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Why Larry gets crap (back)

Discussion in 'alt.cellular.verizon' started by Richard Ness, Nov 11, 2003.

  1. N9WOS

    N9WOS Guest

    > C:\DOS
    > C:\DOS\RUN
    > RUN\DOS\RUN
    >
    > Windows 95:
    > A 32 bit application on top of
    > A 16 bit operating system running on
    > An 8 bit computer emulating
    > A 4 bit architecture written by
    > A 2 bit company that won't stand
    > One bit of competition


    LOL.

    One think that a lot of people don't know is that
    there never was really an 8bit PC.

    The original base processor is an 8086.
    It's has a 16 bit processor running 8 bit instructions.
    To keep the price down, they cut the external
    data buss down to 8 bits, and designated the
    CPU as an 8088.
    It the heart of the CPU is still 16 bit, but the
    pipe coming into the CPU is 8 bit wide.

    Then they come out with the 80186 which
    shifted back to a full 16bit layout.

    Then they made the breakthrough.
    The 80286.
    The first CPU that allowed full 16bit instructions
    The first CPU that allowed protected mode operation.
    The first CPU that allowed pipeline processing.
    The first CPU that allowed true multiple processor systems.
    (A feature that still isn't used much today in CPU's.)

    It will always be my overall favorite CPU.

    My favorite under utilized CPU is the 80186.
    The first CPU that started the MHz race.
    When the 8088s of the world was running 2.5Mhz, it
    ran in with a blistering 7.5MHz!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    The 8088s tried to go to 5MHz and finally 10MHz
    but they never caught back up.

    I wish they would come out with a modern version of a 80286
    that is running at 2GHz.
    If the Celerons of the world have a millions of transistors in them
    and the 80286 has only a million.
    Then I would say that they could put a 100 2GHz 80286s on
    the same chip, and have all of them setup as one big parallel processor.
    Now that would be a good base for artificial neural networks. :)



    › See More: Why Larry gets crap (back)
  2. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    On Sat, 15 Nov 2003 20:22:29 GMT, David S <dwstreeter@att.nut> wrote:

    >Hey, Lar', last time you renewed your ham ticket, did you read and sign the
    >RF safety statement? It's a new (well, several years now) requirement for
    >EVERYBODY, even if they've had their license for a million years like you.
    >

    I might have clicked on it....??? I renewed online with my FIRS or
    was it TIN or was it....aw, nuts, one of them FCC numbers they made me
    apply for.

    I must be RF safe. The old twin 4-1000A linear I built didn't make my
    skin redder, not even a shade. There was an issue about the exploding
    pole transformer burning our power pole to the ground, but don't
    believe any rumors you hear about the ensuing fire.....(c;

    DE W4CSC

    NNNN (They always put that at the end of important looking teletype
    messages.)

    AR


    Larry W4CSC

    "Very funny, Scotty! Now, BEAM ME MY CLOTHES! KIRK OUT!"
  3. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    Any of you boys wanna upgrade your Windoze system? I got a couple of
    CP/M luggables with two floppy drives if you wanna relive the golden
    age of home computing....complete with good Z-80 processors!

    Everybody knows the command to copy floppies begins with PIP right?

    Ah, the sweet feel of a powerful BASIC interpreter.....



    Larry W4CSC

    "Very funny, Scotty! Now, BEAM ME MY CLOTHES! KIRK OUT!"
  4. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    On Sat, 15 Nov 2003 20:54:36 GMT, "N9WOS"
    <n9wos@nobug.worldnet.att.net> wrote:

    >> C:\DOS
    >> C:\DOS\RUN
    >> RUN\DOS\RUN
    >>
    >> Windows 95:
    >> A 32 bit application on top of
    >> A 16 bit operating system running on
    >> An 8 bit computer emulating
    >> A 4 bit architecture written by
    >> A 2 bit company that won't stand
    >> One bit of competition

    >
    >LOL.
    >
    >One think that a lot of people don't know is that
    >there never was really an 8bit PC.
    >

    I beg your pardon!?? My first "PC" ran an 8008. My other PC's ran
    Z-80's, 6502s, 6800's!

    I believe you were referring to your first IBM PC......Damned
    newbies....(c;

    Input was 12 toggle switches and 3 pushbuttons (stepping). Output was
    8 light bulbs, one for each bit, across the front of the
    panel.....well, until some smartass came out with a $249 teletype
    interface kit, complete with loop power supply for the 20ma loop.
    Yeah, I bought it. I think there's still some games on paper tape out
    of the reperf machine on my KSR console around here,
    somewhere.....along with some teletype Vargas Girls that print for
    hours and take even longer to download on a 300 baud acoustic-coupled
    modem, just for fun....(c;

    No 8-bit PC's my ass.....hee hee.

