can you hear me now guy is just an advertising person. Click here
    >> http://www.verizonwireless.com/b2c/aboutUs/imagegallery/networkQuality.jsp
    >> to see some pictures of the true test equipment.

    >
    >What??????????????
    >You have got to be kidding me......
    >That antenna placement is will not give anything close
    >to accurate data.


    Holy crap...you'd better call Verizon Wireless, and fast!

    I bet they'd love to know that their multi-billion dollar network
    expansion and maintenance program - which is based somewhat on data
    gathered by these folks - is based on a house of cards.

    ;)

    Mike
     
  10. singha_lvr

    singha_lvr Guest

    "PistolPete" <ppete@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:Xns94092EF833C9pegomaccom@199.184.165.241...
    > Verizon can't really test their network this way? It's totally non-
    > technical. What if they could not hear him, what would he do? Does he

    carry
    > a GPS system? I would think that network testing would involve much more
    > sophisticated equipment and procedures.


    My friend is a fairly high ranking employee with verizion. HE occasionally
    does something similar to this. Yes, it's more technical than that but the
    basic premise is the same.

    (I still bust his chops on it ... he's not amused.)
     
  11. P Howard

    P Howard Guest

    http://www.verizonwireless.com/b2c/bestNetwork/index.jsp

    --
    Verizon customer/ formerly Cingular user/ formerly Sprint PCS user


    About Dakota <aboutdakota@REMOVEMEhotmail.com> wrote in article
    <3F7D0C4A.5080703@REMOVEMEhotmail.com>:
    >
    >
    > N9WOS wrote:
    > >>Verizon can't really test their network this way? It's totally non-
    > >>technical. What if they could not hear him, what would he do? Does he

    > >
    > > carry
    > >
    > >>a GPS system? I would think that network testing would involve much more
    > >>sophisticated equipment and procedures.

    > >
    > >
    > > They probably do test their network that way.
    > > It would explain a lot about verizon. :)

    >
    > It would explain a lot about Verizon, except when he gets to the upper
    > midwest (ND, SD, MT, NE, WY). What does he do when the call is dropped
    > every 15 miles?
    >
    > AD
    >


    [posted via phonescoop.com]
     
  12. MikeM

    MikeM Guest

    Well he needs to come up here to the mountain cause I can't hear him
    now!

    --
    Mike Moore
    Computer Services Technician
    Snow Summit Mt. Resort
    Office (909) 866-5766 Ext.270
    mikemoore@ www.snowsummit.com
    Contact info not for share, rent or distribution.


    "N9WOS" <n9wos@nobug.worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
    news:wW6fb.167559$3o3.12137315@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    | > Verizon can't really test their network this way? It's totally non-
    | > technical. What if they could not hear him, what would he do? Does
    he
    | carry
    | > a GPS system? I would think that network testing would involve much
    more
    | > sophisticated equipment and procedures.
    |
    | They probably do test their network that way.
    | It would explain a lot about verizon. :)
    |
    |
     
  13. N9WOS

    N9WOS Guest


    > >What??????????????
    > >You have got to be kidding me......
    > >That antenna placement is will not give anything close
    > >to accurate data.

    >
    > Holy crap...you'd better call Verizon Wireless, and fast!
    >
    > I bet they'd love to know that their multi-billion dollar network
    > expansion and maintenance program - which is based somewhat on data
    > gathered by these folks - is based on a house of cards.
    >
    > ;)


    Here is a nice PDF that shows a bit of what I am talking about.

    http://www.kathrein.de/de/mca/techn-infos/download/BasicAntenna.pdf

    Figure 27 through 31 should get the point across.
    And he is basing it upon antennas which have an intrinsic
    elevation above the car roof.
    The ones on the test car roof have no intrinsic elevation.
    So their radiation pattern will be influenced even more by roof.
    Their radiation pattern will make the ones in the PDF look clean.

    The ones that put that test car together evidently has zero RF experience.
     
  14. FLUG PoP

    FLUG PoP Guest

    >Well he needs to come up here to the mountain cause I can't hear him
    >now!
    >
    >--
    >Mike Moore


    Mike I have to agree with you on that. I did a live broadcast up there last
    year with you guys and had NO Verizon coveage up there. I had to force my phone
    to roam on Sprint in order to get service. Which worked ok. Sprint covers alot
    of the Ski resorts up in the mountain areas of Southern Cal.