    REAL programmers program in machine language stepping through each
    byte with a pushbutton to enter the next byte, manually!



    Larry W4CSC

    "Very funny, Scotty! Now, BEAM ME MY CLOTHES! KIRK OUT!"
  5. Al Klein

    Al Klein Guest

    On Sat, 15 Nov 2003 23:17:35 GMT, nospam@home.com (Larry W4CSC) posted
    in alt.cellular.verizon:

    >Any of you boys wanna upgrade your Windoze system? I got a couple of
    >CP/M luggables with two floppy drives if you wanna relive the golden
    >age of home computing....complete with good Z-80 processors!


    Kaypros? Nice machines. Or are you talking about Osbornes?

    I prefer my Kim with a Kimsai. Or my Godbout Imsai front panel.
  6. "Al Klein" <rukbat@pern.org> wrote in message =
    news:uqndrvcc0cu4is3cjtppvrohubqtsfm4l9@Pern.rk...
    > On Sat, 15 Nov 2003 23:17:35 GMT, nospam@home.com (Larry W4CSC) posted
    > in alt.cellular.verizon:
    >=20
    > >Any of you boys wanna upgrade your Windoze system? I got a couple of
    > >CP/M luggables with two floppy drives if you wanna relive the golden
    > >age of home computing....complete with good Z-80 processors!

    >=20
    > Kaypros? Nice machines. Or are you talking about Osbornes?
    >=20
    > I prefer my Kim with a Kimsai. Or my Godbout Imsai front panel.


    Geez. I still have my old DEC PDP-11/05,
    with cassette tape and 8-inch floppy drives!
    My kids were the first ones in their schools to use the excuse
    that the computer ate their homework.

    My MicroVAX 2 with VMS version 7 is still here, too.
    Now there was a REAL personal computer,
    especially with its 21-inch color monitor.
    VMS can boot from the mag tape drive, if you wish.
    That made restoring a hard-drive image very simple.
    ---JRC---
  7. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    On Sun, 16 Nov 2003 02:24:16 GMT, Al Klein <rukbat@pern.org> wrote:

    >On Sat, 15 Nov 2003 23:17:35 GMT, nospam@home.com (Larry W4CSC) posted
    >in alt.cellular.verizon:
    >
    >>Any of you boys wanna upgrade your Windoze system? I got a couple of
    >>CP/M luggables with two floppy drives if you wanna relive the golden
    >>age of home computing....complete with good Z-80 processors!

    >
    >Kaypros? Nice machines. Or are you talking about Osbornes?


    Kaypros. Has color screen.....green.
    >
    >I prefer my Kim with a Kimsai. Or my Godbout Imsai front panel.


    S-100 bus man, myself. Remember those big 16K memory expansion
    boards?!



    Larry W4CSC

    "Very funny, Scotty! Now, BEAM ME MY CLOTHES! KIRK OUT!"
  8. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    On Sun, 16 Nov 2003 20:16:53 GMT, "John R. Copeland"
    <jcopelan@columbus.rr.com> wrote:


    >Geez. I still have my old DEC PDP-11/05,
    >with cassette tape and 8-inch floppy drives!
    >My kids were the first ones in their schools to use the excuse
    >that the computer ate their homework.
    >
    >My MicroVAX 2 with VMS version 7 is still here, too.
    >Now there was a REAL personal computer,
    >especially with its 21-inch color monitor.
    >VMS can boot from the mag tape drive, if you wish.
    >That made restoring a hard-drive image very simple.
    >---JRC---
    >

    Man, those with MONEY just gotta flaunt it, don't they?...(c;

    Someone gave me a Systems 34, complete small manufacturing system with
    4 terminals, a chain printer, twin hard drives and all the
    manufacturing software, just to get rid of it. I never had the
    3-phase 440VAC power to run it and ended up pushing it up a ramp into
    a dumpster for them to haul off. I saved a few nice fans and some
    really HUGE capacitors from the power supply in the console. I
    couldn't give it away.....(snif).

    Not everybody can go around their computer club braggin' they once
    owned a Systems 34 by Big Blue.....(c;



    Larry W4CSC

    "Very funny, Scotty! Now, BEAM ME MY CLOTHES! KIRK OUT!"
  9. "Larry W4CSC" <nospam@home.com> wrote in message =
    news:3fb7fb5f.85225363@news.knology.net...
    >=20
    >=20
    > Not everybody can go around their computer club braggin' they once
    > owned a Systems 34 by Big Blue.....(c;
    >=20
    > Larry W4CSC
    >=20


    That gets MY attention!
    ---JRC---
  10. David S

    David S Guest

    On Sun, 16 Nov 2003 22:33:22 GMT, nospam@home.com (Larry W4CSC) chose to
    add this to the great equation of life, the universe, and everything:

    > Remember those big 16K memory expansion
    >boards?!