    There's always a smart ass in the crowd.. Remove NOSPAM to respond
     
  15. Mike

    Mike Guest

    On Fri, 03 Oct 2003 16:23:19 GMT, "N9WOS"
    <n9wos@nobug.worldnet.att.net> wrote:

    >The ones that put that test car together evidently has zero RF experience.


    So, what good are the "test men"? Why do they spend all that time,
    money and gas?

    Mike
     
  16. John Antypas

    John Antypas Guest

    Actually, having worked for Verizon in the early CDMA days, I can tell
    you -- we used to call it "Drive By Testing". Litterally, we'd have people
    in vans driving around watching equipment.

    "PistolPete" <ppete@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:Xns94092EF833C9pegomaccom@199.184.165.241...
    > Verizon can't really test their network this way? It's totally non-
    > technical. What if they could not hear him, what would he do? Does he

    carry
    > a GPS system? I would think that network testing would involve much more
    > sophisticated equipment and procedures.
     
  17. N9WOS

    N9WOS Guest

    > >The ones that put that test car together evidently has zero RF
    experience.
    >
    > So, what good are the "test men"? Why do they spend all that time,
    > money and gas?
    >
    > Mike


    One word...... Media..............
    There something to put in the spot light.
    They can say they are doing something.
    AKA.. advertising.

    If they actually use the information is questionable.
    If they actually trust the data, then they are running
    around half blind.
    Blinded by their own ignorance.

    Now that I think about it, the test guy on TV would probably
    be a better testing method than that test vehicle.

    How ironic.
     
  18. MikeM

    MikeM Guest

    "FLUG PoP" <flugpop@aol.comNOSPAM> wrote in message
    news:20031003131325.06822.00000169@mb-m20.aol.com...
    | >Well he needs to come up here to the mountain cause I can't hear him
    | >now!
    | >
    | >--
    | >Mike Moore
    |
    | Mike I have to agree with you on that. I did a live broadcast up there
    last
    | year with you guys and had NO Verizon coveage up there. I had to force
    my phone
    | to roam on Sprint in order to get service. Which worked ok. Sprint
    covers alot
    | of the Ski resorts up in the mountain areas of Southern Cal.
    |
    |
    |
    |
    |
    |
    |
    |
    |
    |
    | There's always a smart ass in the crowd.. Remove NOSPAM to respond

    Actually my VX6000 gets better coverage than any of the other Verizon
    service phones we have on site. All the other services have even worse
    coverage between our 2 locations. One may work at Bear but it wont at
    Summit and Vise Versa. I hope we get another tower up here near the west
    end soon. Then all will be well.
     
  19. Hopper

    Hopper Guest

    "PistolPete" <ppete@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:Xns94092EF833C9pegomaccom@199.184.165.241...
    > Verizon can't really test their network this way? It's totally non-
    > technical. What if they could not hear him, what would he do? Does he

    carry
    > a GPS system? I would think that network testing would involve much more
    > sophisticated equipment and procedures.


    That is a commercial. It is not real.
     
  20. Quaoar

    Quaoar Guest

    About Dakota wrote:
    > N9WOS wrote:
    >>> Verizon can't really test their network this way? It's totally non-
    >>> technical. What if they could not hear him, what would he do? Does
    >>> he

    >>
    >> carry
    >>
    >>> a GPS system? I would think that network testing would involve much
    >>> more sophisticated equipment and procedures.

    >>
    >>
    >> They probably do test their network that way.
    >> It would explain a lot about verizon. :)

    >
    > It would explain a lot about Verizon, except when he gets to the upper
    > midwest (ND, SD, MT, NE, WY). What does he do when the call is
    > dropped every 15 miles?
    >
    > AD


    Well, first of all ND does not exist. The rest of these states have one
    house every 20 miles. Seriously, with the low population density in
    these states, it's remarkable that there is any cell service at all. or
    landline telephone. Thank god for Wal-Mart and PamIda.

    Q
     

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