    My father was just telling me about when his employer (Kroehler Furniture)
    got a new piece of software that needed 32K of RAM, so they had to buy 16K.
    It was in a standard 19" rack mount, filling about half of the cabinet's
    6-8' height. It was trucked, by itself, from Massachusetts. The boss had a
    fit when the driver and his helper started to unload it themselves; he
    called the factory foreman, who sent over a forklift. This was in the late
    '60s.

    Remember the Y2K problem? Some of his coworkers then were using ONE digit
    for the year, driving themselves directly toward a Y70 problem.

    --
    NOTE: the virus mails are starting again, so change nut to net to reply.
    David Streeter, "an internet god" -- Dave Barry
    http://home.att.net/~dwstreeter
    Expect a train on ANY track at ANY time.
    "Imagine how you would feel if you tuned in to the evening news and learned
    that, for example, Fran Dresher had been sucked dry by a gnat the size of a
    water buffalo. You'd feel pretty excited. You'd hope there was video."
    - Dave Barry
  11. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    The first storage I remember was a drum memory I saw on a tour of
    Cornell University. I forget the date. We were asked to tip-toe
    around the floor and not to touch the unit at all because there were
    serious head crash problems, even from passing vehicles on a road 1/2
    mile away!

    Now I carry my 60GB hard drive, thousands of times more storage,
    around inside my Archos Studio 20 (modified to 60Ghz) in my pocket
    playing my fav tunes....

    Come a long way, haven't we?

    On Mon, 17 Nov 2003 05:08:32 GMT, David S <dwstreeter@att.nut> wrote:

    >On Sun, 16 Nov 2003 22:33:22 GMT, nospam@home.com (Larry W4CSC) chose to
    >add this to the great equation of life, the universe, and everything:
    >
    >> Remember those big 16K memory expansion
    >>boards?!

    >
    >My father was just telling me about when his employer (Kroehler Furniture)
    >got a new piece of software that needed 32K of RAM, so they had to buy 16K.
    >It was in a standard 19" rack mount, filling about half of the cabinet's
    >6-8' height. It was trucked, by itself, from Massachusetts. The boss had a
    >fit when the driver and his helper started to unload it themselves; he
    >called the factory foreman, who sent over a forklift. This was in the late
    >'60s.
    >
    >Remember the Y2K problem? Some of his coworkers then were using ONE digit
    >for the year, driving themselves directly toward a Y70 problem.
    >
    >--
    >NOTE: the virus mails are starting again, so change nut to net to reply.
    >David Streeter, "an internet god" -- Dave Barry
    >http://home.att.net/~dwstreeter
    >Expect a train on ANY track at ANY time.
    >"Imagine how you would feel if you tuned in to the evening news and learned
    >that, for example, Fran Dresher had been sucked dry by a gnat the size of a
    >water buffalo. You'd feel pretty excited. You'd hope there was video."
    >- Dave Barry
    >



    Larry W4CSC

    "Very funny, Scotty! Now, BEAM ME MY CLOTHES! KIRK OUT!"
  12. Larry W4CSC <nospam@home.com> wrote:

    > Now I carry my 60GB hard drive, thousands of times more storage,
    > around inside my Archos Studio 20 (modified to 60Ghz) in my pocket
    > playing my fav tunes....


    > Come a long way, haven't we?


    Indeed. Seen those 20-30GB hard drives that are no bigger than your thumb?

    I remember the 10 *MB* disk packs my dad's Univac BC7 minicomputer used to use.
    They were about 12-15 inches in diameter and weight several pounds.

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services
    22674 Motnocab Road * Apple Valley, CA 92307-1950
    Steve Sobol, Proprietor
    888.480.4NET (4638) * 248.724.4NET * sjsobol@JustThe.net
  13. Al Klein

    Al Klein Guest

    On Sun, 16 Nov 2003 22:33:22 GMT, nospam@home.com (Larry W4CSC) posted
    in alt.cellular.verizon:

    >On Sun, 16 Nov 2003 02:24:16 GMT, Al Klein <rukbat@pern.org> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sat, 15 Nov 2003 23:17:35 GMT, nospam@home.com (Larry W4CSC) posted
    >>in alt.cellular.verizon:
    >>
    >>>Any of you boys wanna upgrade your Windoze system? I got a couple of
    >>>CP/M luggables with two floppy drives if you wanna relive the golden
    >>>age of home computing....complete with good Z-80 processors!

    >>
    >>Kaypros? Nice machines. Or are you talking about Osbornes?

    >
    >Kaypros. Has color screen.....green.
    >>
    >>I prefer my Kim with a Kimsai. Or my Godbout Imsai front panel.

    >
    >S-100 bus man, myself. Remember those big 16K memory expansion
    >boards?!


    Remember them? I wire-wrapped many of them.
  14. Al Klein

    Al Klein Guest

    On Sun, 16 Nov 2003 19:58:48 GMT, "John R. Copeland"
    <jcopelan@columbus.rr.com> posted in alt.cellular.verizon:

    >"Al Klein" <rukbat@pern.org> wrote in message news:addbrv0iin9too0e4rm8ihj2361sdgrnhc@Pern.rk...


    >> Not true at all. I run Q-Edit and Cardfile on XP every day. (Now if
    >> only I could get Diskedit to run on XP.)


    >Did the old Diskedit do anything that Dskprobe does not do in XP now?
    >They are pretty similar, insofar as I remember DE.


    Hex and ASCII display, allows you to read/write to any sector,
    including the partition block and boot sector, displays the sector in
    its native mode - IOW a FAT sector is displayed as a FAT - but you can
    switch the display to whatever you like (like marking a partition type
    as something not real).

    I just downloaded a copy of Dskprobe, so I'll see how useful it is.
    Thanks.
  15. Larry W4CSC

    Larry W4CSC Guest

    On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 07:09:01 GMT, Al Klein <rukbat@pern.org> wrote:

    >
    >Remember them? I wire-wrapped many of them.


    Ah, the simple pleasure of finding that ONE corroded wirewrap terminal
    that was making intermittent connection on the most significant
    bit.....usually during the most important moment in the program.



    Larry W4CSC

    "Very funny, Scotty! Now, BEAM ME MY CLOTHES! KIRK OUT!"
  16. Al Klein

    Al Klein Guest

    On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 12:56:01 GMT, nospam@home.com (Larry W4CSC) posted
    in alt.cellular.verizon:

    >On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 07:09:01 GMT, Al Klein <rukbat@pern.org> wrote:


    >>Remember them? I wire-wrapped many of them.


    >Ah, the simple pleasure of finding that ONE corroded wirewrap terminal
    >that was making intermittent connection on the most significant
    >bit.....usually during the most important moment in the program.


    Nah. It was always an address decoder.
  17. Al Klein

    Al Klein Guest

    On Mon, 17 Nov 2003 05:08:32 GMT, David S <dwstreeter@att.nut> posted
    in alt.cellular.verizon:

    >Remember the Y2K problem? Some of his coworkers then were using ONE digit
    >for the year, driving themselves directly toward a Y70 problem.


    Storage - both RAM and off-line - was expensive in those days. You
    saved every byte (literally) that you could. But you could pack "70"
    into a single byte - one digit in each nibble. It only takes 4 bits
    to represent 10 (or 16) digits.
  18. Al Klein

    Al Klein Guest

    On Mon, 17 Nov 2003 23:11:09 GMT, nospam@home.com (Larry W4CSC) posted
    in alt.cellular.verizon:

    >The first storage I remember was a drum memory I saw on a tour of
    >Cornell University. I forget the date. We were asked to tip-toe
    >around the floor and not to touch the unit at all because there were
    >serious head crash problems, even from passing vehicles on a road 1/2
    >mile away!


    The original AT with the 10 meg drive had the same problem. :)

    >Now I carry my 60GB hard drive, thousands of times more storage,
    >around inside my Archos Studio 20 (modified to 60Ghz) in my pocket
    >playing my fav tunes....


    >Come a long way, haven't we?


    I was just thinking that today when I backed up today's work to my 20
    gig Pockey. Which just reminded me to take the thing out of my
    pocket.

    We sure have, Larry.
  19. Al Klein

    Al Klein Guest

    On Mon, 17 Nov 2003 20:06:00 -0600, Steven J Sobol
    <sjsobol@JustThe.net> posted in alt.cellular.verizon:

    >Indeed. Seen those 20-30GB hard drives that are no bigger than your thumb?


    A few years and that'll be 20-30 TB.
  20. David S

    David S Guest

    On Wed, 19 Nov 2003 04:39:07 GMT, Al Klein <rukbat@pern.org> chose to add
    this to the great equation of life, the universe, and everything:

    >On Mon, 17 Nov 2003 05:08:32 GMT, David S <dwstreeter@att.nut> posted
    >in alt.cellular.verizon:
    >
    >>Remember the Y2K problem? Some of his coworkers then were using ONE digit
    >>for the year, driving themselves directly toward a Y70 problem.

    >
    >Storage - both RAM and off-line - was expensive in those days. You
    >saved every byte (literally) that you could. But you could pack "70"
    >into a single byte - one digit in each nibble. It only takes 4 bits
    >to represent 10 (or 16) digits.


    Well, maybe they weren't that smart, or maybe they were just being lazy.

    --
    David Streeter, "an internet god" -- Dave Barry
    http://home.att.net/~dwstreeter
    Expect a train on ANY track at ANY time.
    "Diplomats and bureaucrats may function differently, but they achieve
    exactly the same results." - Spock

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